B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2055 · 11 months ago

Your B2B Podcast Questions, Answered

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez takes to C lubhouse to answer your most frequently asked B2B podcasting questions. 

Yeah, All right, welcome back to BB growth. We are doing a B, two B podcasting Q and A today on clubhouse. If you're not already following dan or myself on clubhouse, make sure to do that at dan says, or at James Carberry. You can also follow the GDP growth club on clubhouse. Uh, and so dan, you posted something this morning on linkedin, trying to get some questions for this Q and A. And unfortunately because of the Lincoln algorithm, we didn't get a whole lot of questions in the comments, but we are producing podcasts for 80 different customers. You're on audience growth, consulting calls through every week throughout the week with our customers. And so we get a lot of questions anyway, so let's dive into a couple of those. What would you say is the most common question that we get from customers are from folks looking to start a podcast and we'll kick it off with that one of the most common one that I see out on linkedin. And this is, I never get this from customers because customers have already gotten past this one. But on linked in the most common question is is it too late to start a podcast and my too late to the train. And so I've obviously got a point of view there um, that were biased obviously because we're a podcast agency, but when you look at the number of youtube channels, there are, there are 30 million plus youtube channels. And I don't hear anybody talking about youtube doing anything but going up into the right. And when you look at the number of podcasts, I think there's between 1 to 2 million podcasts. I just see a massive amount of opportunity, particularly for B two B companies. When you think about the fact that there are 1 to 2 million podcasts and the lion's share of those are, I would guess are hobbyists. So folks that are not companies that are not putting resources into the production of the show. And you can tell that because a lot of the podcast that you find having published an episode in over a year. So I think when you're using a podcast...

...from a B2B perspective, there's an enormous amount of opportunity because if any of your competitors have a show, it's likely only one or two of them do. And there are so many opportunities to build a compelling premise with your show, to differentiate your show from, you know, the one or two other competitive shows that would be out there. I don't even like thinking of other shows in our industry as competitive. I like to see them as partners because people listen to more than one podcast Logan on our team just did a poll on linkedin That showed that like I think it was like 60, 60 some odd percent of podcast listeners, I think you had over 1000 people respond to the pole and over 60% of them. So they listen to more than five shows. And so I I don't see other B two B marketing shows in our context as competitive. I see them as other shows that can get people into the podcasting ecosystem so that they can also find our show dan. How do you, how do you typically respond to that when people ask you that question? So many ways to respond? But one that even just came to my mind just a moment ago is that people often compare podcasting to something like a specific social media website like facebook or instagram or Snapchat, which we all know those have lives, those don't live forever. Like Snapchat was here and then it was kind of gone now. It's maybe making a resurgence. Like the life of social media kind of comes and goes like Tiktok was really big and now it's kind of leveled out a little bit like this, the growth on Tiktok is slower and that's okay. Um, so people compare podcasting to trends like that, but podcasting is a bigger trend, much more like online video, much more like blogging right? Which isn't tied to a specific technology, which isn't tied to a specific company. It's bigger than one company, which means it has a longer, it has a slower pickup and a slower gain and a longer if it does fizzle out, it fizzles out much more slowly. And I like to look back at blogging as almost like a marker for where podcasting can go, remember when blogging was all the rage back in the late before, around before and around...

...like 2010, right? And then around 2015 people were just saying it was dead. But if you talk to matt mullen wig, who's the ceo of automatic, the site behind Word press, he's like, we actually saw the most gains after all the hype died was the time when most people were signing up for Wordpress to start a blog and I'm like, we're in the high p stage of podcast right now right now is actually the best time to start a podcast and all the same. Like actually think blogging it's a fantastic time to get heavy into blogging and s video. I'm seeing green fields everywhere, but I'm also seeing green fields and podcasting. Like if it's still young and right for blogging then I'm like podcasting infant baby. So much room to grow awesome. I want to, I want to open it up for questions. So Sean Jackie Devin, Tristen, gina Boris Nicole. If anybody has any questions related to be to be podcasting, just feel free to raise your hand at the bottom of the app will bring up on stage. All right, so Devin is the head of marketing at OMG and uh, and Devin, do we have your permission to record your voice for the podcast? Yeah, that's awesome. Devin fire away with your question or comment. Yeah. So we recently started a video interview style podcast. Um, and so we've been posting things to Youtube and kind of getting into it more, seeing some value in it, really trying to show the value to practice managers in health care for patient communication. And I'm wondering if you have any tips on how, once you created the content, how do you get it out there in front of the right people? What kind of channels are you using to get the most exposure? So when it comes to content marketing, I always think that you need to channels that you're primarily going to hit him like really hard. Um you need a long form content channel and a short form content channel. Generally your short...

