Your Next Strategic Move, with Brian Walker

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode Benji talks to Brian Walker, Chief Strategy Officer (CSO) at Bloomreach and host of the "Commerce Experience" Podcast.

Conversations from the front lines and marketing. This is be tob growth. This is B tob growth. Coming to you from just outside Austin, Texas. I'm your host, Benjie Block, and joining us from Nashville, Tennessee our director of audience growth here at sweet fish, Dan Sanchez, and from Louisville, Kentucky, our creative content lead, Emily Brady. Now here. In just a few minutes we're going to jump to a recent conversation that I had with Brian Walker. He's the chief strategy officer over at Bloom reach and we talked a lot about his go to market strategy and how they're creating this and cultivating a unique ecosystem over there. Before we do that, we're here for some show and tell and we want to talk about some recent things we've seen in and around marketing. Dan, what are you taking to look at today? We did a large survey of informal interviews with a lot of the guests we have on B tob growth. We interviewed over a hundred BEDB marketing leaders. We have some variety of questions, about dozen different questions, but one of the big questions we asked them was what is the major hurdle for your team over the next quarter of the next year? We tried phrasing the question different ways, but generally, what's the biggest problem you have in your marketing team? And over and over and over again I at different responses, but they are all communicating the same thing, and this is the major hurdle facing most marketing teams right now is the lack of focus, and that comes out in different forms. It comes at as we have too many things to do, not enough hands to do them, not enough budget to execute it and just generally lack of prioritization, lack of focus. It is the thing that plagues all marketing teams and I think there's a number of different reasons for this and some possible solutions, but I have to say that I've I've certainly experienced that. I Know Benjie and emily were nodding their head like yes, this is a thing and even runs a little bit counter to the conversation we had in the last conversation at last previous episode, what a week ago, Benjie, about the good, the good it is to experiment. So it opens up a can of worms, like we need to focus, yet we need to experiment and try new things, because there's all these different things going on. So what's the right answer and how can we essentially conquer this problem and do it while still experimenting so that we aren't left left behind? I think, man, this is what makes marketing difficult. Is like knowing what to use language we've talked about here before, what waves we actually want to ride and what to sort of sit out. You have to have a system for experimentation so you don't get left behind. But if you experiment so much that you aren't an expert in anything in your marketing, like your strategy is so convoluted, you're just going while, we tried that, and we tried that, and we do the new thing every two weeks and new week, a new thing every month, and you get to this place of like, man, it will bog you down real easily because you know there's a million things you could be doing or even sometimes, and I'm I feel this, there's a million things I should be doing, like that's that lack of focus. The mind game for me is I hear in the back of my head like, Oh, you should be doing fill in the blank, and that kind of motor that's always running, that's aware of all the things that I'm not doing, makes me actually kind of worse at the things I am doing because I'm slowed down by the lack of focus. I don't have like this great answer for it. I we talked about it previously that we have to experiment, and one of the ways we experiment is by having it baked into our team or like time in our schedule where we're doing that. Maybe by only...

