B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2114 · 2 months ago

Why & How Thought Leadership Should be a Community Effort

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez talks with Becca Bycott who is the Director of Thought Leadership and Engagement at FiscalNote. They discuss why thought leadership should not be developed in isolation, how to include others in the conversation, and the results they have seen from brining a variety of people together to speak to todays challenges. 

Yeah, welcome back to BBB growth. I'm danSanchez with Sweet fish Media and I'm here with Becca Buycott, who is thedirector of thought Leadership and engagement at fiscal Note. BeccaWelcome to the show. Thanks dan. I really appreciate the opportunity to behere. Absolutely. And I'm excited to have you on the show because todaywe're discussing the why and how thought leadership should be acommunity effort. Remember when we were first talking about this in our preinterview, I was excited because usually thought leadership, it's kindof a solo game most of the time, maybe a few individuals within the company,but the way you guys are approaching it at fiscal note is so much different. So,but first, before we dive into how you're doing it, what are the, some ofthe problems that you're seeing with thought leadership kind of being mostlya solo game? Well, I think it kind of reminds me of something that I thinkyou and I have both seen a lot on social media and that is the overuse ofthe hashtag thought leadership. It can be like I just did 10 sit ups, that'smy morning routine, hashtag thought leadership. And essentially when it'sjust one person sharing an idea over and over again, sometimes it can beincredibly powerful. There are certainly great articles or videos thatwe've all seen that are really resonated with us. But if it's doneover and over again, it can feel disingenuous and even a littleegotistical. But if you put it in the greater context of what thoughtleadership really does is it's tackling complicated issues with a good idea orsome authenticity about how complicated things are or challenging things are.And in that sense, especially if you look at the past 17 months with thepandemic, the companies and organizations that were most resilientand did the most interesting work were those that worked across teams andbrought in a lot of unique perspectives from different experts, whether it wasinside their organization or externally.

Same goes for you know, statistics.When you look at innovation, they've proven again and again that if you havea diverse range of perspectives and voices at the table, You're moreinnovative and more resilient. So I think if you put that in the biggercontext of thought leadership, it's the same thing. Also, if you want to talkabout the pandemic, everybody is really tired and sad and over this idea ofisolated problem solving, we did it like every day during the past 17months so people really want to reconnect and have thoughtful,meaningful discussions about different issues. Makes so much sense. Everybodyis tired of like hashtag thought leadership. Like you said in thebeginning, it's like every time I see hashtag thought leadership, I just wantto put like hashtag I roll because nobody wants to see people declaringthemselves as a thought leader and that's something we've talked about onthis show before. Like never call yourself a thought leader even if youare one, but I like that you're kind of clue ng in on like if it's real thoughtleadership, it's probably not been developed in isolation, it's probablydeveloped by a group if it's truly bringing the best innovation, that'snot going to benefit just the person who came up with the idea, but thegeneral community, right, Which is really starting to lead. So tell usyou've mentioned some of the strengths that come with building thoughtleadership in community. Is there anything else other than just kind ofgetting a diversity of opinions when it comes to doing creating thoughtleadership in community? Well, I think people are looking for visibility butin an authentic connection forming kind of way. So like when you get a group of,say senior executives, the way we do at the fiscal note executive institute allthe time, you're getting a chance to illuminate what your company isaccomplishing, but you're also getting to pressure test it with other people.So you're again not in like an isolation chamber of trying to figureout a complicated challenge your companies dealing with. I also thinkagain, people just like really the...

...spontaneity of conversation. I oftensay that um well I love throwing dinner parties and I like to say that the bestthought leadership should feel like a really good dinner party where you'remeeting new people, you're getting excited about something you've neverheard about before, You may be getting some affirmation and support forsomething you're trying and real thought leadership is the same thing.Um you, you have that connection with people, you get some support forsomething you're developing and it can be really transformative, one advantagethat I've seen and I think I've done this to a small degree, not nearly tothe extent that you guys are doing at fiscal note, but I usually will have anidea to a problem. I'll test it. You're like, oh, that worked for me and thenI'll throw it out on linkedin. Like, hey, like we've all hit this before. Itried this. This was what I experienced. What do you guys think? And generallyby inviting people to come and critique it or add to it or give their personalexperience with an idea, It gets stronger. And one of the advantages ofmaking it a conversation is that more people are going to accept the idea,right? So that's kind of the point is like if you're doing thought leadershipmarketing, but it doesn't actually connect like you said the thing and noone's actually everybody's like okay, that doesn't mean anything to us, thenyou've kind of failed as a marketer. But one of the advantages is likegetting it out there in community probably increases the chances of itactually being accepted by the community used by the community andactually doing the work that it needs it to do. So I'm really curious like,so I've put like ideas out on linkedin and gotten conversations rolling andthat's like a very small way to kind of get community involved. But how are youguys facilitating these community conversations? I know you guys aretaking it much farther than just kicking it off on social. Absolutely.And to be honest, I learned more about building community online than I everthought I would during working remotely and dealing with the isolation of thepandemic. But I'd say one thing that...