...form content channel is going to be where a lot of your discovery happens for me to be. It's hard to be podcasting and linkedin as your podcasting as your long form in Lincoln as your short form content channel. And I like it because there's just so many ways to win on linked in so many ways to get in front of the right people. You can literally do great account based marketing by getting in front of the exact buyers that you want to be talking to, engaging with other people's stuff in order to even drive up engagement on your own stuff for your buyers on linkedin devon Yes, they are. I just wanted to make sure we work because we can go deep on that, but I wanted to make sure that that was, that was where your buyers even live And if Lincoln, so Lincoln's my favorite recommendation for B2B companies, but I've also taking time to go deep into like how searching and optimization can become a secondary channel for the podcast and then of course, I think twitter would be a good route as well. Some channels that I found don't work as well as instagram. I just think it's hard, instagram is hard for discovery in general, like I can drive traffic to instagram, but finding new traffic on instagram is actually pretty difficult. Now. I've seen good cases with facebook groups and I've seen some podcasters do have a lot of success there as well. And then of course youtube for some people who know how to do youtube, but it's youtube kind of its own specialty and you just can't, most people, I find that repost directly from podcasting to youtube don't do well. There's of course major exceptions like joe Rogan and stuff, but for the most part you have to edit it in such a way that works for Youtube. The thing I found Evan with Youtube is the channels that have a specific premise going into Youtube, they almost like create their content for the purpose of using it on youtube. So when I think of channels like charisma and command a lot of other channels like that, where it's, there's cuts every three seconds, uh, they're very much trying to engage the Youtube consumer. I know timmy on, our...

...team has done has a big youtube consumer timmy. What are your thoughts on video podcasting and how to leverage it on, on youtube specifically? Just going based off of what I consume? It seems like a lot of what what video podcasts are doing is they'll have a channel for the podcast, like a Youtube channel for the podcast and every, let's say it's a weekly show on their, their episode, drop date, they'll drop the full episode and then every day from then on to the next episode, drop date. They dropped clips of that episode that are around 7 to 11 ish minutes long and they try to make the thumbnails of those clips as Clickbait e as possible and then it's just literally like a clip from that podcast. Yeah, they pay a lot of attention to the thumbnails to devon side. I don't know if that's something you guys have looked at but designing custom thumbnails for Youtube to get people's attention there. Yeah, I've read some of the material that you have on your website about how to go about this and you know what we've done is record our videos through through zoom and then we use descript to pull up the transcript. So I guess a follow up question I had was it a good practice to if you have the video to post it to Youtube but also to take the audio and post it as a podcast I would say. Absolutely. You had mentioned that you're recording on zoom. I would look at riverside, we've gone back and forth on this dan dan might tell you otherwise, but riverside allows you to record higher quality video and I think the way they're able to do it is they're recording locally on both your device, the host device and the guests device. So their laptop or computer or wherever they're recording from and by recording locally they don't have to do the decompression that zoom has to do. So the video quality just, it looks a little CRISPR, but I would absolutely say you should...

