B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2110 · 2 months ago

What's Working Now On LinkedIn (& What Isn't)

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez talks to Sweet Fish Media's in-house writer, Emily Dibrito, about the trends she's seeing on LinkedIn. Emily is the main source for many of the posts seen on LinkedIn from the Sweet Fish team and the person behind the LinkedIn Evangelist Program.

Yeah, welcome back to be, to be growth. I'mdan Sanchez with Sweet fish Media. And today I'm joined by an internal teammember here at Sweet Fish Media and I'm stoked to have her on because she'skind of like the wizard behind the curtain, you know, it's like she's themystery behind a lot of what's going on with our linkedin content for Sweetfish Media. And I will say a lot of people, a lot of people are finding usto Lincoln that's kind of become our primary channel. Of course me to begrowth here. This podcast is a primary channel, but you always need a like aShort form channel in order to get a podcast discovered. And for us it'slinked in, we've been writing lots of content there, a few of us on theleadership team. Um, and now we just kicked it off with 13 employees,including a few of us that have been on there for a while are now activeevangelists on linkedin and Emily de Brito here is the one writing a lot ofthat content. About half the content for our evangelists. Probably like a3rd 3rd of my content Emily is writing. So you think it's me and it's probablymy idea maybe, but it's actually from Emily, and a lot of my most viral postshave actually come through Emily because she's a better writer and hasway funnier content. So I wanted to have her on the BdB growth show becauseI'm like, man, people need to hear from Emily, she's really great at coming upwith content for linkedin, but social media in general. So today I wanted tocover five things people do or don't do that often lead to their linkedincontent. Getting zero engagement after having meeting after meeting withcustomers, I inevitably go to their host profile, see that they're notdoing a lot of different things and conclude like, oh, this is why yourpodcasts and growing, because you're not actually doing linkedin, You sayyou're doing it, but you're not doing it. But Emily is in it every day,working with multiple people. Writing content for lots of people. So, Emily,I'd love to hear from you. Like what are the biggest things that you'reoften seeing people? Like, what mistakes are they're making in order toget ignored? Essentially, they're not getting any engagement on their posts.What are you seeing? Yeah, okay, so johnson right into it. I think we'llstart with the first thing is that the content that they're posting has novalue or it's not informative enough. Um I see this a lot where people sortof treat lengthen like a journal and they kind of just fill out what they'rethinking without thinking about the audience that they're writing for. Andso I should kind of combine two in there. It's not relevant to youraudience and it's not valuable, but I think it's something that you do reallywell dan, is that you want your content to be helpful, that's something that'simportant to you and part of your brand. Um and I think that that's importantbecause if your audience can't take something away from it, then they don'thave a reason to care about it and they certainly don't have a reason to engagewith it. Um and it's not going to help them get better at their job, so it's,it's kind of useless. Kind of makes sense though. I mean if a lot of peopledon't have a background in content marketing, which many don't, andthey've been used to posting to facebook instagram, you know, it's kindof personal mediums, you're just kind of like, hey, this is what happened,hey, the funniest thing happened, but it's, it's only interesting to peoplewho know you, but if you want to start building an audience on linkedin, it'skind of like, well, they don't know you, so why would they care? And that's thetricky part is figuring out what do you have to offer that would make someonecare, which is usually through being helpful. What are some ways people canbe helpful if they have not explored that before? Yeah, So I think animportant thing is to go through sort of a, you know, a P O. V discovery forthe evangelists, for the people writing on linkedin, because a lot of peoplethat I talk to you and like our kickoff calls, like I just don't know what towrite about, but they have so much experience and expertise that you startto take it for granted because you're so close to it, right? Like you're like,this is just what I do every day, like why wouldn't even care about this? Butthere are tips and tricks that you use...