...having a certain time for experimentation, it frees us up to truly focus on what we should be focused on the rest of the time. I don't know, Emily, what are you what do you think? Like? I mean, we all experience this. We've all been nodding our heads. Yeah, I don't think it has to be. It doesn't always have to be an either or scenario. Like you can experiment with focus, which is really difficult to do and easy to say, but because I've definitely experience this where there are so many ideas and so many things that I want to test and I need someone to come in and say, let's just do a couple of these things. or it even comes from top down sometimes, where you know your manager, whoever is like, okay, there's all these things we should be trying out. I think these would be really good and I think that being an efficient, productive team requires some pushback from all sides to like yeah, these are really great ten ideas, but what if we focused on these two? And so it comes from. We do need focus, obviously, and we do need experimentation, and I think it's just deciding what are the right things to focus on, because clearly you can't spread yourself that thin and nor should you. Nor should you be having your resources and several different buckets. It's just not as productive as focusing on a few. So I don't have an easy answer for it, because I'm not. I haven't mastered focus, but I know that it's it can be done alongside experimentation. Okay, quick run through of each of us. What's our natural wiring or bent? Do you naturally lean more towards being obsessed with the new experimentation side of things, like Oh, let's go try this, let's try this, or do you lean more towards focus? You Find Your Lane and you kind of stick in it and maybe you're more of like a late adopter. Emily, you go first. Yeah, I'm definitely more of the first one. Yeah, there are so many. I will find something and I'll start working on it and then it's that shining odd Jack Syndrome. Right, something else comes along I'm like, Oh, I should be looking at this, I should be working on this, and I need to just put myself in this, in this zone of just this is the one thing you're doing, do it really, really well, instead of trying to do twenty different things. It depends on what group you put me in. You put me with the bunch of entrepreneurs and I look like the steady, focused one, because entrepreneurs are on the extreme side of always chasing the new thing. But if you put me in a group of, let's say, I mean, of course, like accountants, right, they're going to be on the other side of like stay, stay with it, like financial people or project managers, then I look like the crazy one coming up with ideas. In amongst marketers, I find them a little bit more focused and steady. Amongst marketers I will usually pick a few channels and then trying to hammer those channels before and do well with those channels before branching out. I'm usually the one like which is interesting in this last conversation about experimentation. I'm usually killing more ideas that I'm starting them, and those are ideas from below and from above, mainly because, and I used to tell this to James R CEO all the time, it's like, James, it's not that I don't like your idea. I think it's a great idea, I just think your idea from two weeks ago is even better. Trying to protect it, trying to protect your last great idea from your current great idea. Okay, yeah, otherwise we're not going to get either of them done. So which would you rather have? All of it? Well, no, we can't do all of it. We can't accomplish everything. We have to pick which was going to do and marketing. We all know good. All marketers know good marketing. Just takes time. Unfortunately, we have things we have to accomplish and benchmarks and leads. We need to generate demand that needs to come through so we have more higher, larger sales pipeline before the end of the quarter and all this kind of stuff. So not always easy to balance, but it is. There is a balance there. Yeah, I think for me I resonate was what you just said. Dan. That depends on the room you put me in. I love thinking and like processing ideas with people and like making them as good as they can...

...be. So I'm never I don't like being the person in the room that's like necessarily killing the idea. I would rather like see how good we could make it. But then, in my mind, because I can play devil with the advocate, I can also just shoot holes and ideas all day long and it's so it's really frustrating. I feel like I tend to be a why guy in like why are we actually doing this? And that can be helpful in marketing, but also can cause you to not go past the start line because you're like constantly questioning why? Why is this important? Why is this important? You know there's another way of coming. You know there's so like a long for enough focus to like really just be locked in and okay, this is what we're doing for this amount of time and then we'll come up and we'll reevaluate. That's it goes back to what I was advocating for in the last episode, honestly, is if we could just get some time in our schedule for experimentation to where, you know it's state exists somewhere in your life and it in your marketing team, but it doesn't have it the ability to grow like weeds everywhere else in your schedule and in your marketing. That, I think, is that balance that I desire at least, to just go let's have both, but less experimentation. Then focus, way, in my opinion, way more focus. These are the things were committing to for the cord or these are the big things that we care about this. We know those things. And then we have this ability somewhere in our lives to go okay, and we have this green space, this white space, do something totally different, try throw things at the wall over here. I almost wonder if it's better to to limit the experimentation to micro experiments rather than macro experiments. Like we don't have to experiment with the whole freaking new channel. How about we just continue doing great experiments in the channels were already end in order to like, be mad, be masters of those channels? Like emily, you're frecking fantastic at your experiments with like den and Tick Tock, like. I've seen you post some things over last couple of months, like what the heck like whole new content formats. Yet it's still in the same channel, but it's really good and it really drives it forward, which is why you're getting a lot of attention. People want to talk to you because you're you're having some breakthroughs with their experiments, and not all of them break through right. Some of them probably don't get as much as tension as you thought it might have or was worth, but some of them certainly are, and I think that's where a lot of the energy can go as into the micro experiments and then probably slowing down or being slow to move on the big experiments, which is opening up a new channel. That's one thing I really disagree with Gary Beyond is being everywhere. I'm like NA being a few places really well as what I found I can realistically handle, and when you scaled and you add more, but that's kind of been my my Princi Bal that I stick to. Yeah, it would be awesome if we could be everywhere and we had all the machines running to the point where you could be, but you don't see, you can't. There's no way you start with everywhere. There's no way. Like I think I look at the last few years of the reason people are on different platforms just because they were told they should be, and then you see this trail of dead twitter accounts and dead instagram accounts and like all these things you should do and should becomes this word. That's just man. You can't base your marketing off of what you should be doing. Like got to kind of at some point, block out some voices and get some focus. Final thoughts, emily. Yeah, here you guys talk about how you're wired. It makes me really thankful to be on a on a diverse team, like as someone who is so distracted all the time and and has so many ideas, like and I've experiences working with each of you, to like Dan always makes me feel more focused and like he helps me put my ideas more are on a streamline instead of going crazy. And...