...be using it on Youtube and as well as putting it on the podcast channels, I listen to a lot of podcasts that I'm not subscribed to on Youtube and vice versa. So people have have different consumption habits, would you answer that any differently than Now? Video is a big deal to you definitely moved to riverside, but I do think devon that what something that timmy mentioned, the chopping it up. Like if you're doing those interviews on YouTube posts, the long form video on YouTube, but also chop it up into 3-7 minute clips of the good responses from that interview. We're actually building a tool that will do this for you. But because it's it's so important, I I say that not to try to try to pitch that product that's not even built yet, but just to say like it's super important and it can be time consuming. But I I I I think it's I think it's absolutely worth it. Well, I was just going to say, I would imagine it's the clips that are driving the subscriber count up And then it's the people that are already heavily subscribed. Those are the ones that are watching the long form our methods so far as they've been to post the full video, which the first episode was like 40 minutes long. And then we clipped up probably five, the top five takeaways. And we use that as a separate blog post. So we're launching it this week. So I'll let you know how it goes. That's awesome. Thanks for jumping up here and asking a question. Devon All right. Next up, we've got, we've got Tristen. Tristen is the host of the Cliff Notes podcast tristan. Do we have your permission to record your voice for the podcast possible? Wonderful. So what did fire a waitress in with your questions, Your comments? Um, so little comment and then I'll ask you a question that's probably got an obvious answer, but I like to hear your take on it. So we're with the, with the video, someone was giving me a tip. I can't whether it was a podcast or in another clubhouse room, It can be seen because google loves youtube because obviously they own them and I did some tests afterwards and I...

...think it proves out. But I've got to test the traffic is whatever you're doing do publish. Even if you're doing something like the lips in or your automated service publishes your full show to Youtube and then put bare naked links in the description to your full episode over to your normal show. Because if you search the full title of your show which obviously most people will not do. But it can be seen that this will be one of the things that comes up clearly and comes up first. So it can be a good driver of of S. C. O. And traffic just by the sake of it being there. So I have a I have a B two B show with manufacturers and sort of uh their journeys and their stories. We get very few listens on the, on the full format on on Youtube but I'm not driving people there. And I think uh take away your comment that you said earlier with you have to choose to use Youtube as a direction. It's not a very good format to just organically get traffic and you do need to chop it up and do things. But I think there is a small amount of S. C. O. Benefit just to keep doing it. And that some people may like that format and if you can keep them happy they're all good because it doesn't cost you any time. But if you want to invest in it then definitely do so. So that would be my feedback. But I'd like your short long format quick answer as well. I was just listening when I was walking back home trying to do that and I found like periscope or something like this or linked in works where you're doing much more live and you're using your current audience to like build some some traction and some momentum that even 5, 10 jumping on that starts to snowball into having more people having conversations and lead into into proper connections, proper relationships. So my question was as much around sort of driving that in and I don't know whether your experience to take this one way or the other uh of either me hosting little shows and trying to work out whether periscope is probably gonna go away and I was getting traction there, whether they're instagram lives or linked in lives or some little video...

...pieces, some little Q and a show or something is between the podcasts or trying to work out what I should do with link with with instagram, but you probably already answered that one because I find that I'm sort of promoting my agency a little bit of my own photos just because that's randomly where they go and they connect to facebook and, and the, and the podcast and I'm not sure whether I should split all that stuff out or how to, it's just trying to get more sort of little steps um, as to broaden attraction of my show. Thank you. Yes, Thanks for the question. So dan, I've heard you talk about this idea of like focusing on a couple channels. I think even you mentioned it a little bit with Devin's question to, do you want to take this one? Sure. I definitely try to ignore other social channels and just go all in on one or two unless you're agencies to the point where it's like past 5, 10 million in revenue. You can get way more attraction too by just going heavy into it. Sounds like podcasting is one I would recommend linkedin being your next one. I love the idea of doing lives and repurposing that into podcasting, linkedin live I think would be fantastic clubhouse. That's kind of what we're doing here with clubhouse. But I think if you can get access to linkedin live because Lincoln lives a little bit, you have to be accepted to it. So if you get permission to do Lincoln lives and that's probably where I would go as a marketer, you're probably brainstorming outside the box ideas to engage your prospects and customers working remotely and you've probably thought about sending them direct mail to break through the zoom fatigue. But how do you ship personalized gifts to remote decision makers when you have no idea where they're sitting at B. B. Growth? We use the craft and platform to send hyper personalized gifts to anyone working from anywhere. Crafting makes it easy for your prospects and customers to pick and personalize their own gift in real time and offers highly secured data capture. So decision makers feel comfortable submitting their home addresses for shipping purposes to get your own personalized craft and gift.

