What Would You Give Up Your Email To Get Access To? | Original Research

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We spoke with 100 marketing leaders and asked "What was the last resource you gave up your email to get access to?" In this roundtable discussion Benji, James, Dan, and Logan breakdown the findings.  

Discussed in this episode: 

  • The content, events, and tools B2B marketers want in their inbox
  • The right time for gated content
  • Making your content so good that people are eager to give up their email to access it  

Sponsors:  

If you’re hiring, you need Indeed.

Sign up and get a $75 credit to sponsor your first job for better visibility, more applications and quicker hiring times. Stay in control with payment billing options, no long term contracts, pay for only what you need and pause spending at any time.* 

Claim Your Credit 

*Sponsored Job credit offers available only for new U.S. accounts posting a job that expires one year after account creation. Upon expiration of credits, users are charged based on their Sponsored Job budget. Terms, conditions, and quality standards apply.

Conversations from the front lines and marketing. This is B two B growth. Welcome in on today's episode, James Dan and I are here and set to discuss some resources, uh, that marketers give up their email to get access to. And so what we did, if you're new to this format, we asked a hundred B two B marketing leaders a few questions, about fifteen questions, and one of them was what was last resource you gave up your email to get access to? And then we're just gonna discuss the answers we heard and what were the things for us that we're willing to give up our email addressed for and and have something hit our inbox. And so I know if you're listening to this, you're probably thinking, man, the inbox is a complex space. That's what I think newsletters are like. All the rage and at the same time, so much spam. It's everywhere you look up. Your inboxes flooded and James, I know it was in the last couple of weeks you actually brought this uff that you're like hiring someone to help you with your inbox. Tell me how that's going, because I know you're fairly opinionated on that. Topic. Yeah, so I just hired a woman named Katilla and she started this week actually, and it's been she's she's been a godsend. We jump on a call for fifteen minutes a day and she talks through the chaos that is my inbox, and a lot of it is just like yeah, unsubscribed from that, unsubscribed from that, unsubscribed from that, like the thing I wanted from them was super helpful when I needed it and now they're peppering me with stuff that, you know, I don't want anymore. So, uh, yeah, it's definitely top of mind. I've been thinking a lot about you know it, just as as we hammer down and really focus on turning B two B growth into the go to media property for B Two B marketers, we've got to figure out how to email well and uh, and we haven't figured it out yet. So I'm excited to dive into this and see what a hundred of these folks said. Yeah, Dan, what was the last thing? Like, I'm just gonna give the question to you. What's the last resource you give up your email to get access to? Sure, hold on, think about it. Something from income school. It was creator science. He has a newsletter and I specifically just wanted to see his funnel, like I wanted. He he specifically pitched like how a newsletter could be the biggest growth engine for your podcast. So naturally I'm like what? I go to his website, I give up my email and honestly, the pitch for getting on the email was really compelling. And I've gotten one email. He was really light on the auto responders, and I've gotten one of his newsletters and I'm like it's actually pretty good, like I think I'd like. It's good enough that I'm like, I think I want to read the next one. His next three better be good, otherwise I'll probably unsubscribe because I've kind of learned what I needed to learn. But he definitely sold me on it and now I'm in his I'm in his newsletter.