...we've really worked on that helps mewith the fiscal note Executive Institute is we think about what dopeople want to know and start growing intellectually curious about beforethey join one of our discussions. So this sounds like a simple householdthing, but we developed a lot of great organizations do this, but we call itpre reads. And it's basically like maybe one or two or three articlessometimes highlighting a speaker at the discussion, sometimes just a reallypivotal report on the issue that the program will cover. And we send thoseahead of time to everybody who's agreed that they want to join us for ourprogram. And I'll even say this is an interactive discussion, please take alook at these and you know, feel free to ask questions. Um This is reallygood intelligence on what we want to talk about today. So they're alreadybeing invited to start thinking about it before it happens. And then duringthe actual program, the gathering of thought leadership. Like a lot ofpeople, we've done things such as casual icebreakers, where you just havethat moment of human connection rather than like robotically launching into avery structured discussion, We want people to feel free to unmutethemselves and speak up, you know, in the in person version of this samething. Like you create time for people to just wander, get coffee, catch up alittle bit. You don't keep things to locked in again. If you put it backinto the metaphor of a dinner party, like no one wants to go to a dinnerparty where it's only one person speaking the whole time. It's like whenyou're with I don't know like your uncle who like over does it at achristmas party and they're just constantly talking and no one else getsa word in and no one else gets to catch up. You want to approach theconversation in the same way. Um The other thing we do is we buildcontinuity around different themes and topics. The Fiscal notes, Executivecommunity. We Fiscal and Executive institute. We focus on a couple coretopics D. I. Global affairs, government affairs E. S. G. Which stands forenvironmental, social governance,...

...sustainability and digitaltransformation. So um the other thing we do is when we build out our programswere like okay we've done a D. I. Discussion, for example, FBI that's theacronym for Institute. We did a really interesting conversation with seniorwomen in leadership positions and what they were going through during thepandemic as working moms, as single women living by themselves and likehaving no work life boundaries and and leading teams. And so after thatconversation, people loved it so much. So we keep building programs aroundsomething that really resonates to people resonates with people. So alsothat idea of continuity, I think is important as you build a communityaround thought leadership. So setting the stage for discussion, reallyencouraging and supporting people to chime in and not have it be like arigid webinar type of experience or, you know, sit at a desk and not talkand then also just inviting people to keep the conversation going throughrelevant follow up programs. So if I'm hearing you curriculum essentially, youcreate a bunch of different categories. You listed about like five or six ofthem. You're coming up with like a pre fodder within those categories. You'retaking things that have been published recently, debates that have beenhappening or just things that conversation starters, the kind ofThreat people for the conversation, you're like, hey this has been a thingwe know because people have been publishing about this and so you'resending it out to the community. I want to know how many people are youinviting into these conversations and how you facilitating? Are you takinglike 10 people into a zoom meeting? And how long did the conversations last? Soour conversations are never more than an hour. We try to keep our group'spretty small because again, if you want people to really talk to one another,if you have like 70 people on a zoom, they're not going to feel uminteractive. So we do actually invite, you know, up to 70 people becausestatistically, you know, you know,...

