B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 1690 · 3 months ago

Where's the Proof? with Cristy Garcia

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Benji talks to Cristy Ebert Garcia, CMO at Impact.com.

It's one thing to say we need to tie revenue to our marketing efforts, it's another to put a plan in place that executes on it consistently. Today Cristy provides her thoughts on attribution and how to discuss marketing with the C-suite.

Conversations from the front lines and marketing. This is be tob growth. This is be tob growth coming to you from just outside Austin, Texas. I'm your host, Benjie Block, and today joining me from Nashville, Tennessee Director of growth here at sweetfish, Dan Sanchez, and from Louisville, Kentucky, our creative content lead, Emily Brady. How's it going, guys? Going great, Benjie, Whoo, Whoo, I like that cheer. They're all right. So we are back. This is week two of us doing something new and bringing topics from around marketing that the three of us are paying attention to. There's always a lot going on. We're on Linkedin, we're reading books and blogs or obviously, having conversations on podcasts, and so there's so much content out there. We want to just have a little round table discussion. Emily, what are you looking at this week? Yeah, I saw a post from Jaakenzo on Linkedin and he said we need to fix how we interview executives on our shows, because a lot of times they've already been interviewed on several shows or they're coached in what to say. So we don't need to be asked the same questions they've been asked before or a question that's easy to come up with a canned answer. So I thought this was interesting and I was curious about both of your takes on it because you both post podcasts. So what is your approach to especially when you're interviewing executives? How do you get different answers? Yep, great question. So I think it's there's always going to be difficulty. Right, you can't all I loved some of what Jay was saying, specifically at the end of like surprise them with a question that it pulls, that something that you know they're passionate about, but it's maybe a little bit out of left field, so you're not going to get the can answer. What's hard about that is, I've found as I've been reaching out to lots of these people and having them on the show, you don't always know a lot about that person. The pre interview helps, but striking a chord, like finding that passionate thing that then also somehow ties into where you want to take it isn't always like obviously takes digging. That's our job as podcast sose but that's my kind of first thought. is like it's when someone isn't posting consistently on Linkedin and you've never met the person in real life. Like that's why we don't always have a unique lane. Sometimes it comes out later and in the show, and that's always awesome because it adds a human touch. But to me this is part of the art of podcasting, is like can we get there and continue to get better, even though I would say this is one of the most difficult things. Like where do we jump in? Like how do we actually begin? Daniette, have you felt that same sort of tension? Now? I actually have a counterpoint to what Jay said, and I think what I said is actually good for...

...some shows not for others. So here's what I'm thinking. Like there's a show called hot ones where the host does a freaking like he's the epitome of asking great questions that keep people that get interviewed a lot, which is a lot of celebrities, right, movie stars, famous cooks like Gordon Ramsey, and like all the most famous people right. He interviews a wide variety of people that are very, I don't know, interesting to listen to. So he has to come up with good questions other than the Gimmick of the hot sauce, of the you know eat taking bites of ten increasingly hot, hotter, hot wings like he asked really good questions and that's what it's like. The the novelty of the hot sauce gets people onto the show, but it's the questions that keep people listening to that show because he's so good at asking questions. Not all shows are like that, though. If you have a show that's focused on a very small niche and a very particular topic, you could also curate it based on what you know has also already been set on the show and think about it more from your audiences perspective less from the audience of that select of the person you're having on, even if someone gets interviewed a lot, because if you're asking them different questions for the sake of that person, you're doing it for them and for their audience, which is good. You want to invite some of that audience onto your show, but at the same time, well, what about your audience? Maybe your audience hasn't heard that person speel yet. If you haven't as a host, then it's it's likely that your audience hasn't either. So you could literally run through the same things and it would be okay, is a great no, but at the same time you have to consider all your other priorities that you have gone on. Can you put in the five to ten hours of research of listening to the last three interviews they were on, going deep to the Google search to find blog posts they've contributed to, articles they've written to find all their different points of views or things you could dive in on? And one last thing that I'd say is that if you're also a subject matter expert in that topic, chances are you're going to be able to dive into the weeds in a way a lot of hosts don't. I've been listening to an expert recently across multiple topics where he is repeating the same stuff and I can tell the host that are talking to him when they are subject matter experts, because they're diving into the weeds and I'm like, Oh, this is getting good at getting nitty gritty because and they didn't do it because of a day amount of research, they just did it because they knew which questions to ask, naturally. So the more you're a subject matter expert, the more you're going to be able to dive into the weeds of what they're saying and I think that will cover a lot of itself. See, that's that's where I feel like it comes out more often, is in the follow up questions. So to me, like knowing exactly where to start, like because you have your consistent audience. They need context for who that person is and sometimes you can have like I just don't think it's a fast, hard and fast rule. I think the way that, at least for me, it when I'm conducting interviews. You can tell where something's going and I feel like great hosts have questions that they want to ask and then also so consense in someone else's emotion when...