...then I appreciate also how been do. You always are asking why are like, if that's a good idea of and challenging those a little bit. So I think that's really valuable and not having a team that all looks like you, and especially like in staying focused. So I think I'm really grateful for that and I think that's really awesome and a big part of it. Yeah, Damn, final thoughts. I had a really good final thought and it's now gone well. We would love to hear you guys thoughts on this topic, especially because these last two round tables we've done are sort of on those opposite ends of the spectrum experimentation and focus. How are you balancing them? Can reach out to us on Linkedin and find the show as well. Search be to be growth over there. All right, it's time for today's featured conversation. Enjoy my interview with Brian Walker, chief strategy officer that bloom reach. Welcome in to be to be growth. I'm your host, Benjie Block, and today I am joined by Brian Walker, who is the chief strategy officer at Bloom reach. Brian, we're thrilled to have you here with us today on BB growth. Thanks for having me, Ben Jie. It's my pleasure. So people are going to hear chief strategy officer is my first question needs to be around your title. Tell me a little bit about what that position means, Brian, and what your day today looks like. Yeah, I've been asked that question before. You know, I think that lots of organizations out there do have you know, heads of strategy or a chief strategy officer. I think inside each organization it means a little something different. Here at h bloom reach I'm focused on both go to market and product strategy and very involved in the ecosystem. But I started using the title a number of years ago actually, when I joined a commerce platform many may know, called hybrists, which is now part of SAP, and I use the title when I joined the company, even though I took on the role of leading marketing, really as a way to stay very active and involved outside the company. To be frank, not all customers or partners are going to be necessarily interested in engaging a CMO. Yeah, because they're going to interpret what you're saying is marketing. Of course, chief strategy officer enabled me to continue to engage with customers and partners and kind of a meaningful way and to be more active, I think, from a thought leadership perspective or, you know, when comes to public speaking and things of that nature. And and really, while what I do here a bloom reach is very much focused on strategy a number different dimensions, the role and the title do enable me to kind of be more active outside the company in a meaningful way. Yeah, talk a little bit about how maybe your previous experience in marketing has helped you in your current role in some of the the synergy that's that's happened there. Well, you know, my approach to marketing, you know, like many out there, is to want to engage with prospective customers or partners in a authentic way. Yeah, so what's important to them, what's meaningful to them, how to respond and react to to various trends in the market and to, you know, lay the foundation for their business in a way that makes sense for them, including the technology solutions that they're working with. And so, you know, in a sense, my approach to marketing and, you know, how I approach my role today are very much in sync. Right. I don't think there's really a difference. So it's understanding the customers pain points, challenges, unique dimensions and aspects of their business and then helping them, you know,...