...about half of those people won't beable to attend for whatever reason. But typically we have, I'd say like 20 to30 people and in our real in real life programmes. Same thing. We have kind oflike a small group. We keep these conversations closed door. That'sanother important thing I want to mention to you. Um if you're a highlevel executive, you're often grappling with huge challenges and you want likea safe space to really talk about what's going on at your company. Um, sothat small number also speaks to the the intimacy of the discussion and justbeing really, really open with people you're talking to. And there are a lotof advanced virtual platforms that people with huge budgets often turn to.And you can actually make zoom somewhat interesting. It can be hard becauseeverybody is burned out, but you can invite people to share their favoriteice cream flavor in the chat. You can ask them what was something theydiscovered about themselves during the pandemic that they now want to keepdoing even after we get out of the pandemic whenever that is. So, havingthat introduction of human connection doesn't have to be related to theprogram or the discussion, it could just be like, hey, I want to get toknow you a little bit better before we get started and those are fun becausethen you want people chime in and say, oh, you know my favorite ice creamflavors, mint chocolate chip to or they'll be like, I also bought a bikeduring the pandemic. Yes, I love riding my bike, I'm never going back to spinclass ever again. And like these seem really silly, but they're humanconnection moments and it's like now more than ever, people really need them.I mean we didn't realize how much they needed them. We needed them until thepandemic kept us from really talking and being in the same room and now justdiscovering little things about people is so, so powerful and so important. Ifind that zoom meetings are often especially facilitating different kindsof conversations. Like I don't know. I I actually think it probably be betterto use a zoom meeting because everybody...

...is familiar with it. Everybody knowswhat they're doing. Nobody has to be thinking about the tech that can stayactually focused on the conversation and the topic at hand. So I'd actuallysay that unless you have to, I'd probably just stick with the zoommeeting. That makes sense. I am interested like how you control for whoto invite to these meetings. I'm sure diversity is probably an importantaspect and it's you're probably just not picking people who are at randomright there. Probably somebody who knows a little bit about specificallythe category. Right? So how do you go about selecting your community for theaudience if they wanted to build communities like this? Like how do yougo find those people? That's a really good question. Well, our communitymembers come from a couple different places. One is um fiscal note, ourcompany. Um we have a lot of great enterprise clients, huge globalcorporations with C suite executives who are looking for some sort ofcommunity. So I will get to know them and personally invite them to ourprograms as part of just a unique value add of what fiscal note offers andcreates for our clients. But that's aside from that. It's, I'll read abunch of interesting articles on say, corporate activism. That was a reallygreat discussion we had earlier this year and I'll see that Patagonia's headof communications was quoted in an amazing article on how Patagonia hastackled corporate activism, been really active in that space. And I'll find outwho was leading those conversations and reach out to them to be honest. Andlike the best place to do this because email is everybody's inboxes insane.These high level executives, they have more email than anybody. And so whatI'll often do is I will just honestly look at their linkedin profile. I'llget a sense of what they care about and then I don't do it and like a cheesysales way, but I'll just reach out to them and say, hey, I noticed yourcompany is interested in this topic. I'm actually trying to organize adiscussion around this with my team and that, that's been a really good way toget people. Um, it's tricky because...

...like I'm sure you get this two day andthere's so many, there are a lot of sales people on linkedin and this iswithout saying, oh you would be an amazing person at this discussion. Youmight, you'll get something out of this discussion. Here's how this discussionaligns with what your company or organization is thinking about. Andthen the other place I get them, I talked about continuity and like havingsubsequent events that relate to each other after someone is attended afiscal Note executive Institute program, I stay in touch with them and I will belike, oh I read this article that made me think of you and then when there'sanother event I'll be like, oh by the way, you came to our discussion withkevin that focused on asian affairs, we're now having an excellent webinaron china. Do you want to come to that? So I just try to keep track of whatthey really care about and be resourceful and invite people who havebeen with us along the way as part of what we're creating. Just got reallyfascinating. Do you in the night, like not like sales pitch, but do you liketry to get them to come into the community groups saying like, hey,contribute to this thought leadership, like your name will be publishedalongside this. This piece is one of the contributing things to this, Thisthought leadership peace. Is that how you position it to them? Or you justsay get involved in the conversation? Like how do you get them to want tocome come to these groups? So there are a couple of different categories. Ifit's just a program, like we're hosting a conversation, that's a simple invite,and I'll just be like, hey, I think you would really enjoy this conversationand be somebody could really contribute to it based on the experiences thatyou're having with X, y and Z. If it's a piece of content that's thoughtleadership, which are institute also produces, I will, you know, say thiswould be a great opportunity to highlight more of what your company hasaccomplished here. Um I think our network of executives could reallylearn from this. Um and truthfully, people like, again, having somevisibility. So when I reach out to them on linkedin, I'll say I'd love tointerview for this blog post for...

