What Not To Do In 2022, with Ruslan Tovbulatov

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Benji Block interviews Ruslan Tovbulatov, VP, Global Marketing at Gloat.

This is the anti-resolution episode. A discussion on things we want to stop doing this year. We're discussing the importance of prioritization, intentionally seeing the talent already on your team, and how vital rest is to our long-term success.

Welcome into another episode of B two B growth. My name is Benji Block B two B growth host here at Sweet Fish Media today. I'm joined by a new friend Ruslan, Welcome in your the VP of global marketing at glow. That is quite the title but glad to be here and get to chat with you today man. Thank you for having me. Benji. Absolutely. So 2022 is here and I'm excited for this episode man, because I don't know about you, but when Covid hit, I feel like I blinked and two years passed, like time is just flying by, but we're going to have fun and because it's the beginning of a new year, we thought we would sort of do what like an anti resolution episode. Yeah, I think everyone is talking about the resolutions they want to make for the new year and everyone is thinking about what to do. So I've been reflecting a lot on what I don't want to do, what not to do in 2022. And so yeah, it's a bit of an anti resolution list that we've been compiling and I think these things are so timely to us and because it's so easy to hear in all of the noise like do this, you should try this diet, you should try this in your marketing and your business. Like I mean that is everywhere. We're hoping that we give you some solace over the next few minutes to go here's, here's five things I want to strategically not do right. Like here's five things That will really, hopefully just be helpful tips and things to be reminded of throughout the next 12 months and throughout the next year and I think it's gonna make us highly more effective in our marketing and in our work. So give me a little bit of your background real quick man, just so people have some flavor for you and kind of what you do day in and day out before we jump into this list. Yeah, absolutely. So the quick background is, you know, I've been marketing for a long part of my career. The name is Ruslan Khasbulatov by the way. It's very Russian, if you're guessing I was born in Moscow, Russia. So I live in the US now, you're based in Manhattan new york, but very tied to my roots in Russia family there and I started my career actually on, you know, I moved to the States um that we might get into some of those things where you know, I have a very multicultural background, it kind of informs a lot of my marketing approach and I think about things. But I started my career here and marketing consulting at a company called kantar retail, doing large scale consumer research, learned a ton there around the consumer mentality and mindset, decision making, pricing, packaging, all those things. It was a google and Youtube for a very long time could we could do a whole episode on that. It was an amazing experience, but was there and at a time when a lot of brands were moving into digital and mobile and Youtube was becoming a thing. So we're helping a lot of the largest brands adapt their and then joined uh thrive Global, which is the health and well being company run by Arianna Huffington um and was ended up being CMO their chief marketing officer after doing product and partnerships work as well. I was employee 15 grew that business like crazy and then most recently joined the company called Gloat, which is in the kind of talent space and I'm sure we'll talk a little bit more about that, but I'm running the VP of marketing there, so running the operations from, you know, demand to brand too, product marketing and a few things in between. So I think a lot about, you know, managing a team, growing a team scaling it and yes, we think about, you know, the year ahead as we're planning the year, thinking about definitely what we need to do as a business, but also some of the things we might want to leave behind, which I think brings us to this conversation for sure. That's a fun winding journey that it's gonna be fun to just kind of tap into some of that today with you. Well, let's jump in here. So we have a list of five things, right, five things that we're going to resolve not to do and I'll just throw it back to you, give us the first one what's something that you're saying? I don't want to do this this next year, right? Yes. One is, don't confuse urgent with important. I think a lot of people hear about this, I'll give you kind of my perspective on why it's so important. You know, people talk about and and hopefully a lot of people think about, you know that I have seen the Eisenhower Matrix, if you haven't, you should definitely google it. It's this idea that I think a lot of times in our lives, especially in...