...in your job that someone might not knowabout. So I think you can't underestimate really any, any part ofyour expertise because you don't know who needs to hear it. And I think Iheard in a podcast that you did, I don't remember who it was with, butit's about telling story and he was saying like speak to who you weremonths ago, four years ago and like what did you need to hear in thatprocess? So speaking to where you've been or speaking to other people whoare just a step behind you I think is an important thing to keep in the frontof your minds. And then I think it's important to have a strong opinion orstrong perspectives to stand on and be a little provocative, even like getsome good discussions going, get people to disagree with you and you know, putthat kind of content out there. It's fun to be provocative and just throwout these like broad brushstrokes statements, especially if they're kindof like short and just kind of opinionated, right? Just be willing tobe wrong. You just realize that sometimes you're gonna be wrong and youget back down from it and it's okay. Um you'll learn and then you'll be like,oh, okay, my bad, I was wrong, You guys are right or actually the more I talkabout this with everybody, the more I feel like I'm right and that is oftentimes the best, the best comments you get that you can then use for morecontent. Yeah. And sometimes you don't know which ones are going to actuallystrike a nerve or not. Some of my biggest pillars that I talked to mostof the time where things that I didn't know where things until I posted aboutit and people started getting angry and then I realized I agreed, I only becamemore convinced that my opinion was right and now I post about that becameone of my defining pillars, like one of mine is like volume over posting moreover less, you know, like a volume versus quality. I'm in the volume camp.Yes, I know a lot of people disagree with, you know, because you've probablywritten some of those you bragging about volume, right? Post more qualitywill follow. So that's one thing just posting things that are generallyhelpful not posting, like it's your diary. What's another thing that peopleoften get in people's way of getting engagement? Yeah. So this one I kind oftouched on already is that it's not relative or relevant, it's not relevantto your audience, so they don't have a reason to care about it. And so I thinkyou have to realize, I mean to stand strong on who you are and what you wantto talk about, but also to know like what your niche is and what yourindustry is, and to know who exactly you want to be talking to, right?Because if it's not relevant to the audience that you're trying to reach,you're really not going to have much of a reach, right? So how do you identifywhat the relevant audiences? It's a really great question. And I think alot of it is just like testing testing with your content and seeing whoresponds to it and seeing what they're saying to it, because obviously you'regoing to have some sort of an idea, like you're going to know that you'renot writing for deep sea divers or whatever, like so not writing for them,you know that you know that already, and you know that you're going to bewriting for people in the marketing industry, and so you just have tonarrow it down after that. And I think a lot of that comes from theconversations that you have with the people that you work with off of, youknow, outside of lengthen, get off the platform and then bring that back tothe platform. Yeah, So it's about identifying who you want to attract andthen figuring out what does that person care about, because it might not beabout what you care about. Shoot, It might not be about your product that'sbuilt for them. It might be other topics. So that's the second thing.First thing was don't write like it's your diary be content that's actuallyhelpful or interesting. The person you're writing for make sure you'rewriting relevant content for them. That was too. So what's number three? Numberthree is that it's that it's not extensive enough that it's just boring.I see it as a lot. It's sort of like, uh, I don't know, like a copy and pastesyndrome, like the same idea is going around and around and around or evenbasic things that people say. It's like,...

...that's marketing 101 already know that.Um You see a ton of that on linkedin and so then you just kind of have tofilter through it and scroll through it and get exhausting. But I think if youreally want to stand out, then you have to find a way to maybe break, break theinformation down more or think about it in a different way. And even a lot ofpeople on linkedin, if it's substantial enough, they'll take time to read alonger post. It doesn't have to be like a quick and snappy status if you'reactually talking about something that's going to be helpful to somebody. So Ithink make it more extensive and then, you know, or the mistake is that it'sboring, the curious to make it more extensive, but also to make it moreengaging and infuse your own personal brand into it. Yeah, you might have aunique take on something, but often I just find that information isincomplete, right? So like, let's take two examples is, uh in the bloggingworld, I use this example all the time. If you're going to write a blog abouthow to run a marathon and your first tip, your secret pro tip is drink water.It's kind of like, okay, like of course I'm gonna drink water while I'm runninga 26.2 miles. Like anything else, do you want to tell me? Like how muchwater is there something I should be mixing in the water? Like tell mesomething a little bit more. Should I carry water or should I just depend onthe cups on the side of the road? Should I take a break? Should I walkwhile I drink or should I just continue to figure out how to drink whilerunning, which is a pain in the butt, right? These are things I was lookingfor. So if I was creating a content for a few first time marathon runners likemore, I need something more than just drink water because that was kind ofobvious. But that kind of happens in Lincoln content all the time, right?Someone's offering some generic advice. Like don't be the smartest person inthe room. I'm like, what does that even mean? Does that mean the dumbest personin the company is the Ceo and on the bottom are all the smartest people inthe world? Like what? How does that work? So giving more specifics andbreaking down things that people might understand and everybody has somethingunique, Emily, you have something unique as someone who's writing moreLincoln content than anybody. I know you're literally, that's like your,most of your days are just spent coming up with unique angles for this, whichis why you've gotten good at identifying these. Can you think of anyother ways? Like, you've taken something that is like the normal thingpeople say and then, like, changes. So it's interesting a lot of that honestlydoes just come from the people that I'm writing for. I just take, I find a wayto take what they think or what they're saying and say it in a more excitingway, I suppose, because they've got the experience, my experience is writingand creating content and that's what I'm good at. But there's so many timeswhere someone will say, like, I really want to write about this and I'm like,I don't even know what that is. So then I have to then go and do research, butalso they will provide me with maybe a podcast episode that they've done. SoI'm taking what they've already said and just formatting it for length in.Um so I find that to be really helpful. I also just, I consume a ton of contentevery day. Like I put out a ton of content, but I consume a ton of content,so I'm subscribed to like a million different marketing emails, like I lovetwitter, I consume a ton of twitter because it's nice and stackable um andthen obviously like I'm on linkedin all the time, so when you're doing that,you have so much input that allows you to have unique output, if that makessense? That's funny. I hear people argue sometimes that like if yourcontent creator you shouldn't consume, you should just create. I'm like, Idon't know, sometimes I get my best ideas from consuming other people'scontent and then respond and then posting it or something. Just create asnice in theory and it's nice if I'm just creating for one thing, but I'mcreating for 13 different people and so I can't just come up with all of thatfrom within myself dry. Yeah, exactly. So what's 1/4 way that people arefailing to get engagement? Yeah. So the...