...writing on diversity equity inclusionand how to get C suite to actually be accountable for D. I. At theircompanies. But again, everything comes back to an authentic, real personalizedoutreach effort and that's what really works. 80% of what I do honestly isjust nurturing relationships, managing those relationships and being real withpeople. A lot of my friends and co workers, they say I'm a very abusivelike outgoing person. And so that's how I roll with every aspect of my lifeeven professionally. I know fake doesn't work. It doesn't work with me,like if somebody reaches out to me that way and it definitely doesn't work foranyone. I don't want to say post pandemic because we're still in it. Butduring the pandemic taught us that we're really over a lot of um fakeunnecessary noise in our lives. And also we need to have real um substanceto everything we're doing because life is short and uncertain, you know, notto take it to a really crazy place, but that's, that's legit. I mean that hasto do with marketing, that has to do with how businesses are expected to beaccountable and transparent, that just comes into play in so many importantplaces right now and has been important for a long time. Hey, everybody Loganwith sweet fish here. If you've been listening to the show for a while, youknow, we're big proponents of putting out original organic content onlinkedin. But one thing that's always been a struggle for a team like ours isto easily track the reach of that linked in content. That's why I wasreally excited when I heard about Shield the other day from a connectionon, you guessed it linked in since our team started using Shield. I've lovedhow it's led us easily track and analyze the performance of Arlingtoncontent without having to manually log it ourselves. It automatically createsreports and generate some dashboards that are incredibly useful to seethings like what contents been performing the best and what days ofthe week are we getting the most engagement and our average views perpost. I highly suggest you guys check...

...out this tool. If you're putting outcontent on linked in and if you're not, you should be. It's been a game changerfor us. If you go to shield app dot Ai and check out the 10 day free trial,you can even use our promo code B two B growth to get a 25% discount. Again,that's shield app dot Ai. And that promo code is B the number to be growth.All one word. All right, let's get back to the show. So once you're in thesegroups and there's good dialogue happening ideas are flying around, goodquestions are being asked. How do you then collect and organize all of theseinto something that becomes helpful, especially if you're going to publishits content later. That's a great question. So because our discussionsare typically off the record, we don't record anything like in a webinaranything. Um the only time we've done that is when we've known that thediscussion wasn't going to be about. We did that once with this Summer BookClub thing we did called FBI reads with an author talking about a book. Likethat's that's totally recordable and doable. But normally what we do is weknow they're off the record. We don't record them in an on demand video laterbecause that just again kind of distills and dumbs down what we'retrying to create. We have a writer who listens in on these discussions and shewrites up an executive summary, which is the very high level key takeawaypoints. It's not like word by word, play by play, everything ever someonesaid, it's kind of more like a very high level summary so that if Iattended this and I want to revisit what I discovered and learned, I have ago to published piece of content that I can revisit and look at man. That'sreally interesting. So they're probably in the meeting themselves since there'sno recording there taking notes and then the writer produces a summarypiece. Yeah. And actually I think the executive summaries have been goingreally well. Um This was something that was started even before I joined fiscalnote. They've always done like key...

...takeaways. Um and when I started Irenamed it executive summary and we just did a survey with our wholethought leadership community and they said they loved the executive summaries,that was one of our top most interesting pieces of content that'sbuilt into how we create conversation. So we'll keep doing those and see whatother places we want to explore with a re like a summary or recap of what wetalked about, but again not not making it like a a glib drop in the bucketthing, but something really insightful that someone we want to know about. Sodo you distribute and publish these reports? Yes. Um The executivesummaries are hosted on our website and then we share them on our linkedin pageand we will send them to all the speakers who are like a part of ourfeatured guest of um guest speakers. So they all get them as well because it'snice to have something that you've been a part of, that you can share with yourown company or share with your own network. Like I spoke at thisdiscussion, here's what it covered professional achievement that I'mreally interested in. So what do you label these things? Like, is it do youcall them executive summaries on your website? Like how do you position theseessentially downloads? Yes. They are called executive summaries on ourwebsite. Another thing I should mention, we haven't done this all the timebecause sometimes it's just not possible to pull it off, but we've alsolike, I'll listen in and pay attention to who's asking a good question or whosaid something really insightful, not necessarily just the featured guests,but among the audience and participants. And I'll reach out to that personafterward, I'll say I really loved what you said about X, Y and z. Could wemaybe record a short video clip where you're talking about that again? And sothat's why I don't want to say that stage, but it's just like a way to getthem to like continue to reflect on what they said and for us to capturesomething that's in video content which everybody listening to your podcast,I'm sure knows. You really have to take...