Is that J Klaus? H J Klaus? Yeah, yeah, he has been somebody that that I've connected with a few times now. He's the host of a show called creative elements, and so check out Ja. It's just J CLAUS DOT COM, C L O U S E Dot Com. I know he spoke at podcast movement last week while we were there and I didn't go to that talk, but I heard fantastic things about it from cody and Dan. Yeah, I heard last week he was on marketing millennials and I was listening to him just super well informed, even on just creator economy and all sorts of things over there. So definitely check them out. Okay, so I was thinking about this personally this morning and I jotted down a few things that I think I've given up my email for recently. One of them was like a personal development. So this is outside of marketing, maybe a little outside of business, but it was like core values type newsletter, an assessment that then drove me to like give up my email right and then their drip after that has actually been really informative because it's personalized. So I was like, well, I would want this type of email in my inbox because it's personal to me. And so I'm thinking about it from a marketing perspective and I'm like the way they tied these things together and then other assessments that they have are further down, like ways that they would connect me to actually purchase some of their products, made a lot of sense because of the personal nature of it. And then on the marketing side, I was thinking about Devin Reid when he just recently left Gong and I was like, Oh man, I connected with Devon. I liked the conversation. He has some really compelling content. I know he has a newsletter. I hadn't subscribed it. I want to follow his career and I know he does not flood the INBOX. It's like a one email a week. It's usually pretty short. It's like okay, that's something I'd be willing to give it up for. And then outside of that it's usually an email to learn a specific skill. So it's like I remember being a social media like marketer and wanting to like really figure out what's a good way to do content planning, and so I would get some pdf, some resource and then, like James said, I've done subscribe so so that it's usually to get like a resource like that. James, what about you, man, because if you're cleaning out your inbox, I know you're also a resource guy, so it's really easy probably for you to like, Oh, I want to try this, so you give up your email and then you gotta go back and unsubscribe later. But what's what's the last thing you gave up your email for? I've gotten a lot more selective because it just gets so out of hand. And then, but when we were at podcast movement there was a panel that we went to, actually I went to with Dan, and one of the women on the panel shouted out a podcast specific newsletter about the podcast industry. I can't even remember what the name is now. I think I've only gotten one email from them, but she just praised from the stage how good this newsletter was and since it's specifically about the podcast industry, that was the last thing I gave up my email for. Yeah, I was podcasting. There's a couple that of those newsletters that hit my inbox and I'll read through them. I think this goes back to also how do we think about our inbox? Like? That's a bit of a broader question and I do want to take us there after we...

...look at these results, because I think that plays into this. And do you really want to be hit with information there consistently when you're like trying to clean out the inbox and also responding to people? It's like you have to think about it in a specific way. So, okay, the results that we saw, I'm gonna break it into three categories. But first I'll read some specific answers. And again this is a hundred B two b marketers telling you what's the last thing they gave up their email for. So it was things like loom. So that's a product like basically a p LG motion free trial type deal, objection handling help. I'm assuming that's some sort of PDF format benchmark report. Again, you're talking about like a White Paper or a PDF morning brew, marketing brew. That's when we could harp on a lot, because that's a newsletter that a lot of people subscribe to and a lot of people find value in. Hubspot state of e D M report, competitive solution. And then another just like general e D F email deliverable on engagement, e book on Best Practices and marketing operations. That goes back to what I was saying right about like Oh, this content calendar, those types of downloads. You have a masterclass social strategy, content sub stack, some newsletter, Webinar. Of all of those, if I'm boiling them down, looking at how I would group them, I would say the most popular answer is related to content. Second, basically as events, and then that that would include online like virtual events, as obviously, and then tools would be third. As you guys see the list and you see those three categories, like anything stand out to you? James? I think that makes sense. I mean I've seen metadata. I've seen the ADS in my linkedin feed for probably the last month now of them promoting this demand event. I remember they they I think they executed on it pretty well last year from what I heard people talk about. I didn't attend the event. I don't tend to attend those type of things. I don't not because I think they're bad, I just not necessarily interested in it. So that checks out to me. When I think about giving up my email address, I don't necessarily think about it like a tool, like if I were signing up for loom, I wouldn't in my mind think like Oh, I have to give up my email address to get this. I would just like okay, well, that's how I log into the tool. So I don't know if if I would necessarily, you know, if if I were being surveyed. Obviously, you know the folks we talked to mentioned tools. So clearly, UH, other people are considering it that way. But but yeah, I think it checks out to me. The reason I included it is because when you think of like the P L G motion and can was actually a good example of this, because I am a paid user, but I'm also I also have a free account. So it's kind of this weird where like they hit me thinking that I'm not in and up, but I actually am in, and the drips that they hit me with because they have my email, they're always showing me things and...