...again in an authentic way, get to the right, you know, solutions and strategies and tactics, and so there's not really a disconnect between, you know, how I may have approached marketing leadership or how I approach my role today. I think you know, if you're in a market for as long as I've been in ECOMMERCE technology and digital marketing and you continue to engage the market in that way, you know good things come from that. Yep. Well, I got to say I'm a big Fan of the the term change there. I like strategy. I think it has it has a whole different way of what you think about and the way people perceive you. So I just like that language shift and I'm a firm believer in the power of words. And so how we think strategy over maybe just a traditional marketing there's a lot there that is worth talking about. There's also kind of a joke, let's hear it, that sometimes I let's say, which is simply that you know, look, the strategy is never wrong. Yeah, yeah, yeah, yeah, it's good. Yeah, you know, certainly. No, just kidding, of course, but the the reality is that there's a lot of pressure on marketers and and the role of leading marketing and today's technology landscape, or really any industry, has become a lot more complex, and so the joke, of course, is that, you know, it can kind of insulate you from from some of that some of those challenges from a career perspective. HMM HMM. Well, I wanted a chat because one thing that bloom reach has started doing specifically, I believe, kind of when the pandemic hit right was to use this medium of podcasting, which is what we're doing right now, and you actually host a show for bloom reach. Wanted to talk about like what was the genesis of that show and that moved it's that medium for you guys. Brian, it was actually something that I'd wanted to do for some time. But you know, truthfully, when the pandemic hit, of course travel, you know, ground to a halt and I had maybe some some time back that I was spending commuting to California. I live in Seattle, I was community to California. I was also on the road, you know, meeting customers, meeting partners, going to industry events, etc. And you know, I found it difficult to try to fit something like a podcast into my schedule. So, first and foremost, the pandemic enabled me personally to just free up some time to do something that I was interested in doing. But certainly the timing was really meaningful in the sense that there was so much happening right and change occurring and everyone was sort of thinking through how to adapt to, you know, the pandemic closing stores, changing business in a meaningful way and obviously a huge inflection in digital commerce and the role of digital marketing for every organization out there. And so the the podcast, enabled me to really just engage what I have as a large network of people out there, very smart people that I could engage with in meaningful conversations about what was happening out in the market and bring that to an audience and, yes, in a sense, use it as a as a tool to help our customers, partners, prospect x become smarter about what was happening in the marketplace. Yep, the first thing I did was not even really the podcast. I started just recording, you know, like zoom video conversations with with some people that I that I knew in the market. was kind of US personally processing what was happening, but also reflecting on what this may mean for the industry. And then that sort of led into launching the podcast. And, frankly, I just really enjoy the opportunity to have smart conversations...

...with people and in a sense that is very much been my philosophy, going back to my days as an industry analyst. You know, I used to say, well, I'm only as smart as the smart people I get to talk to, you know, about what's happening in the market, and the podcast in a sense as an extension of that. So that's really kind of what led to US starting it and you know, it's been something I've really enjoyed doing personally and, you know, I think is paid some some great benefits for us as a software solution provider, to to convey again, you know, thoughtful a meaningful aspects of our industry in a wide variety of ways, talking to smart people involved in many different roles in the market may be to be growth listeners. We want to hear from you. In fact, we will pay you for it. Just had over to be tob growth podcom and complete a short survey about the show to enter for a chance to win two hundred and fifty dollars. Plus. The first fifty participants will receive twenty five dollars as our way of saying thank you so much one more time. That's Bob, growth podcom. Letter B number two. Letter be growth podcom. One entry per person must be an active listener of the show. To Enter and look forward to hearing from you. So that's really kind of what led to US starting it and you know, it's been something I really enjoyed doing personally and you know, I think is paid some some great benefits for us as a software solution provider to to convey again, you know, thoughtful, a meaningful aspects of our industry in a wide variety of ways, talking to smart people involved in many different roles in the market. Yeah, it gives you this kind of unique platform to give your unique point of view away as well, which I think, as those in marketing listening to this snow, I mean what a great thing to be able to when there's not a ton. Sometimes we're in very crowded markets, right, but personality and being able to talk about our unique point of view in a medium like this is is pretty unique and and I love it. That's why I love doing this. I love getting talk to people like you. So I wonder that beginning of the pandemic right, makes sense. Travel, traveling, last lots Tokay, the world's kind of reopened. How has the show morphed over time and some of maybe even the strategy behind it? Has Your thinking changed at all? There with the the world kind of reopening, or how have your conversations even shifted? I wouldn't necessarily say it's connected to the world reopening per se, but a couple thoughts. One is just the medium. You know, we're also recording video here now. When I first started the PODCAST, I was very committed to like we just need to focus on audio videos, not really a way that are very busy audience would necessarily sit down and watch the conversation, but really just wanting to enable them to time shift and use their time to consume this, whether that's, you know, washing the dishes, which is where I end up listening to a lot of podcasts. It's why I always believe that a podcast should only be as long as it takes to really clean the kitchen well like that, or whether it's gardening or walking the dog or what have you. Right, I really felt that podcasting was a was a great medium to help people gain access to new ideas and thoughts and perspectives. Well, kind of time shifting and using their time that way. But clearly today video has is being used as a tool to to also market these things, whether that's, you know, short snippets on Linkedin Yep or youtube. So obviously that's something that we're are also going to evolve, just...