...a conversation and think about how toreinvent it and share it widely beyond where it initially lives. Do you knowwhat I mean? Especially from a content strategy perspective, man, so I'mreally starting to like this because you're facilitating these conversations,if you can get them to show up and actually participate in these, likethey're going to be interested in the content that comes out of it. Thelikelihood that they'll want to share it within their own organizations ishigh. So you're probably getting more buy in from the organizations if any ofthem are customers or prospective buyers, there is that play. But it'salso of course you're inviting a diversity opinions. So it's not just,well while you're one of yours, you could have a seat at the table. Soit'll be interesting. But you could be getting lots of ideas and learning alot yourself while also publishing substantial content. It's kind ofinteresting as we do. This would be to be growth, but we're usually doing it 1to 1. We haven't like taken like a lot of panels are invited a lot of likeminded people from diverse backgrounds into to talk about one particularsubject but would be interesting to do something like that off the record. Wewe also have these like we call the marketing squads where a bunch of VPsor directors of marketing will come and just not be recorded and just talkabout different marketing things. But those we don't use that for thoughtleadership at all. Even at sweet fish were doing pieces of this. But tyingall those elements together, it seems like you get a lot out of it. So whathas been the results that you've been seeing from doing this for a little bitnow? Like what what have you seen as a result of it? Like all people who workin communications, I certainly track metrics like digital marketing metrics.So I'll see if we post an executive summary. How how much did it resonatewith our community? Like what was the highest performing linkedin postfeaturing that executive summary Which one was the most successful? I'll alsolook at our website and say oh this executive summary we did on aiartificial intelligence. It's getting a...

...lot of traffic right now. And so I seethat as a success. But more importantly, I love the feedback we get. Like one ofmy favorite things is in the zoom chat. It's so funny. Sometimes I've never metanyone on this, on this discussion in person. I've maybe sent them a personalinvite and they'll reach out to me in like a D. M. On a zoom chat and they'llbe like, I'm so glad I came to this. Thank you so much. So that makes mefeel good. That makes me feel like we've done something, um, that's beenbeneficial to the senior executive community at large. Other things we do,like we we make these executive summaries available to other people inour company and they might use them like, say you're running a company orstart up and you're talking to an investor who's really committed todiversity equity inclusion and wants to have more visibility on that topic. Youcould be like, oh yeah, you know our Thought Leadership Network that we haveat our company, they've done a lot of programs on this. Here's an executivesummary that, you know, covers a interesting recent event that we justdid. So it has a lot of mileage. It has a lot of application. I like to thinkthat even if it's a very topical conversation that it has, um, evergreenstaying power that people can revisit it again and again as they solve newproblems and see if we're even improving and these critical issueareas, do you like break it up and share it across a bunch of differentchannels? Um, so with the executive summaries, there are a couple of placeswhere we share them. I mentioned, linkedin our website. The other thing Iforgot to say is I send a personal email to everybody who registered for aprogram. Like even if they didn't get to sign on to the zoom and I share theexecutive summary with them, I'll share it if you came to the program and youwant to reflect on what we covered or I'll be like, so sorry you missed ourdiscussion. I wanted to make sure you had this executive summaries, You couldrevisit the key takeaways of it. So I think that's another good thing tothink about if um if you're trying to...

...develop thought leadership as acommunity experience, like how do you make something accessible beyond thephysical attendance of the program? How do you make it timeless and interestingand share it beyond even your basic network? I mean we also, this isanother content strategy thing that I'm sure a lot of people have talked abouton this podcast but we'll revisit an executive summary long after theprogram is over. I don't know, Davis is what if there's like a nationalartificial intelligence day? Like we'll be like, oh we did an executive summary.Um that covered a great program. We had regulation, ethics and challenges of aihere's the executive summary and just be topical and tie what we're doing toa bigger conversation. Thanks. Seems like you get a mileage out of their,out of each executive summary. I would think probably the biggest part ifyou're, especially if you're working with enterprise is just getting thebuying with the participants that came to it and getting them to evendistribute it within their own organizations. Right? Usually whenyou're working with the large companies, there's still so many more people you'dlike to lead or even invited to like different parts of the massiveorganization that could be invited to future conversations, right? If youwant to build relationships, there's so many more people that you'll probablybuild a relationship with and intrigue with these leadership report or theseexecutive summary reports based on the referral of somebody who was in thecommunity, right? Somebody whose name is on the report, sharing it with a coworker, sharing it with their leader, their boss, somebody else in adifferent organization has appeared that they talk to frequently. I wasgoing to say the other thing we've created, it's not just executivesummaries all the time. Like we have also done, I don't know why they callit this. It's a weird term white paper. Like we've done, we've done whitepapers, one thing really cool. So I meant we had a discussion with seniorexecutive women about the challenges and the resilience leadership theyshowed during the pandemic. So out of that discussion came the inspiration tocreate a white paper where we...