...they're in my inbox consistently because they don't think I've paid yet. So I think you're right, like you're you're signing up to get a log in, but they're they're thinking is also a marketing play and the hubspot has honestly done that execution really, really well by specifically creating free tools, as an email capture mechanism. So I forget. I think they did like a website greater. Maybe it was it was either a hubspot or co schedule that did like a website greater, where it was a tool that would analyze your website. There's a headline a blog headline analyzer, so you could put in like a topic and it would spit out fifteen like potential blog headlines. So like things like that I think are really interesting. Dan What are your initial thoughts on those three categories, when you have content, events and then the tools, which we touched on briefly there? Yeah, I see. I definitely see it in my own email behavior right I'm definitely giving up my email for those three things. I do see events as kind of like content, and oftentimes even some of the people who said like the people who are giving it up for a Webinar, often giving up their email not so they can be at their Webinar but so they can get the recording and the deck afterwards, because I think a lot of other people are the similar and that they freaking hate webinars and just would rather watch it on two x speed. You can skip the pitch right later. Yeah, the one thing that was interesting to me is if you thought about it in like what was most popular, and you could almost think of it as like a funnel, if most popular was like content sort of at the top, and then events it's a little bit of like a harder lift to pull off. Like obviously content that is is quality. I'm not saying there's no lift to that. There is, but content is the one that's like the easiest in and then events doing that really well that's going to be harder tools. It's like, well, this is like something that probably you're ultimately wanting them to pay for, so that's gonna be like the most lift. So it kind of made sense to me and you could think of it in like a funnel of sorts. Let's go first to how we think about our inbox and then we'll go to recommendations, because this is a key part. Is, like I personally do not want to be hit by different categories of things in my inbox. I like knowing like I'm responding to people outside of sweet fish in my inbox. That's the first thing that's most important is what are the conversations I'm having externally, internal conversations on slack. So when when a newsletter hits, because I'm someone that's prone to a D H d. A newsletter hits my inbox and I'm like, when do I read this? Because this isn't a task. This could suck me into some black hole of content that I didn't mean to go down on this format. So how do you guys think about your your inbox and like what you actually want to hit it? And then the follow up question to that is like, let's say you let morning Brew, Marketing Brew Into Your Inbox. When are you consuming that content and, like, are you just skimming? I know that's a lot, but I want to get into the mindset...

...of how you think about some of the things. You've given up your email address or and Dan, I'll let you go first on this one. Absolutely, I don't know. I have a personal email box and I have a work email box. All the newsletters and content go to the personal email box and that's how I kind of keep it a little cleaner. The type of content other than like work and collaboration, like actual work being done in the email box. There is another kind of where it's like spam outreach to get on B two B growth to me is all spam, and then there's another category of like updates from tools that I use all those companies because they have my email address, and it's companies from Riverside like we're on now. It's from Hubspot, it's from descript, it's from all my tools and I'll honestly most of them I just delete a spam, but there are a few like essentially Riverside descript. I'm on the edge of my chair waiting to see what like feature they're dropping next. So I always look for them, I open them up, read them and the delete everything else. Those are tools that I'm using so often that I'm really interested in whatever features are launching and I don't even care if they if they give me content of like how to be a better podcaster instantly, but if it's like a tool update of like here's a new feature we have coming out, I'm like, Oh, what's that? So I look at those differently. Yeah, that's that's actually really interesting that you focused on that, because people might not be thinking that way when they're creating content. But I'd say I'm the same from those those companies, where I don't need you to tell me like yeah, like I don't need a listical from you. I don't need I don't need like why this content works. I need like, Oh, have you tried this yet in our our tool, because this is how it could up level the content you're already creating, James, like how do you as you you know you're handing it off, but there's still that element of like I think you and I are probably similar in this way, where, like, when you just see the overwhelm of it, you could just click on it and like look at it and then be like Oh what, wait, what the heck was I doing? I feel like we maybe that you can totally shoot me down at that. That's usually what happens to me. I'll be trying to wind down the day and before I passed my inbox off, I would be winding down the day and and get into so many rabbit trails that I was like, you know what, there's a better way to do this. A guy named Gino Wickham, who engineered the EOS model that we run our company on, he kind of shared this system. He was like, email is a an our task and if you, as a business leader, if your value to your organization is more than twenty five dollars an hour, which it should be if you're the leader of an organization, you need to be figuring out another method for processing your email. And so that challenge was really powerful for me. That was when I really started considering like hey, I don't need to be doing our work. And so now I am like yesterday I was on my Peloton working out, doing something that I need to do anyway, and I had a phone call with Katilla and she's like, okay, Samantha Stone reached out. She said this she's not been happy with some of the video stuff...