...in terms of the medium. I think in terms of the content side of it, think a recognition that our format has an opportunity to also evolve. So again, really just when we started the podcast and really for almost every episode, we've just been having conversations, me and the guest, exchanging thoughts, ideas. I pitched them questions and then we met riff from there. But now I think there's an opportunity for us to take what we're calling kind of a more documentary style right when it comes to deeper, more complex topics, may be incorporating multiple voices, but then also kind of a point of view or a narrative, whether that's, you know, a more complex topic or more of a historical view on something. And to be frank, we haven't done much of that yet, but that's something that we're looking to evolve in terms of the content to again make this a meaningful resource, you know, for the for the community, so to speak, and then also, of course, convey our point of view through that to some degree. So I think those are really two things that, in terms of how we're thinking about podcasting and the in the show that were evolving. Got To ask you a selfish podcast host question real quick because obviously I feel like I've learned a lot in whether it's in communication or just in how I connect with people, because of my time hosting podcast and was to be to be growth and I love doing it. What do you feel like is your biggest lesson that you've learned in your time hosting? Well, that's a really good question. I think maybe a couple things to think about. Their one relax, enjoy. Right. This is a in some ways kind of a casual medium. Maybe feel free to incorporate a little bit of humor, but but make it really conversational, and the way to do that, of course, is to relax. That would be one. And then the second it's more of a not necessarily related only to podcasting, but I think when I was an industry analyst I also sort of learned this in some ways, but it's easy to forget, and that is oftentimes the best question is the simplest one and rather than try to kind of pack a question with complexity, back up and ask the more simple and sometimes obvious question, and sometimes that leads to greater insights and opportunity to engage on something. So I'd say those are really the two things that I've learned. One is maybe more of a reminder, but you know, so relax and simple questions are good. Don't feel like you need to show off with a complex question in order to get a meaningful conversation. Yeah, as the host, that can be you can be tempted right in the direction of let me prove that I know what we're talking about, but kind of here to shine a light on the other person. So I'm I love learning things from the guests we have on this show and this some great learnings. there. Last question I'll ask you on this front is just going back to the beginning. We were talking about your role chief strategy officer. anyways that you've found a medium like podcasting informing your role, or even before it was travel, and now you're meeting with people in a podcast setting right, you're recording together shifts there, and how you feel any learnings that have informed being a CSO well, I think it encourages me to first of all, you're often doing a prep call with a guest, and so you might also like, naturally, through that process have a conversation about, you know, whether it's partnering with another Tech Company or agency or consultancy that is in our ecosystem or you're, frankly, you know, gaining some interesting, you know, insights into a niche in the market that maybe haven't focused a lot on...