...interviewed different executives, womenin leadership positions and government affairs in corporate counsel. And itwas called Powering Through the pandemic. And it was just these reallyinteresting stories and takeaways from what people had accomplished during thepandemic while raising their families, leading their teams. So that was greatbecause then there's this bigger, more robust summary of a very importantconversation that's not just limited to an event but it's like an ongoingchallenge, an area of growth for a lot of people and for their companies. Sothat's been great because definitely more than just the people weinterviewed from different companies have checked that out. We've had thathosted on our website as well so that you know you can be searching for thistopic and find it. You could be the head of calms if the company reviewingit to make sure the person that was interviewed did a good job and suddenlyyou're like, oh this is very interesting and you share it morewidely internally with your company. So is there anything I missed that youfeel like the audience should know about doing thought leadership withcommunity? Yes. Um this is something I'm really excited that I'm I'm goingto develop with our team that works on the institute with me but I have anincredible board of advisors. They are part of the fiscal not executiveinstitute. They give me a lot of mentorship and feedback and they guidehow I come up with some great program topics. Long story short, I was tryingto think about what do you get out of a community as a thought leader? Likewhat do you need to experience? We've talked about the connection, thenetworking and the ability to be a part of a timely conversation. What I wantto do with it is have these incredible minds, these wonderful human beings whoare very powerful and important at different companies. I want them totalk amongst themselves and come up with some really interesting, uniquethought leadership discussion that we in turn share more widely, like as partof their being a part of this community,...

...like coming up with some interestingproject that they want to tackle as a group. So that's what I'm working on inthe next couple of months. I think it's gonna be really fun and interesting andlet people know the incredible leadership that informs what FBI isdoing. That's amazing. So even the decisions about what to cover is beinghandled by community essentially. Oh yeah, I didn't even get into this, butI talked to my board of advisors for ideas. I read all the time. I'm alwayslike reading different things and then I do a lot of one on ones. Like ifsomeone has come to one of my programs, I talked about that continuity ofinviting them to other discussions, I also will just set up a time to get toknow them and say what's going on with your company, um what's particularlycompelling to you that you feel like we could build an interesting discussionaround. So it's very much a collective effort, that leadership is a collectiveeffort full stop. I should also say to just really quickly, like internally atmy company, there's an incredible team and we all work on FBI. Um I have acolleague who worked on it sort of similar to my role who now devotes partof her time to it. She's amazing. Uh My boss, our chief Marketing Officer isbrilliant, she's a regular sounding board, she's incredible ideas. There'sa chairman of the institute who actually founded it and then moved onto a different opportunity at a different company, but he's stilldeeply connected to what we're building. He moderates discussions. We have greatadvisers at the company who I meet with occasionally to just say what do youthink about this idea? So I'm giving you a lot of layers, but I think it'sso important because the best community is representative of a lot of differentpeople. It brings in a lot of unique perspectives. That's how yourcomprehensive, that's how you're on topic and timely and that's how yourrelevant honestly makes so much sense. Becca this has been a fantasticconversation, I've learned a lot and it...

...makes so much sense to me. As you findthere's if you're doing it in community, you're not going to have like a glaringmissing piece, you're not going to have something that you forgot to take intoconsideration when putting out good ideas. So this has been insightful onhow fiscal notes doing this. Where can people go to learn more about howfiscal notes doing this and what you're doing? Um where can they find you andwhat's the best place to look at and find some of these executive summaries.So they should definitely go to our website. We actually just updated itand it has some great new content on it. It's Executive Institute dot fiscalnote dot com. Um If people want to learn more about our company in general,which is equally awesome and important and it's actually building communityand a lot of different ways. In addition to the FBI effort, they canjust go to fiscal note dot com, another great place to dive in and find outabout great ways to find solutions to problems and networks and analysis. Sofantastic. Again. Thank you for joining me on the show today. Thank you. It wasfun. I appreciate it. One of the things we've learned aboutpodcast audience growth is that word of mouth works. It works really, reallywell actually. So if you love this show, it would be awesome if you texted afriend to tell them about it. And if you send me a text with a screenshot ofthe text you sent to your friend meta. I know I'll send you a copy of my book,content based networking. How to instantly connect with anyone you wantto know. My cell phone number is 40749033 to eight. Happy texting.

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