...that she's getting from, you know, this vendor she's using. I wanted to see if she could potentially work with sweet fish on it. Samantha is an old friend, former client referral partner for us. So I'm like, yeah, the center my calendle link. Let's let's get something on the calendar. But I'm talking that through with Katilla while I'm on my bike. So it's not I would not have been able to process my email like that prior to actually having someone talk through it with me. Plus I'm a verbal processor, so for me personally, talking through something is way easier. And then she just responds on my behalf and make sure that whoever she's communicating with knows that it's not me, that it's her that they're talking to, and so I feel really good about that. So that's something that that the way I think about you know, the same, same as you, Benji. Internal Communications obviously happening in slack. External Communications is email and I honestly I try to get people into text messages, like if it's something that I know is really a Warton I'm trying to get it into text messages as quickly as possible because I know that like I'm training myself to not even look at my inbox, like that's not even something I want to I want to look at anymore. I'm just gonna have Katilla processing all of that and talking me through what needs to happen so that that's not even in my life. Yeah, I think that all of that is really good context. And then for me it just takes me to newsletters, because that came up a lot. It's like, okay, so if that's the way that we're consuming like industry news. So for us we're in the B two B podcasting space, but we're looking at podcasting more broadly trends. What are people doing, what are people trying? So I have a few of those that hit my inbox from like okay, just like have some time where all you're doing is looking at that content. And actually I found it's just easier to just go to those websites than even let them infiltrate my my inbox. But there's there's gotta be a way or like, even if it's just twenty minutes on your calendar, where like that's when you look at your newsletters and the bar for newsletters is like skyrocketing because so many people are getting in the game. That unless you have like a team like again, like a morning bruise is the perfect example, because they're at such scale now where you're like, okay, they were early into this, they're they're great at it and I'm gonna want their content. It's it's uh, it's got to be a pretty heavy lift to just go in there. You know, you can say morning Bruce Newsletter is great because they're now at scale and they're big. Newsletter was great when they were a team of like two dudes that went to University of Michigan. Like they put in the effort to create a quality product in the inbox that nobody else was putting out, and so they were curating all of these highlights from HBR and all all these like news aggregators and they just wrote it in a millennial way that was engaging to a big group of people. And I just don't think most companies think about email content in that way. It's a throwaway thing. They...

...don't put premise development into it, they don't plan it out the way they plan other pieces of their content. At least. I don't hear anybody talking about that, and I think there needs to be a great deal. I mean, to get into someone's Inbox, as we've seen in this data, not that hard to do. To stay in someone's inbox very hard to do. And so if if you're going to use email as an affinity building tool, you have to come up with a compelling enough hook that somebody is gonna want when they when they see your name in their inbox, they're going to want to open it up. And and that is no small feat to figure that out. Yeah, that was said very well. That's that is the first recommendation we have. We have to give away, and I think you just did it so well. It's just saying, like, if you're gonna get into the game here or if you are like be thinking through premise. We talk about that in the podcast content. You are in the podcast like realm, because that's that's where we we live and breathe, right, but then when you think of email, same thing applies. Premises everything, knowing your P O v, I mean in written form too, there's something to be said about it's kind of harder in a lot of ways because people's attention spans. But Yeah, you, you definitely need that differentiated P O v and you need to know where you're where you're taking people that are are subscribing. So I really like that. I think the way we've said it recently is that marketers are obviously we're gonna be willing to give up our email for content that gives us an unfair advantage, and I love that language that we've we've been using. But like an unfair advantage at work, because I clicked on your email and you gave me some strategy, you gave me something that's been working really well for you. The content is is just a high quality of course, like that's the type of stuff that I even in my a d h d moments where I'm clicking on it. I'm clicking on it because I know you're gonna give me quality. I know you're gonna give me something that actually could help my my work today, tomorrow, next week. So that is kind of what you're driving in. Yeah, one thing that combines those two things, Benji. You know, giving someone an unfair advantage of work with premise development. There was a newsletter that I joined a few years ago I'm not on it anymore because I stopped thinking about ads as much. But they were basically a facebook ads agency and their newsletter was just they curated the best facebook ads that they had come across. I don't know for examples. Yeah, it was just examples of really compelling facebook AD creative and that that level of specificity, I was like yeah, I want to see three exceptional examples of facebook ad creative in my inbox every week, and so I signed up and for a long time, for probably a year or two, I stayed on that email list. Now, the season of the business change, I wasn't thinking as much about that. Now now I actually that we're diving into Linkedin ads. I would love to see somebody have a newsletter of just brilliant linkedin AD creative because most ad creative, at least the stuff that showing up in my feed, is our ush and that's what we're talking about...