...their interest is peak. So even, just an example for a BB growth episode, I had somebody on when I was in my research phase, right Dan, and I'm going back and I'm listening one of their old podcasts and I got to this question that that host asked this person and I was like, that's what they're passionate about. You can tell, you can tell that they want to talk about it. And then there was no follow up question. So I just made a note of that and when I jumped on the pre interview. I said, Hey, I just listened to this conversation you had. Are you passionate about this? Because it felt like we could have gone deeper on this other show that I was listening to, which you are great on, by the way, but do you can we make a whole episode on that one question? And they lit up and they like that lasted twenty thirty minutes of our pre interview just talking about going further down that road. So yeah, I don't know, emily, what are what are your thoughts from outside, because you're you're not hosting a show right now, but this post Pique your interest? Yeah, well, follow up question, because I feel like I'm hearing two different strategies here. Do you guys think it's better to research the guests extensively as much as you can and then come with customized questions, or to just have really unique questions to begin with that you ask every single person? That's kind of why podcasting is great. It's like we all have our own unique flavor. So, like, I love what Jay's saying, but I wouldn't apply it to every episode. I do like sometimes I'll use that strategy because I know this is good. Like they're already a good conversationalist taking more into account, whereas, like, if I asked an off the wall question to somebody that's more buttoned up, that could throw the whole interview like you got to have strong emotional intelligence to do podcasting well, because some people literally send me back when I send them the questions. They send me back like a script of what they want to talk about, and then it's my job to ask good follow up questions that will still make it seem human, but that helps them that they wrote that much. Other conversations it's like the exact opposite. If I send them too many questions, they're like, I thought this was conversational. So it's more about emotional intelligence. To me, that makes you a good host and knowing how that person gets comfortable. Then it is about going hard and fast rule. Every single time I do a podcast I have this wildly unique question I ask my guests that I don't know that the hard and fast rule works right. This maybe is a more of a question for you, Benjie, but when you're researching your guest, if, let's say, you can't find anything on Linkedin, they're not active there, where do you dig? What other platforms do you dig for those passions that they have or topics that they want to talk all aside from actually talking to them? Well, so, because it's like specifically a marketing podcast, and I'm talking like CMOS primarily, or directors of marketing right here on BB Growth Eur. Audience knows that welcome to be to be growth. So I think the way my brain thinks about it is like anything...

...that is on their website is content that they've created has some sort of purview of the person I'm probably talking to. So like I could just bring up recent blog posts, I can just look at recent things that they've been working on. Sometimes I'll look at especially because we're kind of just finishing quarter one or where. I guess we're in quarter to now, but I was looking at like last year's reviews to see highlight moments and things like that, just so there's some sort of level of intelligence on what their world looks like, even if it's not specific to the person the company more broadly, like if they're that high up, they are there thinking about that stuff all the time, like it's their life. So that's a good way. And then also I try to check platforms that aren't linkedin like I look up. I looked them up on instagram or facebook, just things that are more human to see what their passions are outside, because I've had pre interviews that go really long because we end up talking about running because they see that I have like my marathon bib behind me, or I've talked about Africa a lot because I grew up overseas, so that'll come up sometimes and we just get a good back and forth going that way. Dan, do you think there's value in starting the episode by asking their background, or do you just jump right into it? I've done it both ways and sometimes I don't know both both can be really good. Sometimes not knowing what exactly what you're going to be talking about leads to really good content. Those episodes tend to run long, though, like Joe Rogan does it, but he goes for three hours because he has to give it the time to unpack for lack of preparation on the front end. He has to do long interviews, but that's his style and it's worked for him. I honestly feel like there's so many avenues to win and you have to think about it as far as like, okay, if I think what Jay's reacting to is that so many people do it without preparation for executives that it would be a huge differentiating factor if a show did, especially if they were executives that were really popular, like the CMO of gone, who interviews a lot. So if you're interviewing executives like that all the time and that's like the main type of audience you or type of guests you have on your show, then you could be he have a huge differentiating factor by being the kind of show that prepares a lot with good questions. But if the market was the other way then you could just do the Joe Rogan thing and go off the cuff and it would give a whole different angle. There's so many different ways to win and it's nice to know what the options are so you can kind of use them to kind of figure out where the less crowded spaces I got to say, because we have a lot of marketers listening to this show right now. If you are a cmo or you are someone that is on other shows often, just think about the fact that a can response might not be your best thing, even if you get the same questions recurringly, like don't can your answer all the time. You can also like play with the host right by allowing there to be a good back and forth. So I don't want to just talk to like the podcast hosts because we might have a smaller audience. Of that here on be to be growth, but for those that are interacting with the shows or even as you think of your...