...our work, you know, we'll get a slack, will get an email and we almost assigned something to get done today or this week and we kind of naturally assign importance with urgency. Like just because something is said to get done today, we almost automatically assume that it is important. I think I've been really catching myself, especially in covid era thinking like what is actually really important in a moment and what is just seemingly urgent and that's why, you know, it's very important. Always as you get a request, one of the things that the rules I apply is slack and email are really good for telling you what's urgent. They're usually bad at telling you what's important, but your calendar and of course you're okay rs and goal setting that you should be doing, but especially your calendar on a weekly basis should be telling you what's important, Not always good to telling you what's urgent, but you need to find that balance between the two and so one of the things I always do is, how do we look at our calendar because you're making those decisions of like, when do I have to meet with certain people? How do you prioritize those things? How much time do you set aside for working blocks? Hopefully you're doing that. But those are the decisions you've already made of where your time should be spent in the rank order. But a lot of times we get distractions and we say, oh, maybe something's origin. So how do we actually make sure we're always aware and think about that Eisenhower Matrix. We don't have time to go through it. I can talk for an hour about it, but how do you always know and ask yourself, is this truly important and urgent or just urgent? Yeah. Actually, so last month on B two B growth, we did a throwback series and we referenced believe it was kevin Cruz, but he talks about, he interviewed all of these like billionaires and he compiled like time management tips, right? And the most important takeaway from that whole episode for me and bringing it back really was the idea of time blocking, which I think is something that's talked a lot about in in marketing or highly like efficient successful people. I heard that so much, right? But we go through seasons where like we're really busy or we're really not and to have that consistency to actually work us towards like, okay, I'm putting this on my calendar, I'm putting this in my schedule and I'm doing that consistently. It will help you really determine what's most important right now. So I love this one because I raised my hand as so guilty of the slack hits, the email hits and all of a sudden I'm just, I'm just distracted. Do you find that personally for you? You're kind of that personality type? Yeah, no, absolutely. And I'm guilty of it too. You know, I'm the first to be guilty to like say I have an idea or there's something came in or we heard, you know, from being the Ceo or someone, we have an idea. You know, it's like part of the management is definitely deciding what to pass along. But I'm the type, if I get excited about something, I, it's very hard for me to hide it. I think one of those two things I actually do myself that I try to empower my team to do. I think the first one you mentioned by the way the calendar ring is very powerful, there's two others, One is, um, the idea of big rocks is very important and I try to instill that in our team, it's very hard to do. But Stephen Covey did this like ages ago and there's a funny video because it seems so old, but it's still so relevant. It's this idea that you try to fill a jar and you start with the pebbles and sand, you won't leave room for the actual big rocks, but if you start with the big rocks, um you will owe the sand and pebbles will fill in and around it. And so the same container can hold much more if you start with the big rocks. And that is actually I try to instill that like what are the three things you're gonna do this week that are absolute priority. It's so natural for people to start listing four and five and six and seven. But on my team, how I managed and how I tried, it's like, what are the real top three? Yes, you can list other things if you really need to. But I just want to hear about those big three because those are the needle movers and then ruthlessly prioritizing. We literally used to do this in my previous organization to, it's like how do you ruthlessly prioritize? And it's an amazing action to take. If someone gives you something to do and says, this is urgent, go back to that person and actually have an honest conversation saying, hey, I have these other three things that I was really prioritizing help me rank, order this, Help me put this in stack rank this.