...when we say like, have a premise, have a hook, like what is the and I think a lot of times it's just like getting really granular and specific with the type of value that you could offer. I don't know, for us, because we're in the podcast space, would it be like, Hey, we're going to share three different podcasts. That should be on your radar. Like I don't know if that's like too broad, because podcasts have obviously lots of content within them, maybe not as compelling as like being able to look at a piece of Linkedin ad creative or three sets of that, but anyway, I think that example of the facebook ad creative pairs your recommendation with mine really well. It's funny because, Benji, you just said it a minute ago that it's emails a little harder because of its written nature, but I'm like, I don't know, there's a lot of great newsletters that are actually more visual in nature, even if there's written content to go along with it, kind of like the one james just mentioned, an email with, you know, it's it's basic html, which means you can still get in there graphics, good visual content well, and videos, getting easier via email to even links to videos or curated links to other places. Yea, yeah, I think video is like also, you can now imbed that in an email very easily and if someone is already connected to you, like there's a million ways to do a newsletter. So I shouldn't just just make it like about written. I think written has some complexity to it, but you don't have to just take it that round. So that's a good point. Dan. On your side of things, I know we had mentioned in the last couple of weeks talking about gated content and your your opinions there, but that obviously is part of the discussion. If someone is willing to give up their email, they're doing what you would do with gated content. So how do you think about that and how does it like, even for what we're doing at sweet fish? How does it play when it comes to email strategy? And, like I've said before, I think there's definitely a time and a place for gated content. I'm a huge fan of gated content if the content you're delivering after the fact is actually good content and the drip sequence isn't forever. You know, I think a good drip sequence probably goes I don't know, maybe two weeks. Depends, not like fifty emails in two weeks. Depends on the quality and like what they did to get to that point of the drip sequence, but like a lot of factors. But you can deliver a good drip sequence and it can be more than one or two. Like you could probably do it over two weeks and still be okay. After two weeks I've noticed as a pretty big drop off and like just opening it. So but if the content is really good, it could be really helpful because hopefully the place, the thing you know, where you kind of have an idea of where they're at and they're buying journey, not even buying journey, where they're not on their journey right where they're trying to figure things out because they download it or requesting this piece of content. You can kind of like give context to where they're at. You can help them down their journey, or at least down a little path of their journey, a little shortcut, and I think a good drip sequence. I'm from gated content is a great way to do that. Again, it has to deliver value and what too many B TB companies do is just trip it up the sales.