...marketing strategy, it's great to know what you do, but there's a human element to like being able to explain it in a way that's not so canned, that you actually can showcase that you're passionate about it and the why behind it. So I think this is a really fun conversation. Emily, anything you want to throw in here at the end before we sort of wrap this up and send it to the interview? I think I'm good. I think I'm ready to start a podcast you guys, after this. Let's go. We need an Emily Brady podcast. Yeah, this has been a great conversation and sexually you made me realize that there's a whole nother factor that you can use a differentiated podcast. Is something that I hadn't considered before, but I'm like, Dang, there are lots of ways that win here. So even just walking away from this conversation, I'm like, all right, another tool in the tool bell in order to recommend a customers or just people out there on Linkedin, or now I'm by GIBI growth. Lots of ways to win. I like that. Well, we would love to hear your thoughts. You can dm all of us over on Linkedin interact with the content we're putting out over there, or you can find me on instagram. I was just advocating for finding people on other platforms, but that's somewhere else that I'm pretty active, and I know emily is over on ticktock all the time. So feel free to reach out any time to any of the three of us. All right, so we are on to today's conversation. It's an interview that I did with Christy Ebert Garcia. She's the chief marketing officer at IMPACTCOM. This conversation is one on the importance of measurement in our marketing efforts. I know you'll enjoy it, so check this out. Welcome back to be to be growth. I'm your host, Benjie Block, and today we are joined by Christy Ebert Garcia. She is the CM at impactcom. Christy, welcome into be to be growth UNJEE. Thank you, it's so great to be here. Thanks for having me on the show. It's great to have you here and a congratulations is in order because just a couple months back you became the CMO at impact. So congratulations there. Thanks. Very exciting for sure, and we would definitely want to tap into the wealth of wisdom that you have. So let's start here, though. You have this career in marketing and I just want to know what's been your baby, your favorite part, something that distinctly sort of stands out from your career so far in marketing. That's hard because there's so many things. I'll say that I've never wanted to be anything else besides a CMO. That's all I've ever wanted, and so I love I love marketing. I'm a lifelong learner. I study it, it's my hobby, it's my passion and I'm really glad too, I've been given the opportunity by impactcom to take this next, next step. But for me, I'd say if I had to nail down to like one particular thing, it would be watching the members of my team become leaders on team. So when we start it. Four years ago at this company we had seven...