...fourth one is that they are simply notproviding a reason to engage. So there's no call to action, there's noquestion. And I think if you have content that is extensive enough, thatis relevant that people want to engage, but sometimes they're just looking for,they need a question to guide them in how to engage. Um, and so I see a lotof people make posts that are just like, all right, this is what I think that'sit and they don't ask you a question at the end. And so it's easy to keepscrolling through those ones and um, I see a lot of people say like agree ordisagree question mark or stops and I don't think that that's a bad way to doit, I think that that's inviting people in at least. Um But I also think thatif you can come up with specific questions, that's a compelling reasonfor people to leave a comment on your post. Um and that way you get morereach, but you also get more feedback to then continue to refine your content.Absolutely, and it's tricky. I've literally gone to post with theintention of engaging with the comment and then got to the end and I have noidea what to say, you're like actually I wanted to leave the comment right nowand I'm drawing a blank, I have no idea how to add to this. Usually I'm prettygood at doing is I do it a lot. If you add a question that's relevant, I don'thave to think about it so hard and then I can go and leave the comment. Ofcourse I'm a comment machine. I'm trying to do a lot of comments causethat's part of how the Lincoln game works. The more you engage in otherpeople's posts, the more your post gets seen. So the more value you add, themore linkedin gives you value to your post. Right? Exactly. Do you find thatsome questions are better than others and why? Yeah, I think the morespecific the question and the more clear the question that that's anobvious when we're clear the question. But a lot of people are like, insteadof saying, do you agree, they're like, do you not agree to disagree? Likemaking it more complicated than it has to be? Because sometimes I do, I readquestions, I'm like, I don't even know what this is asking me so to make it,and I think those are generally the ones where people are like, oh I haveto add a question to this, what should I add? But to make it just to make itclear, but also to make it specific you're looking for, you don't just wantcomments. You want people to actually have an answer to what you're askingand to have something substantial that you can engage with. So the morespecific you make the question, the more you'll get that back. Sometimes apost, even if you ask a question, the post is engaging enough that they'llstart commenting, that's not even engaging the question, I've seen thathappen a lot. And the one thing that I've found with the question that thisis kind of the trick is asking a question that's really relative to whatyou just wrote. That's really easy to respond to. Because if you ask a deepquestion being like, what's the deepest thought you ever had? People are like,uh they move on their scrolling down, you have to stop and think for likemore than two seconds about what their answer is going to be. They're probablynot going to comment. Yeah. That's actually a trap that I fall into.Because I'll see a question like that. I'm like, what is my answer to this?And then I'm like, yeah, I'm spending way too. Let's move on. All right.What's the last thing you would say keeps people from getting engagement?Yeah. So this one I would say it's just formatted poorly. So you're we mightnot know what your point is because of everything else that's in your post,whether it's just a long story or you're a very worthy person or it'slike blocked off in paragraphs. Nobody reads just paragraphs of you know, likea content. They just they prefer bullet points, We prefer something that'seasier to consume. Which is why, you know, people like the tweets thatpeople are posting on linkedin, but I would say just to make your point clear,but also to make it readable, right? So to break it up in the short sentences,I really love linkedin post because it's somewhere between a tweet and blogpost, right? You can actually have...