Go to craft um dot Io slash growth to schedule a demo and receive a complimentary personalized gift from craft. Um To claim your personalized gift, go to craft um dot io slash growth. Yeah so tristan just from for what we've done it, sweet fish and with GDP growth, we started by going really really heavy on GDP growth. And so we've you know done over 2000 plus episodes on that show and we're interviewing are ideal buyer and it's and it's going really really well about two or three years into that and really trying to crush that single channel. I started incorporating linkedin, started getting a lot of traction on linkedin Organic. We rode those two for a while. We tried earlier this year, maybe later last year to incorporate a newsletter into that. It ended up being a wee bit off too much trying to do a newsletter and the podcast and linkedin at the scale that we're currently at. We'll probably do about 3.5 million in revenue this year. Just to give you some context about where we're at, in terms of the size of our business and that for us was, was too much the reason we're going all in on clubhouse is because we can repurpose for our podcast. So it's very supportive of it, of our existing like to channel focus. So that's, that's been our experience and that's what we've done. Hopefully that's helpful, I think. I think that's great. I mean, I've seen like your your show was one of the inspirations to get started and when my mentor kicked me that we need to move our agency into a nation and focus and I procrastinated too much on his writing tasks. He said, well, you like talking, just keep talking and do those discovery calls as recordings. And then even if nothing comes of them, you've got content out and you put it out and you've got consistent and we're like four years down the line now with that. So, yeah, thank you for that. I think I've seen some people do this stuff, so that's cool. Thank you. Awesome. Thanks for the question. All right. We brought gin up on stage. I asked her to be a part...

...of this. She has been doing her podcast for right at the year and her, her podcast is focused on restaurant marketers, gin. We did, we actually did a clubhouse session, I think it was last week. And you brought the fire on on that session uh, first before, before I dig into my question for you, do we have your permission to record for our podcast? It's absolutely wonderful, awesome. So jen, you had mentioned in article last week that you have a lot of people asking you about podcasting since you started yours, what's, what's the most common question you get? I think the most common, it's funny because it's kind of all over the board, but the one that I've probably heard the most is how difficult is it to do it and how much time does it take? It's about the resource investment, I think in the time allocation, because a lot of my peers like myself are also, we have another job. I don't wanna say another job because it's part of our job now. But um it's like okay, you know the typical marketing, like oh my God, one more thing we need to do, right. And so I'm always very like you actually don't need to do this and that's what we talked about last week. Unless it's really like a good fit for you and your and the world of podcasting anyway. So how do you how do you answer that in terms of resources? So you're the C. M. O. Of a company, you have lots of other responsibilities, how much time you've got an agency partner that you're working with? How much time do you end up spending between pre interviews and interviews and anything on the back end in terms of promotion? Is it 10 hours a month? Like where you at in terms of how much of your time you're actually estimate? Yeah, that's a great question. Um it fluctuates depending on obviously how many I'm doing per month. So at the height last year when I was clicking on all cylinders I was doing almost one a week. Um so 3-4 months now I've been in a little bit of a hiatus because of my...

...shoulder surgery, as you know, but this year we're actually going to do to a month instead of four months, which is you know what we were doing for the better part of the second half of last year. So and and it's you know, it's it's one of those kind of hard questions to answer to because it depends right? But I think I would say for each specific episode I probably spend five hours but that doesn't include like all the time time that goes, which is a team effort with my sales team. I see someone for my sales team here. Sean shout out to him. I mean I get a lot of involvement from the people in my company saying hey you should reach out to this person, hey what about this person or hey, this is a potential person that I think you'd be great to talk to. And so there's that time that's spent that we all spent that we could never, we can never quantify on linkedin and on the social is right being like, hey, but by the time I have a guest it's not that much but I feel like it's not that much because I do, you know, I do half an hour, an hour, maybe a little bit more research on them to learn everything I need to learn If it's a big brand, like a Dunkin donuts or someone like that, I'll do more and more like two or three hours of research because I want to make sure, you know, for any sort of liability or things they can and can't say that I've really done my homework with them and also help you get help with that research again from folks on your sales teams to say you've got to, you've got enterprise sales rep that's, that is focused on Duncan or Duncan is one of their target accounts. Do you tag team that researchers that do you do you kind of bear the weight of that? Um, we can ask Sean because it's a good thing right now. I do most of it. They will give me the initial like, here's why I think it would be someone that we should talk to and it could be as simple as like it's one of my top prospects. When I started the podcast,...