...marketers and now we have sixty. So some of the marketers that we've hired have had to take on a lot more responsibility and, you know, take on their own teams and sometimes most of them are first time managers, and I can't tell you how ourwarding it is to see the work that they're doing and just the confidence that they've been able to kind of build and just makes me really proud. So I think that's my yeah, it's always fun to watch that development. Right, for sure, definitely. Okay, so I want to I mean, there's so much in marketing we could talk about right. There's a lot of good but there's also some pretty consistent tensions and I want to talk about that a bit here. One of the tensions we definitely feel as how do we prove the value that we're adding, and this is talked about in the be tob space scroll linkedin. We're talking about it. How have you personally kind of experience that tension throughout your career? It's a good question to have. So proving performance as a marketer is a lot easier than it used to be, and that's largely thanks to the attribution tools that have come out and pretty much everything is trackable, which is which is cool, but it's still a challenge and I think one way to overcome that, and it's also my favorite way of holding myself another's accountable, is really simple. Say what you're going to do, do it and then share the results, even if they aren't what you had hoped for, especially if they aren't what you would hope for, and in that way it's important to set expectations with your leadership team and your manager of what you'll accomplish and you build trust by saying this didn't work the way that we wanted it too, but here's what we learned and and so we're going to try it again right. Only highlighting the good stuff or being defensive about missteps or blaming others is the number one way to fail and I've seen CMOS make it time time and time again. But you really should have goals for all of the campaigns that you're running and then be able to show numbers and looking at things lower funnel like pipeline opportunities, creation, let's say, and revenue. It's not hard to do and it really keeps the team focused on you know the right behaviors in the right results. So that's that's sort of how we take it in here at impactcom. Yeah, I think it's one thing to say we gotta tie revenue to our marketing efforts, but it's sort of another thing to put a plan in place that executes on that. You haven't always maybe been a part of marketing teams that just excel right at measuring Roy. You're right, the tools are coming and they're better than ever, but measuring Roy, having proof of how valuable you are, very important. When did this light bulb sort of go off in your head, and I wonder if there was like a distinct moment or if it's just been over time, or maybe it's the way you've always been wired. I don't know. Now I don't think I'm naturally wired that way, but I'd say from the very beginning I knew it was important. So my first job in marketing and when I first joined, I watched some sales leaders at that company Complain About Marketing, saying that, you know, the team wasn't doing a lot or you know, the were' driving leads...

...or my boss at the time wanted us to list out everything we had done so that he could then, you know, share it with, I guess, his leaders in the sales team. But really what it what it was was it became a laundry list of these tasks, but it didn't answer the so what questions. Like you wrote a piece of content like so what. What did you do with it? What did you see from it? We didn't have those answers and and so it caused frictions. But from then on I realized it's not about the number of items and tasks, it's the impact from those items. In the biggest impact in every organization is incremental revenue. So marketing should be driving it and should be able to report on that outcome. Otherwise it's just, you know, so what. So that's really how I think about it. We're gonna have a lot of people in our audience that are going, I have heard the so what so many times. So you're you're talking to a choir right now in some ways. But okay. So you experience that and now you're you're passionate about making sure that we measure. So I wonder if we're just going, how does Christy measure? What would you say to that, like what are the things that matter to you. So the first thing is the you know, whenever you're measuring anything, you need to benchmark against yourself. Like the the easy thing to do is say what is it? What's an average open rate or what's an average CAC? There's really no such thing in every industry and every company, every audience type, it's different, and so comparing yourself against other companies, I think it's important to know. You know, probably, but it's really important to look at your own history of campaign. So each channel has its own on set of metrics, and so what we do is we benchmark performance against ourselves. We say things like pay search. Okay, let's say we expect a minimum of one dollar and two dollars out and so if that channel isn't producing that, then we know something's wrong. We're looking at email opens and click grades and paid social performance and direct buys, and these are all measured against past campaigns like month over month, quarter, reporter year, every year, and so that way we know how many leads were going to be expecting from those channels and what we need, you know, and then how to get them. But it's important to not be over confident in your media mix or start to get, like, really complacent, because new channels and marketing strategies are created all the time and technology makes that possible, and so you really just need to see on your toes and spend a lot of time researching a new path to conversion, because your mix today is going to look a lot different than your mix six months from today and you need to stay on it if you want to be successful. The other thing that I am lucky, I'm very fortunate at this company to have a dedicated OPS team, marketing ops, and so they keep me updated. There's not a day in the week that I don't know what channels are driving pipeline and what what which ones aren't, and that's really important for all marketing leaders to know. But you know, some of us have dedicated people for that and other others don't. They have to do it themselves. So it's easy for me to say that. Yeah, I think it's so interesting because you were talking about like six months from today, how much things will change. But also, when we look back, before we were really tracking or knew what how, a lot there wasn't as much conversation around attribut you should models, and also there's a lot...