It's so funny, A lot of people don't take that step, but it's a really human natural thing to just go back and ask like, hey, I have these other priorities and it doesn't have to be neither condescending nor aggressive. It could just be like, hey, I kind of need your advice. Like where do you think this stack ranks helped me understand the importance. I know the urgency help me understand the importance. So those are some things that I'm introducing. Yeah, the over communication of where something is on the priority list is so helpful for the team. But it also shows that if you know to your boss or whoever, like it shows that you're taking responsibility right? Like that. You're really thinking through the process, you're really owning it and going, okay, what's most important to our business right now? What's most important to our department right now? So that's really ruthless priority. I love how you said that. I think that's a really good way of thinking about it. Let me ask you this, you say that you talk about the top three every week, what does that look like and how does that compare to maybe your quarterly goals or longer term goals. I think that's a great segue into actually number two for me because I think what we just talked about is very effective on a daily weekly basis. I think the second rule, I called it in my kind of list is I'm thinking about the year, Don't sweat the small stuff or don't get distracted by the small stuff, but really what that is, is like think about the big bets like what are the actual needle movers over the course of a quarter, half a year, maybe even more because I think the top three, you know, it is a really good thing for weekly, but I think it realistically when you're sending okay are so you're sending kind objectives of the quarter, you need to think a longer time horizon and there's gonna be more things to do than just three. I think a lot of companies actually forget to set those like make those big bets. Um and I've been through that, especially when you're smaller, I don't know, people listening in there and you know, either seed stage or series A series B it's very easy to not have an okay our process. But I'll tell you like as a manager, even for yourself, just setting at the beginning of a quarter the goals that you hope to achieve, even if they're complete assumptions, it's so incredibly powerful because when you're on the grind of building a business and by the way, this was true google to when we have tens of thousands of people but okay, ours are so well established in organizations like that. It's almost harder when you're smaller. I think you have to because you'll see time goes by and all of a sudden three months ago, a quarter goes by and you almost don't remember how much you achieved, but if you look back at the original list, you can have made a lot of progress. The question then becomes how do you set those priorities? That's the hard part. And just one of the things I'll just share on that and the pauses somewhere in the business, even if you don't have metrics, there are goals that exist because even if you're at seed stage, there's someone either the Ceo or the head of finance, like goals are being set and communicated whether it's to a board or investors etcetera, goals exist. So it's a matter of figuring out starting with the business, what are the business goals? What is the board expecting investors expecting those things exist if you're in a private company in public? You know, a lot of the stuff is public and then the second piece is think about like what is the rest of the organization doing? You know, ask around like is your product team, do they have a bunch of releases happening that you can support if you're in marketing, but it can also be any other CS like wherever you are in the organization and then only then do you set your own kind of make up your own goals? So for me that's a big part of it is definitely think about, okay. RS in the quarter and then think about what are other teams in the organization? What is the business expecting? So that your, your priorities almost fall into that. Mm I love that. And I totally agree. The earlier the better. So let me give you a story. Last company I worked for introduced okay Rs But we were already scaling and growing quite a bit right. So then the headache that it is to try to implement and share the vision of an okay our system when you're already moving so fast, like you can do it right if you're listening to this and you aren't there yet. Like I don't, I don't want to discourage you. I want to encourage you into it. But I will say like the earlier on the better because you set that culture early and it's like we already have the format, we already know where to reference all this stuff. It's already built in versus like ah man, well now we have all these people that were trying to...

...like align and you know, so just lead from the top and start that now or lead from wherever you are in the organization and and read up on it. There's so many videos on Youtube that can help you with Okay. Rs to like, but I just think the earlier the better for that because it's such a headache once you have a lot of people involved. I think that reframe is so important to like it's, it's really can't, it won't work if it feels like, oh it's a chore. We have to do an upper management decided and the ceo said we're going to do with the power of it. Why I'm realizing how important it is and how now I want every single person that very clearly defined objectives and key results is. You see how powerful as it is as a motivator. Like when you launch a campaign we had this campaign we were launching, we said at the outset, you know, last year we did this campaign similar and we had about 1500 leads come in. RM Q. LS. And we said, what if we doubled it? What if we got to 3000? And then you had people like you had the project manager on the team almost accounting everyone else, even senior management, even the