I was just going after people I thought I could guess, but now we've gotten a lot, I've gotten a bit pickier and I want to do like big name brands, right? So yeah, that's the background process, you know? And then most the time I do do the pre interview call which is just half an hour and I've done my research by them. But I collect more information than if it is one of the big public restaurant brands. A lot of times. I need to send them like an outline for them to get approved by their pr department. So then it's a little bit more, but then it's just the actual podcast which, you know, it's like an hour and then the promotion, which is, I don't know the extent of the strategies you guys have been talking about, but it's the social, it's that time on like Dennis. Well yeah, we had Jackie on stage, she had a question earlier, Jackie, if you've got another, if you still want to ask your questions, just feel free to raise your hand. We've got a few more minutes left here and I know dan you had one question that came in on linkedin that you wanted to, that you wanted to answer. But if anybody else has any other questions before we close it down here, just raise your hand, will bring you up on stage to ask dan, do you want to fire away with that question you got on linkedin? Absolutely, I got one legit question on linkedin and I'm like, I better get it. And it's from Israel Siegel and he asked when you're just getting your podcast started, so you're in your first couple of episodes, like how do you invite people to be on your podcast when you don't have like a large amount of episodes? Yeah. How do you, how do you get people on there? Yeah, so I would say, and timmy, timmy can speak to this really well too, and Leslie might even be able to jump in here too, because she's what, she's one of our producers and is working with a lot of our customers that are, that are brand new and I don't have many episodes yet. But I would say you combat not having a lot of episodes by doing research on the person that you're trying to connect with and get on your show and paint a really compelling reason for why you want them on the show. So, hey, I saw this article that your company posted and I thought it was I thought your point of...

...view on this was really interesting. I'd love to have you share that on our show or I saw you post something on linkedin or I saw you tweet about something so something pressing into something about them or their company. I know that you know say if you're going after I. T. Leaders for example, they are typically not posting a lot of stuff from their personal profile. So that's when you need to look at, okay what is their company doing? But I've found that the more research you do, I'm actually in the process of this right now starting a show called young married christian. It's not a B two B show we're going after like christian influencers and I've been able to get a guy that has hundreds of thousands of followers on Tiktok just by sending him an instagram DM, you know, telling him that I've been following him for years. I spoke to some of the viral videos he's done, I've made it very personal to him and he ended up saying yes. And so we're going to have somebody with a lot of influence on our show. That's not typically you don't need to do that level of research, especially in B2B, you don't need massive influencers, you need decision makers that your target accounts to say yes. But I think the research piece is huge to me. Leslie Gin Dan. What are your thoughts on this question? Yeah, I'll just jump in quick because I think this is a really daunting an important question because when you're starting it's like, oh my gosh, how am I going to get people right? And I think it's really important, like the name of your podcast for example, and to talk about like starting a movement, right? I mean what are you doing? Why are you doing a podcast? This isn't just about like, hey, let me like find out how many kids and dogs you have, right, this is like get your guests really excited and jazz about what, what you want to do with them together to make an impact in your industry. And so when you just mentioned the name of that new one, you're starting James. I mean that's like really emotive, right? Like, oh, that sounds really cool. So I think the name of it has a lot because that helps you tell your story about why. And I think in the early days like having...