But that's what I would avoid at all costs. You should only give things to sales when people are actually requesting sales information or sales help, something specifically related to the product. They're not asking about your product. Don't send them to sales and sales doesn't want them. So stop doing that. Okay. We talked a lot about content and we had those three categories, right, so you had content, events and then tools. James, when it comes to the event side of things, is you hear this, this data as you're looking at this original research? Does it change your mind you? Do you see any insights here on how it might change our our event approach? Yeah, so I hear Chris Walker actually talking about the need to the ways you should be measuring engagement is like, how many people continually show up to your weekly event that you're doing? So he did, I think it was stated a bandage in live. That was his waterfall content. That turned into his podcast and you know his linkedin videos, who do this weekly, weekly live call where people could ask him questions and it was a great source of content. Doing it on Tiktok now. Yeah, he's doing it on Tiktok now. TIKTOK lives. And so he would tell you that to measure engagement in environment, to know if your content is actually good or not, how many of the same people are showing up week after week after week? What our data told us, the insights that we pulled from it, where that people actually really enjoy signing up for an event but then streaming that on their own time. It's the Netflix effect right, like we don't want to be held hostage to being on somebody else's timetable. We want to consume our content when we want to consume it, and I am a raving Chris Walker Fan. You might not find a bigger Chris Walker Fan than me. I have never one time showed up on his on his live thing, like I listened to the podcast, I watched his videos and in feed on Linkedin and I watch it on my time whenever I'm ready to consume content. I'm not going to show up to something at Tuesday at seven PM, like that's my family time, that's time that is non negotiable for me, and even if it was at two in the afternoon on Tuesday, I still wouldn't show up. I've got other things to do. And so I don't disagree with him that a good engagement metric is to look and see who is showing up to your event if it's an ongoing event, because obviously the content is probably good if if you've got people showing up over and over again. But I wouldn't necessarily like look at that as the only way to measure success be looking at who is who is consuming that replay, whether you're using a tool like whistya. I think you'd probably even do it on Youtube and see like, okay, when we send out the replay, are people actually watching this? With Youtube and with whisty, I'm sure you can get a feel for watch time and and how much of that content are they act really consuming. But yeah,...

...that that was one takeaway that stood out to me. Yeah, ultimately, what we're coming back to a lot is the quality of content and then partnering that with making like the people that are on the other side of that. Like you can think it's quality, but it's another thing to have your audience think it's quality and how you get that feedback and then let that inform the events that you're doing, inform the content you're creating, the tools all that. I was listening to a podcast the other day Benji called media moves, and this guy started a media company called Work Week and on this particular episode he does like five minute episodes, I think, two or three times a week. It's for folks interested in the media industry. It's a it's a no brainer to check that show out. But he was saying that he has a specific person in his mind. So before he goes to record an episode, he's like got his topic down, he knows what he's gonna say, or he has a good idea of what he's gonna say. But he asks himself. I think it's his friend Mike, and his friend Mike is like a really, really smart person in media, like they have really high level conversation, strategic conversations about the media industry, and he asks himself. He's like, if Mike heard this episode, would Mike Think this is good? Would this help Mike Spark a conversation with his peers about this topic? That's a good question, and so I just thought that was a really helpful like litmus test as as we create content, like who is the person in your mind that you are creating this for and if that person is similar to ideally that person is similar to the type of people you're trying to influence with your content. But having that specific person in mind, it's like, okay, if I brought this up at lunch tomorrow, would this be an interesting conversation? Would this be a conversation that they would go on and want to have with their peers. I thought that was a really just speaking of quality content, but that was a really practical way to make sure that you're your quality. That's a high bar. Yeah, and and if you're in a B Two B organization that has some sort of a B M approach, you know exactly who you're making content for. So you have no excuse. You could, you can pull some people out. You know who you want to not I wouldn't say just impressed, but who you want to like help who is positioned at that's the best way I would I think I can say it. Okay. So, after everything we've discussed, I think I want to wrap up with we don't do a ton with email. So if you're looking at everything that we the hundred marketers that we surveyed and all this data and all these these are potential takeaways. And we're talking about gated content and our inboxes and you look at tools and you look at events, you look at content. Okay, how does it inform sweet fish moving forward? What are the things that for us, we're going okay, because we had this discussion, it has changed my mind, maybe slightly, on on how we think about...