ceo being like, we need to get to 3000. Like we're clearing the calendar, going back to ruthless prioritization. The reason we knew like this campaign, we had a goal and everyone on the team became obsessed more than I did. I wanted 3000. Sure. And compensated on that in a way, you know, like that's my goal. But it became everyone's goal. And so when you set those objectives, even if they're crazy or unachievable, honestly, like it's still rallies someone and it it really inspires them to to all focused on one thing and it can be very powerful. So okay, so don't get distracted by the small stuff that's our our second on the list. One of the things here that to be thinking about is like big creative campaigns across channels, right? Like so for marketing, like where are we going to create buzz and and kind of move the needle. Talk to me a little bit about how you think about that. So it's not just the small stuff, but it's like this is really what we're focused on. Yeah, it's such a good point. I'll give again, we can talk a lot more about this. But I think the quick insight is even as a leader, you know, it says marketers, a lot of us are probably perfectionist and I'm definitely guilty of this where like I want to edit, you know, the one piece of content we have or even the social post. But actually what I've been really realizing, especially as you think about, you know, when I do 2022 planning actually looking at targets for 2023 and that's just like, especially at my place in the organization, if you're a VP or ahead of let alone into your sea level, you know, you're thinking years ahead. And so this idea that you can't, you really can't be sweating the small stuff and what I really recommend people do. And I've been doing this is like, it's also not about the marketing to just invent things, right? It really is kind of going back to what I was saying, like let's look at what is the board expecting? What is the business set to do and then asked a series of questions like what is marketing's role in it? Okay let's say you have to close 100 deals. You've said you're gonna close 100 deals in Q. One. Okay. What is marketing's role or the expectations of marketing? How many of those are gonna be marketing source or marketing originated? How many of those are gonna be marketing influence? Maybe it's 100 align on those expectations and then say okay how do we get there? Some of them might come from product releases and that's the idea is that cross sell Upsell is it um you know those new deals or they are we doing the legacy products or some of the new products or their new segments we're going into. There's all these questions to ask is you're setting those big priorities and that's why I think about you can either get caught in the linkedin posts or the twitter, the tweet or the or the instagram post or really have like this strategic view and whatever you are in the organization. I think starting from the top down and thinking about like how do I contribute even in the smallest way to the biggest metric? I think that's important and then marketing really to me has to fill in the gaps. You either supporting some of those things like product launches. Okay how do we activate product, its product, marketing is probably demand, it's probably content. Like all of us need to come together to launch a new product or a new segment, but then there are other things were like, hey, we don't have a product launch. Maybe we have a lull for six months and that's where you introduce events.

That's when you introduce campaigns, Maybe you want to kind of come up with something new and creative that you haven't done before. And that's why I think then that your own big bets kind of come in in that way. So that's how I think about it. There's probably a lot of different frameworks for it that we can discuss too. But that's at the high level how I think about it. There's so much to think about their, the one thing that you said that you're really sticking out to me is like right questions, right results. Because if we have the wrong questions or we don't ask enough questions and we're just trying to, you know, I wouldn't say we're trying to just get by right. But if you ask the right question to the right person, it can really help give you that like, okay, this is the big thing that we need to be focused on and like you said, when you're really high up and you're thinking further out, those conversations are vital and making sure that you're, you are asking the strategic question. It's like such a big deal. All right. So we have first one. Don't confuse urgent with important second don't get distracted by the small stuff. Here's the third one. Don't copy and paste expand on that a little bit for me. What does that all entail? Yeah, I think this one, you know, it could have been true. I think even as we were entering Covid, I think a lot of people realize that some of the old ways we're no longer going to apply. But I think it's it's been interesting because I have heard this, you know, as we we we work in the talent space, work with HR leaders. I think there's a sense that there's going to be a return to normalcy and that we can kind of go back to the way things were. I think a lot of people have realized it's probably not realistic. But I actually realized like this is such an opportunity, especially for our team to kind of re imagine everything where I think this ongoing uncertainty is going to exist? Like they were kind of continue being hybrid. We're going to continue being, you know, remote and we I'm managing a global team, I almost can't predict where I'm going to hire my next marketer. You know, it's kind of wherever the talent is will go and we don't know where the market's going ahead. And also like the speed with which competitors are introduced. You know, it's so easy to start a business, there's so much funding. There's like there's so much uncertainty. So for me, I'm like really big right now. I'm taking the playbook