...instead of actually having likesections of a blog post, you're really just putting the heading. So it's theultimate little scannable snack because it's not just a thought, it's multiplethoughts. It's a whole idea package. But it kind of creates an interestingmedium between Lincoln and blood posts that is a little bit longer and you canactually learn something from it instead of just a provocative idea. Butit's not quite blog posts, like you can consume it in 30 seconds or orsomething like that. Um So what are some formatting things that you'redoing to like, differentiate our post from, like everybody else to post? Yeah.So it's really important to grab attention in the first three lines,right? It's like above the fold. That's what people are going to read andthat's going to determine if they want to click read more. So I think thatthat has to be generally I format that break it up into three sentences, butalso something that's really exciting and then you get into your main point.Um so I have been doing that. I also I love emojis. I think this is like uhthis is a 50 50 thing. Some people don't, but I actually think emojis arereally great at calling out a specific point or a sentence to draw attentionto that, so I'll do that too. Um or all caps, you know, just shout at somebodyand it's not for a whole paragraph, but maybe a word or two. I think that thosereally help you draw attention to what you want people to pay attention to.Gosh, that's so much more emotion to it are funnier. You know, if you know howto do it right? Not just replace the word with an emoji that's kind ofobvious, but if you like know how to add a little spin to it with emojisthan it goes so far are gifts or memes or stuff like that. Yes, I know we doit because we're trying to attract marketers and marketers generally likeemojis, but if I were doing it to like financial executives then I probablywouldn't use emojis unless unless that's your differentiator is likeyou're the fun finance person to talk to. So it kind of depends on whatyou're going for. Generally I'd say emojis over no emojis, but I don'tunderstand why you wouldn't, since you're in it so much. I wanted to askyou about some of the trends that you're seeing, what you're consuming, Aton of content. You're writing lots of content. What are some of the thingsthat you're seeing out there that you're thinking about our experimentingwith yourself? So lately I've been seeing a ton of polls um and I thinkpeople are just using those because you get a ton of engagement because it'seasy, right? Like the easier like you're saying with questions easier,you can make it to engage the better and so people can just click onsomething and then keep scrolling through. Um, So I'm seeing a lot ofthat and I do think that probably sometimes they're just going for easyengagement because someone will say like, you prefer pizza hot or cold andthat's really not useful to anyone make pizza, right? Yeah, you're a pizzamaker. But other than that, like if you are actually asking something as, Idon't know, as a survey or for deeper research, I think the polls are great.They're great for that and can actually really help you with learning orcreating more content. But I'm seeing a lot of those and I'm curious to see howthose continue to play out or if people will get tired of those and then peopleare tired of them because they went about it on there all the time. Anotherpool. I really, you know, whatever. Like somebody I like him personallybecause I, I'm always like suckered into like, I wonder what people votedfor this. I know what I'm going to pick, but I want to see what other peoplepicked. So it's kind of like, it's a little nugget in and of itself just tosee what the results are to ripple what I don't want to vote because I want tosee what people are saying. So sometimes I don't even want to I don'twant people to know what I voted on on some polls, so I'll vote and thenquickly on vote just because I wanted to see what the results were. Butbecause your name is attached to it every time you vote, like the creatorcan actually go and pull the list of everybody who voted on what it'savailable. Voting on the pizza pull stand like that. I mean I probably am,but I wouldn't make those, they're so...