...email or who maybe we should try this. Did it get any gears turning internally for you, Dan? Well, as it pertains to like. Okay, this is what we're seeing in the market and this is how it should inform us. From what we're learning from this research and partly what I just learned from J Klaus at podcast movement like emails become top of mind for me because what I've discovered is that people are willing to give up their email. Yes, we're all bashing gated content on Linkedin, but people are still doing it. The cool thing is is that people it's a good baby step and I've what I've realized is getting someone to listen to a freaking forty sixty minute long podcast episode is a big ask and there's a lot of equivalence to watching a Webinar, to watching a youtube video, anything that's more than like a thirty second to three minute clip on social like at most. It's a big ask. Giving up an email is less of an ask. You wouldn't think so, because you're giving up like a sense of privacy and all that kind of stuff, but it's just is. It's it's a low friction. All the tools have made it really easy to draw up your first name and email and click subscribe. It's just easier. So, therefore it is a fantastic in between for your short form content and your long form content, and this is how I'm thinking about it now. I'm like, Damn, BBB growth, we've like started and stopped a newsletter at least twice now and I'm like, oh, but it's time to bring it back because as a show we're freaking killing it on Linkedin and then we're doing great on the podcast. We need the middle link. So this is something I'm gonna be harpened about for a while, probably on Linkedin, probably with our customers, starting right now with bdb growth. Is that an email is the best in between between your short form and your long form content. But based on everything else we're saying, it's still has to be good content. It can't just be a cheap pack in between. People will know they'll drop off and they're not gonna get to your long form content. They might not even like your short form content because you screwed up somewhere. And I can think of people's emails that I've signed up for with high anticipation and honestly it wasn't any good. I won't call out any names, but I'm thinking of a few people who are top marketers right now that I signed up for their newsletter. I'm on something signed up and I don't even pay attention to their social anymore. I think about one newsletter, Benji, that I've stayed on actually for now several years, and it's the market tooonist and every week, I think it's every Monday, I get an email in my inbox. It's a visual graphic and it's it's basically a cartoon like you would read in the funny papers, but it's specifically for marketers. That probably, that single email probably drives that guy's entire business. Because when you have, when you have an email newsletter or or an email mechanism in your marketing mix that has that kind of specificity, you can now start to run ads. I think this is what Jay Klaus was talking about two in that session. You can run advertising to get people onto your newsletter. But that newsletter it's not just like sign up for my newsletter, it's like Hey, do you want? Do you want a funny comic strip in your inbox once a week about life as a marketer. Yeah, I want that. I'm not signing up for another news letter. I'm signing up...

...for a funny comic Strip in my inbox. It is delivered via email, but I've now watched that guy's Ted talk or Ted x talk. I have consumed more of that guy's now. I don't think he puts out a lot of long form content. But for for us, like if we can figure out what our Hook is for B twob growth, that we could actually run ads against and say, Hey, do you want this in your inbox every week? If so, sign up here. Well, now we deliver on that. But then we can also point people to Dan Myself, your linkedin profiles, we can point people to what we're doing on Youtube when we start developing that. We can point them to like, obviously, the PODCAST, but getting them on that email, I think, is a really strategic would be a really strategic move for us. We just need to put a lot of thought into what is the hook that's going to actually get somebody to want to sign up for that, because if it's just regurgitating, Hey, these were the three episodes we dropped this week. Like people that subscribe to the like you used to stry to the podcast and figure out what what episodes we dropped. Like we need to do something more than just the regurgitated kind of throw it check the box of email. So like, Oh yeah, we we have an email newsletter. It's not enough to check the box. You have to be very, very thoughtful about what that email is. It's not enough to check the box. I like that that's a mic drop moment here at the end of this B two B growth episode. I think when we think of original research and the episodes we've done so far, we've come back to strategy and focus and having a unique p o v. over and over and over again we're hitting it from a different angle as we talk about email on this episode, but ultimately that's what we're driving home. Like you don't start something like this and get good at it just haphazardly. You're not gonna just wind up with an email that is really high performing quality content if you don't put in the strategy, if you don't have focus on why that's a medium you actually want to tackle and get good at. So, as we think about we would give up our email for you can just reverse engineer that, and that's why I loved this conversation today and we're always having conversations like this on B two B growth. We wanted to be insightful, we wanted to hit home for you right where you're at in your B Two b marketing journey, and I think hopefully today hit that mark for you. Uh, if you have an email resource that you really enjoy that hits your inbox, reach out to Dan, reach out to James, reach out to myself on Linkedin. Tell us a little bit about it, tell us what you thought about this episode. We'd love to chat with you about marketing over on Linkedin and we'll be back real soon with another episode. Cheers. We're always excited to have conversations with leaders on the front lines of marketing. If there's a marketing director or a chief marketing officer that you think we need to have on the show, reach out email me, Benji dot block at Sweet Fish Media...

Dot Com. I look forward to hearing from you. m.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (1805)