...of research out now that talks about that on average takes bake what eight touch points. So there's a lot right. There's a lot of time and a lot of effort, a lot of different content pieces. How, when you're thinking of these things that you're tracking, how do you how does that maybe factor into your attribution model? Well, there are definitely eight different touch points and that's been fairly consistent when you're looking at our touch points. But I'd say track everything you can. The ultimate measure of performances are pipeline and closed one revenue. So in order to see that, we need to look at things like mql's as leading indicators. It could take a full year before a deal is closed and be to be especially with some complex sales processes. So we need to assume that not everything is going to be visible right away. It's not like you press a button in the next day you see exactly what happens. Some some of these different campaigns, and especially in B to be like, they take they take some time. So whatever you decide to measure, just measure it consistently and use your own performance as benchmark, like I said, but you also need to accept the fact that not everything is measurable. There's some things we want to do because it's is common sense right or based on experience, and we can't prove a direct line to revenue. So dark social will be a good example of this. Public Relations, big speaking opportunities, brand campaigns. You know, people are seeing you on stage, they're seeing your logo and they're going to remember that somehow sometime, but you're never going to be able to tie it back exactly to that particular incident. So you have to be wherever your consumer is right and so you need to be all over those places, given how many touch points. But like, will I know that one of our prospects is searching gt for reviews and that they say they saw the reviews and then they came and converted on the site, like you know? Absolutely not, like you're never going to know that. But do we still invest time and budget on optimizing our GT listing and page? Like? Sure, because we know that consumers are looking at review sites and the same is true for social media and other other media. So it's really just about using common sense, drawing from your experience and looking at past performance. Is there anything that you feel like, when you look at what we measure when you were you mean knowing that you're talking to a room full of marketers right now. Do you think there's something that we need to kind of quit doing in our marketing measurement? I would say the vanity metrics are are sort of you know, I don't see those being really concrete like standards are indicators of performance. So I've never been a big let's look at the impressions and sort of just make assumptions based on the fact that we had a million views on something like it's I like the moving to outcomes type of model where you're looking at like the acquisition, the conversion, and so I try to see on money and channels that can provide that for me versus like maybe display or, you know, even some for targeting, where you just you're never going to get that satisfaction of knowing someone actually clicked. But you know, not to discredit those channels at all, but we you need to partner with your sales team, I think mostly, and yeah, especially for the big targeted like account base marketing campaigns. They may not answer a phone...

...call but they'll open an email or vice versa. So I don't know if that answers the question. But no, I definitely does. It definitely does. So I one thing that I think there's a breakdown in is the way that marketing maybe talks to other departments about what they're doing. That was a problem in your story earlier, right when you started to realize this. Oh we have this list and so what? Let's talk about these two different groups. Right. So there's how we communicate with sales and then there's also how marketing communicates with the C suite when we're thinking about our attribution and all of this. In your current organization you're blessed with a great relationship. I know from previous conversation with you you guys get along really well, but talk me through a little bit of what that relationship like looks like and your guys conversations around attribution. Maybe we can glean some things, learn some things from that. Yeah, so I would say the conversations with the sales team and with my marketing team and with the executive team are different. So for my marketing team, like will go deep, right. We'll say, okay, let's test the color of this cartoon person's hair on paid social to see if we get better engagement if the hair color is brown. I mean that level of detail, AB testing, and all marketers do this right. It's not something that so in all that time talking about, because who cares? Again, so what? But I do. But you're talking to a marketer. That's a type of insights that you need right as a market doesn't necessarily mean your sales team needs at or the executive team needs to hear it. So it's really understanding your audience, which is real number one of marketing. But when I'm talking to the other executives in my company, we're looking at numbers. I mean we're talking about lessons learned, we're talking about kind of things that we're excited about, what challenges exist, how can we overcome those challenges? And then, at the end of the day, like let's look at the retront on investment of the team. And so without sales there would be no return on investment. Like there is no unless it's an audit, you know, an online sign up or something like. Marketing is not in Asilo. But you're working with your teams, whether that's a Bedr or ae or, you know, at sales leaders, you're you need to be working together and so ensuring that they have what they need. The sales team has what they need from the marketing team and that there's a feedback loop is critical to being successful. But they're all slightly different conversations and their nuance conversations. Let's go with the slightly different between sales and maybe a C suite, like is there anything in particular there that you've noticed, because it is slightly different audiences, but we're all still kind of generally want in sales and c suite or paying attention to the bottom line and and the money. But I wonder if there's any other nuances that you've become aware of. Yeah, I mean I think the executive team sometimes can put marketing in to the sales bucket, like they may think costs of sales and market any team it's typically like a combined line item on your balance sheet. But marketing sales are so different, and so it's if you're talking to executives who don't have a marketing background her maybe we're sales peop like they might have a completely different view of what marketing does.