...that energy and that why is really important to get those people Yeah, timmy with your show, with entrepreneur, with an entrepreneur, have you found that to be like your show? You know it just now, but in the early days, what were you doing? Oh man, I did so much outreach before the show even existed and for me personally the outreach was very, very easy because I was just identifying shows that had guests on that matched the guest profile that I was looking for, so there are three podcasts that currently exist where all they do is interview guests that match the guest profile that I want and I literally would say, hey so and so I saw you on such and such podcast, thought you'd be an excellent guest for my show, purpose driven entrepreneur and I have gotten so many people that have said yes just from that, so people backing up what you said gen, I think there's two things that you're trying to live, like there's the weight of like you're trying to get them to be willing to say yes to coming on, giving you some of their time. But also if you've branded the show after yourself, that's an additional weight that you've tacked on. So for example, if it was the timmy bowers show, I'm like, simultaneously trying to make them interested in talking to me and then coming on a show that's all about me that's much heavier than hey, I think you're a purpose driven entrepreneur and like they feel complimented that I'm asking them, this is straight out of dan's Playbook. I've named the show the aspirational identity of the people that I want to know. We talk about aspirational identity a lot when it comes to podcast naming and so we've got another customer of ours that name there show the innovative agency, she's an attorney and she wants, she wants agency owners to be a guest on the show. So by naming the show the innovative agency just by asking. But by saying, hey, we want to feature you on the innovative agency. It's a compliment...

...just by asking in the way that they've named the show. I'm really glad you just saying that to me dan or leslie any any thoughts on this one before we shut the room down today. Yeah, yeah. I was just gonna say, I think it's giving, giving guests that opportunity. It's like, this is a very exclusive thing. You know, I have, I have a show that is launching now and it's going to be called innovative legal executives. And I think that making it an exclusive thing for them, it's kind of like, hey, this is a really good opportunity for you to be on here as well and just making them feel really honored and giving them the opportunity to talk about what they want to talk about and making them feel special and important. Kind of goes back to building that relationship as well. So you're making them feel important, not just making it all about you and your show. Yeah. Yeah, dan. Do you have any any closing thoughts on this one? Yeah. I would just say for your first seven episodes, just invite your friends. They can speak on the podcast or people that you already know customers that are already like, like your most loyal customers just especially because if you're new to podcasting and you aren't used to interviewing some kinds, it can be a little intimidating. It's a lot easier when you just start with people that you know like doing a solo episode, interview, a coworker interview. A customer reach out to some vendors, like just make the first seven episodes. Really easy ones so that you kind of start, you have some in the hopper already. People will go back and check out one or two and they don't really know like that's your best friend or whatever, but there's nothing really wrong with that. That's how I started my first podcast. I just interviewed all my friends that goes along with what john was saying to write. She was saying she started by asking folks that she knew that that would be on it because of probably some relational equity. She had already built up with them. I forgot to ask him, Ian Leslie just so we're in line with clubhouses, terms and conditions. Do we have your, do we have both of y'all's permission to, to share your voice on our podcast? Yes. 100% awesome, feels super weird saying that because Leslie is literally the producer of this podcast. But anyway, thank you all so much. Thank...

...you jen for being here. Thank you, timmy Leslie and dan for jumping on here. If those of you that are in the live audience, if you didn't get to catch this entire thing, if you jumped on late, subscribe to be, to be growth and you can go and listen to the entire conversation. Leslie should have this up in the next, I don't know, a week or so I would imagine. And so really grateful for you being here. If you're listening on the podcast and you're not already following us on clubhouse, make sure to do that at dan says, or at James Carberry. You also follow the GDP growth club on clubhouse. Thank you all so much for being here and we will see you tomorrow at noon easter are you on linkedin? That's a stupid question. Of course, you're on linkedin here. Sweet fish. We've gone all in on the platform. Multiple people from our team are creating content there. Sometimes it's a funny gift for many other times. It's a micro video or a slide deck and sometimes it's just a regular old status update that shares their unique point of view on B two B marketing leadership or their job function. We're posting this content through their personal profile, not our company page and it would warm my heart and soul if you connected with each of our evangelists, we'll be adding more down the road. But for now you should connect with Bill Read, our ceo Kelcy Montgomery, our creative director dan Sanchez, our director of audience growth Logan, Lyles, our director of partnerships and me, James Carberry, we're having a whole lot of fun on linkedin pretty much every single day and we'd love for you to be a part of it. Yeah,.

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