...easy. I just touch it, you're like whynot? Okay, so I'm also seeing a lot of people treating linkedin like twitteror even like facebook, you're seeing more well and there are a few facets tothat, you're seeing more personal things, which I think that there's agood mix of personal content and um you know, educational content, there's,there's a place for both, but I've seen more personal posts and I am seeingmore um I think just as far as like treating it like twitter, I'm seeingmore short posts that are not super relevant that are just like, oh thisthing happened to me the other day and that's it. Maybe that's like facebookas well because people say all kinds of random stuff on facebook or they'll belike, oh this is what I had for breakfast, how do you feel about eggs?So I think that there's, I do not appreciate when people use linkedin asfacebook or twitter. So it brings up an interesting topic, like a lot of peoplehave started talking about like Lincoln becoming too personal. Where do youdraw the line? And do you, do you one, do you feel like personal stuff can beon linkedin at all? And if so where do you draw the line on? How much is toomuch? It's a really good question. I think that brings us into a whole othertopic of personal branding, right? And how do you build a personal brand? Andbecause people do want to see that, But what does that entail? I think that there I've seen, okay, like big lifeevents, I feel like you can go ahead and post that only because people wantto celebrate with you right, when I got married. Yeah. I started a new job, ofcourse is relevant, but like anything that was huge in your life. Yeah, I'veseen a lot of those. I think those are exciting. I feel like I probably sawmore of those over this last year because people were like, we need to bemore human, need to connect in this time. And so that's understandable. Butthen I think there are other things that are just like, this is how I'mfeeling about this and it's more of a journal, right? Like we talked aboutbefore and it's sort of like a, like an outlet for someone to process something.And so I don't think that that is the place for Lincoln like I think thatthat's more of a facebook or a personal blog or something like that. But I dolike to see the humanity in people, obviously everyone does. Um and so Ithink that I really appreciate people who are able to infuse that in theirprofessional life, who are able to make a post and its educational, but theyalso have their own flair to it. And I think that's a tricky thing to figureout is how personal is too personal. So that's a great question. And I don'treally have different people take different stances, right? Like Gary v'slike, oh, post everything, it's all about. You kind of like, yeah, but youdon't, I'm like, you don't post about your family. I mean you talk aboutparenting sometimes, but your kids and your wife aren't on there. There's awhole side of you that you never post. So people do pick and choose what theyshare. I think the smart people actually like say like, okay, I'm goingto talk about this, this, this and this, but nothing else just to show someparts of it. But you don't have to share the whole thing. Right? Wellyou're protecting your personal life that way too. Which I think isimportant. So absolutely anything else you see going on? I don't know, I meansomething you brought up the other day how people are screen shotting tweetsand putting tweets on in how I feel about that. And uh I have said beforelike I don't want lengthen to become twitter right? But it does, it doesgrab your attention. You do scroll past and you see a screenshot and it's justyou know a sentence or something like interesting and engage with it. But I'mseeing a lot more of that. And then also like if I can rabbit trail for asecond, we're testing a lot of like gifts or gifts and means. Um and thoseare those have been fun to and I think those work really well because it's agood way to mix up what you're doing. Like you just had one a couple weeksago, that was that Star wars meme with...

Anakin padme ng, like it's all over theplace and so people like, like the different take on it. So I've enjoyedlike thinking of brainstorming names and stuff like that. You're good on it.I want anakin one you did of mind like went viral. I can't remember how manypeople saw it, but it was like 70, people or something crazy like that,which I had not seen since like a pole. Like only polls usually get that farright now. So it's fun to see other content other than polls get drasticreach man. So this has been a fun conversation. I can't wait to like sendthis to people if they ask me like what's working on linkedin, I'm justgonna send them this interview over and over again. I think we covered a ton ofdifferent materials around what's, what's working, what's not working,things that are trending right now Emily's or anything else that you thinkour audience would need to know in order to succeed on linkedin before weend this episode. Yeah, so I just want to end with a lot of the conversationsthat I've had with the people that I'm writing for, initially when we jump ona kickoff call is like there's no, there's either a lack of capacity or alack of confidence. And so capacity is one that just takes discipline of likejust sit down and time block for an hour on friday and just write a bunchof content that you can post throughout the week. And I think that that's areally great way to take it on. But I also think the lack of confidence side,um if you have, if you have buying from your company and they want to helptheir evangelists or their ambassadors or whatever create more content, then Ithink another important part of that is not only equipping them and enablingthem and empowering them to create content. Like we've done by yourtraining videos and bringing me on board. Like I think they also just needto feel like they can do that like there, they might not be writers, butthey need to feel that they can't right, they do have something to say. And so Ithink that if you want a successful evangelist program, you have to be ableto create resources and training for them too. I feel like they can do that.That makes sense, totally. Makes sense. So Emily, this has been fantastic. Ifpeople want to learn more and connect with the the again, the wizard behindthe curtain who's doing a lot of Arlington work, where can they find you?Yeah, they can find me on Lincoln. My name is Emily de Brito, D I B R I T Oand that would be my main one. So find me there. Let's connect. You heard thateverybody go and find Emily de Brito on linkedin and connect with her. She'sdoing her own content on top of writing, everybody's else because she's part ofher own program. So again, hopefully this has been helpful to you. If it hasbeen one, go and follow Emily, but certainly go and drop a five star orwhatever start you feel like it's worth um on apple podcasts or Spotify orwherever you're listening to this episode. It blesses us a ton. If youjust go and give us a rating, you don't even have to leave a review. If you do,I will read it. It's fantastic. But thank you so much for joining us onthis episode of GDP Growth. Mhm Gary V says it all the time and weagree every company should think of themselves as a media company first,then whatever it is they actually do if you know this is true, but your team isalready maxed out and you can't produce any more content in house. We can help,we produce podcasts for some of the most innovative baby brands in theworld and we also help them turn the content from the podcast into blogposts, micro videos and slide decks that work really well on linkedin. Ifyou want to learn more, go to Sweet Fish Media dot com slash launch oremail Logan at sweet Fish Media dot com.

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