Then what you know? Somebody with a marketing background would know. So I would say when I'm having conversations with the sales team. We can. We can say, okay, let's basically coordinate touch points, like there's this big campaign going out, you're going to get a notification from sales force when this happens and here's your response and we we've written up all these flows for you, guys, and objection handling and everything's being tracked by sales force and Marquetto and visible and and so it's definitely a lot more tactical. Some people, the executives, love to hear the details. Don't get me wrong. I mean we're I'm lucky to have founders that care very deeply about marketing, but there's so much going on at any given time in a marketing org of any company that it would be impossible to have those granular conversations about every project or campaign that you're working on. So save those for your team. Yep, Yep. One thing I find talking specifically with CMOS is that they often are the one in marketing that got whether it's promoted or the reason that they are there is because they're good at tying numbers to what they're doing. And then you have other marketers who maybe they have aspirations of building a career in a maybe even moving into a position like that, but that mindset shift, it's like they're more focus on what you're talking about earlier, like the hair color or the person in that is, and it showing them kind of like the whole picture, getting them interested in the numbers. It can be like a more difficult kind of thing. I wonder how you've specifically in your career seen the benefit it's of like moving into this model win, I'm going to be able to prove our value. I'm going to go into the numbers and like show what we're doing overall for the growth of this company. Yeah, no, I think marketing is one of those roles that everyone thinks that they can do because everyone can come up with a great idea. Like there's there's some really you know, you get a bunch of people in a room like what do you think we should do for this advertisement? Like you're going to get some really cool ideas from people that aren't on the marketing team. Or I saw this at my old company. You know, there's a lot of that. But what makes marketers good is consistency. Like we have one hit wonders in the marketing world, right. I mean we have people that do a great campaign or advertising agencies to do a great campaign and then they sort of just disappear, a fall off the mountain and they can't repeat it. And so I like the small winds and being able to tie them to consistent performance over time, and that's what every investor is looking for. Like what's repeatable about this model? I can go to my executive team and say, here's what's repeatable about my model, like we're pulling from information and tracking that we've had over the course of two years or three years or whatever, and I can tell you that if we do Xy, is going to happen at a high level. Right, there's always, you know, kind of things that come up and you don't know everything, but you should be able to have a good sense of what you can do and it should be repeatable and scalable. You know, every every now and then I have a great idea and I my team does and we say, okay, let's try it for this campaign and we realize it only works because it's bespoke and and that's great for...

...your high value contacts, right. It's great for the CMOS that you're trying to reach, let's say, selling into, like they're probably not going to click on your ads, and so you have to come up with something really creative. But it's highly manual and that's okay, but if that's all you're doing, you're going to have a hard time proving value. And the same if only you're doing this evergreen, always on marketing approach, the numbers go up and now and that's just that's just life. You know you're going to have an off month, like maybe something got stuck in paid searched and you know a campaign got shut off, or maybe you know some news item happen and people aren't paying attention right now to what you're selling, and that's great. That's why you need that. You know that history of performance and that's what says the great mercury part. I love the words you use, their consistency, small winds, repeatable, scalable. I think that's definitely where the conversation should be. Not always does, isn't always where it is. Anything that you would say to let's say, hypothetically, I'm a director of marketing and I'm getting maybe some heat from the sea sweet because they want to see proof of value. So we use these words right, consistency or small winds repeatable and if someone's going okay, I got to prove value, they're going Christy. Where should I start or what should I be tracking immediately? Like what's that in road? Yeah, so it's like if you fail, the plan you you're going to you should plan to fail. Like there's Yo, there's not anything that you should be doing that doesn't have some sort of expected outcome. Remember when we were in elementary school, maybe we had signed projects and we've always had to write our hypothesis of what was going to happen right at the same is true for every campaign that you launch. You should have what the goal is like, even if it's a small thing, because otherwise, know if you hit that goal? So I would say if you're not doing those things, start doing them, especially to this hypothetical director of marketing, like before you launch anything, especially when you're spending money, you should have some form of forecasting of what's going to happen. How do you start? Well, you need to get some great tracking software or you need to make sure that you have others in the company like that you're working with that can speak to the success of the campaign, like working directly with your sales team, like understanding what it is that they need. Let them be the advocate for you. You know, I think you know, marketers don't have to run up and say, you know, look what I did, like put this on the refrigerator with a magnet, like you know. It's much better to have those third parties kind of come and say this was a really great team effort from marketing, and that's to me is I'll take that win any day the week. HMM. Was We start to wrap up here. I love again, I think the last few minutes here specifically, I'm going I we definitely the consistency pieces what makes great marketers stand out amongst just like good markers, because a lot of people do have that story. They could tell you about the one campaign they ran that one time. So I love that you pointed that out. As people walk away from this episode, maybe, well, I usually jog, so I'm imagining someone running and they're listening to this and as they're finishing up listening to US talk today. Chrissy, anything...