...or a market like geographical market, that we haven't been particularly focused on as a business. And you know, through interacting and engaging with guests in this kind of way, you know you do end up learning things or or recognizing that maybe you need to double click and even challenge some assumptions along the way. So I'd say, you know, again, if you're talking to smart people, you're going to learn something. And so, both through the the actual conversations that are recording, but also through the prep calls and so forth, there's some interesting things. I'll tell you a little bit of an aside. This is not really related to the our technology work necessarily directly, but you know, bloom reach, like many in the e commerce in digital marketing space, have many partners with a significant presence in Ukraine and Russia M and you know that was not lost on me. I've had an opportunity to travel to that region in the past have met many people who have significant presence in those markets, teams supporting clients in the US or in Europe out of that market and so forth. And so when the crisis occurred, you know I had done my my bit to not only personally donate to humanitarian relief and so on, but it also like shared through linkedin and other things, like just a perspective on the interconnection of our industry, Bloom reaches industry, with what's happening in the market, and that led me to engage with some CEOS and founders of some of these companies and asked if they would be open to joining me on the podcast to share. Yeah, and you know I had a few who are open to doing that, but I ended up speaking with Egregoran, who is founder, one of the founders, of astound commerce, and wow, I thought I was pretty educated on what was happening. You know, it kind of nerded out a little bit on the situation and also, you know, I enjoy learning about history and so forth anyway, so I'd kind of done some some of my own reading and so forth it, but I can just say that, more on a personal level than anything both the prep call and then the podcast itself just really drove it home for me the depth of the the the crisis and the humanitarian impact of what was happening. And so that was like, on a personal level, you know, let alone a business perspective, how the podcast really impacted me and, you know, things that I was able to learn, Yep, by doing this kind of thing that otherwise maybe I wouldn't have done that, you know, maybe I wouldn't have reached out and had these kind of conversations and gain a very personal and almost visceral perspective on what was happening. So it's just kind of an a side story of how something like hosting a podcast can end up having a an impact. We saw it beyond work as well. Yeah, I do think we talked about in business a lot, like, especially in BTB space right, making it more human or this connection, and sometimes that can even on Linkedin. It can just become, oh, I see this all the time. But in a story like that, Brian, I love how you bringing that home because it's like, outside of all the things, the goals, the KPI's, everything that is be tob there is a personal level to a lot of this stuff. That is it's incredible to be a part of, and that what a timely example and something that we're still walking through and and yeah, so I really appreciate that example. I want to talk about and shift into a little bit of a conversation on growth here, because I know your background in marketing and you've had your hands and go to market, which you mentioned, and that strategy for bloom reach. You also mentioned...

...this up front and I waited tell the tale end to bring it up, but you talked about cultivating an ecosystem and it's great language, but also I would love to know what that means for you guys right now. So when you talk about cultivating an ecosystem for bloom reach, what is that exactly entail? Great Question. Where a commerce experience solution, rouette or so? We've got a number of different solutions that our clients are going to use to drive and optimize their digital commerce and digital marketing, and the reality is that bloom reaches solutions, just like many in the market, need to integrate and interact with many other solutions right that a client's going to use, so that there's one dimension, there's many different companies that most of our clients are going to be working with and they need those to kind of work together and to the benefit of of the them right it behooves us to pick smart partners and integrate effectively in a value added way and at the same time, often and agency, a consultancy or a systems integrator will be involved in implementing our solutions or supporting a client in that so they're also a key part of our ecosystem. So when we talk about cultivating one right, it's implementing programs and approaches from a partner marketing standpoint or marketplace type programs, as well as ensuring that the right agencies and consultancies are available to support what our clients are trying to do and that they're well vetted and they're certified and they're experienced and also supported by our organization to make the client successful. So cultivating an ecosystem is really just a way of saying it's making sure that the right solution providers and implementation and consultancy providers are a part of our ecosystem and that we're working in a collaborative way that benefits the customer ultimately and what they're trying to do and it's a it's a pretty large, heterogeneous and very fast evolving, you know, market out there. And so you know, especially as we've kind of adapted some of our capabilities at bloom rage to involve more, you know, a focus on on marketing channels and personalization and the Holy Grail of single view of customer and enabling our clients to interact with their customers in a personalized way, etcetera. It really takes multiple different kinds of solutions coming together, ultimately, yeah, to deliver on the customers vision. So we need to make sure we have a we have the right partners in place to make that happen. If I was taking what we've talked about so far, I'd say we've been advocates for strategy, for podcasting, for the human connection that happens even in these crisis right and then we're talking about ecosystems here, and so here's what I want to do as we wrap up, is I want to just give you an opportunity to say, as you've done the work of trying to cultivate this ecosystem, anything that you find to be unique that maybe you know, though we can't see them. You're talking to a room full of marketers on this show, anything that you are doing right now that you find unique that maybe our audience of marketers could learn from when it comes to your guys as marketing efforts and in the things that you're really focused on right now, well as it relates to ecosystem specifically, I mean I think, you know, often times organizations are tempted to just add partners, at partners, at partners, and certainly on the ISB side or you know other technology solution providers out there, often we kind of skip a step and it is focusing on the use...