...you want to leave us with as far as final thoughts around our attribution model, things that we're tracking maybe it's a start stop. Any final thoughts here before we close out today? I well, I would say there's never been a better time to be a marketer. Ever. Ever, this is and it's only going to get better. I think marketing has rightfully earned our seat at the table. It's no longer view to be this. You know, a marketer is this creative genius who's kind of like out here and dresses in Hawaiian tshirts and, you know, write a motorcycle that you like see in the movies and stuff like. That's not reality. It's, you know, people who, yes, creativity helps, but you can train yourself to be a good marketer, like you can, and there's so many resources out there right now where you can get educated on on what's going on and in the space and like you know what some of the new things are. There's free courses right to become a marketer. It's it's a really wonderful time to be to be here, and so I'm grateful that I landed in this, this field. That's it's all I've ever wanted and I I can't express how much I love it. I was talking to the CFO the other day and I was like. Is it weird that I don't have a lot of hobbies like like if I'm not if I'm not working, I'm sort of like studying and I just love it. But it's important to be a lifelong learner in marketing and and you will. You will be successful. You just got to keep out it. It's good leaving us with some hope today. I appreciate that too. Let's jump here as we wrap up. Talk to us a little bit about impactcom, and then also, where can people stay connected with you and the work that you're doing? Sure so. Impactcom is a the leading partnership management platform. We help businesses grow revenue through partnerships. So partnerships mean influencers, other businesses, affiliates, referral marketing is what you know. Some people have called it in the past, but it's not just one thing. It's leveraging other people who have maybe an insight or a particular audience or some talent or software integration or something that you know you can use to benefit your business, giving them something in return, largely and mostly a commission, although sometimes product is what the incentive is. In the influencer space. I know a lot of brands will send product and kind of ask for them to to review them. But authenticity plays a huge role and so so finding a good partner that can refer you business and and that you can do something for them and it's a right fit. That's sort of what we're trying to drive education and awareness around. You can find partners in our market place, you can contract with them, you can recruit them into your program you start tracking, doing all the measurement, paying them. Everything can be done through impactcom and we work with some of the greatest brands in the entire world. So I feel like I'm very lucky to have this job and the company is a fantastic place, but we're definitely checking along here. Partnerships have exploded over the past couple of years, I think, largely due to, I believe that e...

...commerce exploding right so anyone who's driving sales for e commerce is also doing pretty well these days. HMM, Christy, how can people connect with you as Linkedin best or what would you say there? It is so I'm I have a weird Christine name. There's no age. It's Cristi Christy Garcia. You can find me on Linkedin and yeah, I'd love to connect with any marketers who want to have a conversation. Appreciate you stopping by B Tob Growth. This has been a really fun conversation than spend. I really appreciate it. Thank you for all of our listeners who are tuned in today. I appreciate you listening. We hope that these conversations help fuel your growth, help continue to make you more innovative in the work that you're doing. Don't miss an episode. If you have yet to subscribe to the show, do that on whatever podcast player is your favorite. You can connect with me as well over on Linkedin. Just Search Benjie Block. I'm talking about business, marketing in life over there and would love to connect with you. Keep doing work that matters and will be back real soon with another episode. Christie, thanks again for being here. Be Tob growth is brought to you by the team at sweet fish media. Here at sweet fish, we produce podcast for some of the most innovative brands in the world and we help them turn those podcasts into Microvideos, linkedin content, blog posts and more. We're on a mission to produce every leader's favorite show. Want more information, visit Sweet Fish Mediacom.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (1751)