...cases in the problem to be solved. Yeah, and how does these multiple solutions, or you know the partner solution plus your own, come together to really solve a distinct problem? And you know testing that, testing that with customers most importantly, versus just the proverbial NASCAR slide of here's all our partners, Yep, and this sort of competition to add partners, which can also lead to the you know, paradox of choice. You're giving your customers too many options and presenting a problem they have to navigate between all of those. So I think first and foremost, you know, focusing on high quality partners with a high quality solution that solve a problem by combining their solution in some way with your own, is something that I think is often missed. And if you're a marketing professional who is like yeah, we need we need partners, we need an ecosystem, etc. Think about it also from kind of a product management perspective, which would be what's the problem? What's the market problem? What are we solving for here? What's the value add of our solution plus the partners? That's perhaps unique as well as it's it's practical and it's tangible and you know the customer is going to benefit and ultimately hopefully make your own solution also more sticky. Yeah, and more of liable. So the customer, because they they're getting even more value out of your solution when you add a partner. So that's maybe something to highlight. The you know, there's a there's a lot to it. We can it's probably a long conversation, but that's just one thing I would I would highlight. I think of Shiny Object Syndrome and in this case I think of Shiny Partner Syndrome. Like all the options we could give people. But what is what are we actually trying to achieve here, and I think that is a quality question to be asking in to be wondering, is a fun conversation. I love getting an overview of kind of what you're up to and I think this is a really great place to start to land the plane. Brian. If people want to connect with you, stay connected with what bloom reach is doing, go ahead highlight what the company's up to and then also where we can stay connected to your you and your work. Yeah, I mean where the markets leading commerce experience platform. We're kind of a hidden giant out there. We're already impacting over four hundred billion in annual ECOMMERCE out there in the market, which is a big number. tomazing. We work with, you know, large lots of large retailers, brands, be tob companies who are driving digital commerce, their digital experience and looking to optimize their marketing. So that's kind of what we do. The terms are getting in touch, I think from a professional level, I would say, you know, Linkedin is probably the best of we connect with me right, Yep. On a personal level, yes, I'm on instagram. You're likely to encounter my mixology enthusiasts. Let's go. Yes, I got a new follow I got to find you. Yeah, so I'm fen posting, you know, cocktails that I'm that I'm cooking up and and then I'll so my passions around soccer and fly fishing and things like that. But on a personal level, I would say probably instagram and our professional level, Linkedin, and you have a podcast commerce that's variants, a podcast series with Brian Walker. You can find it, go take a listen. It's been such a pleasure to get to chat with you and thank you for taking time today, Brian, to stop by BB growth. Well, thanks again for having me on Benjie. My pleasure. Well, for all of our listeners, we love these types of conversations. We hope that they help fuel your growth and your innovation. If you have yet to subscribe, if you do that today, you'll never miss a future episode. So go ahead and do that on your favorite podcast platform, and we say thanks in advanced for that. You can connect with me on Linkedin. Just Search...

Benjie Block. I'm talking about marketing, business and life over there and would love to chat with you. Keep doing work that matters. Will be back real soon with another episode. If you enjoyed a day show hit subscribe for more marketing goodness and if you really enjoyed the day show, take a second to rate and review the podcast on the platform you're listening to it on right now. If you really really enjoyed this episode, share the love by texting it to a friend who would find it insightful. Thanks for listening and thanks for sharing.

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