from the past year and saying, how do we kind of rip it apart? Like what if we? Re envisioned everything? And to us, this might be a crazy thing, but I'll tell you like it's just, I feel so empowered when I decided to do this, we're actually looking at all of our historical metrics and like our historical team structure and I'm just revisiting all of it. And so as we enter the new year. Um, and these are not easy things, right? Because people, like some kind of sense of, you know, like this is the way things were. But yeah, exactly. Yeah. But this idea of like where does the content sit and what are the objectives of content? Right. This idea of like how does actually content play in sales acceleration and how do they actually almost become unified partners with the BDR SDR team and not just like, you know, a lot of companies will think about content as the blog, um, or the linkedin channel or their tweets or whatever, but it's so much bigger than that. It actually is an incredibly powerful tool that I really believe sits across the whole stack all the way to the sail all the way to renew ALs. And so that changes the way you might structure a team and changes the, okay, our escape as it might change even discussions you have internally to say, hey, maybe the board shouldn't just be hearing about M. Qs. And leads anymore from the marketing team. What about renewal's? What about how we accelerate sales cycles And there's a lot of these conversations that need to happen. Please go ahead. Okay. Wait. Because I want to hear you expand on the renewal's portion. Like when you're re imagining this, thinking about it, how do you see content and that kind of like fused together or what's the connection you started to draw? There's two things I've been thinking a lot about one and this is a perfect example. Maybe this is kind of no brainer, but customer marketing is, is a very important role. I think that a lot of organizations don't hire for early and I didn't actually in the past year and a half or so ago. But it's very important because you think about how are we actually maintaining the relationships? Of course you have an amazing customer success team, but that's the reality is, you know, there are a lot of times in the weeds, they're like making sure the product is...

...working really well. They're looking at kind of the day to day, week to week operations. Are they seeing growth? But they're not necessarily always kind of creating the love within the organization saying, hey, do you need advice from another customer? Do you want to get invited to a customer community event? Do you want to give us feedback on the future product roadmap and these are all basics, I think when you're in large organizations like a google, they're just happening somewhere. But establishing that function early and really thinking about, okay, how does customer marketing play in? But then what is the role of content and community? And that's a really important question A lot of companies aren't thinking about, I definitely wasn't until more recently because companies might love you, but they might need advice and okay, well we just finished stage one, we finished the pilot. We're about to scale everyone else or hey, we want to expand to our frontline workers. It's a perfect example and this is a lot of technologies people are selling probably we oftentimes optimized for the desk worker, you know, slack et cetera. If you think about all these technologies, we talk about every day that we are using right now, zoom et cetera there for a certain part of the population. But we're about, we actually have an offering for frontline. No one has really solved that in the whole industry. So this idea that you know that we can just, anyone can come and answer that for them is impossible. It's actually going to be about community, about learning from each other and then about generating content and that inspires the next company or the next batch to actually say, oh, you know, this is how this can be done now. That is all renewal and Upsell by the way because these are existing customers. But I think the way we actually leverage marketing to connect the right people to create community to create content from the learnings. Those are all the things that I'm thinking about. How do we actually automate and scale that there's a lot of learning to be done. But once we establish the process, I really want to scale that. Hey everybody Olivia here as a member of the sweet fish sales team, I wanted to take a second and share something that makes us insanely more efficient. Our team uses lead I. Q. So for those of you who are in sales or sales ops, let me give you some context. You know how long gathering contact data can take so long and with lead I. Q. What once took us four hours to do now it takes us just one that is 75% more efficient. We are so much quicker with outbound prospecting and organizing our campaigns is so much easier than before. I suggest you guys check it out as well. You can find them at least I Q dot com. That's L E A D I Q dot com. Alrighty. Let's jump back into the show. Some people need to rewind the last two minutes and re listen to that because I think that thought process, some of the questions that you're pondering, you don't have to give an answer. I think this is something I'm learning in podcasting a lot right now is when we just focus on what is a strategic question, what's something like you kind of brought it up? Okay. This is the historical way we've done it. I want to just imagine what it'd be like. I'm not even saying we have to blow it up. I'm not even saying we have to change it. But when's the last time that we said this isn't just like concrete the way we're for sure doing it over the next 12 months. And when you start to think about customer marketing, you're right. A lot of big companies get it really well right because they got the budget to hire somebody to think that way. Whereas a lot of smaller companies are going, alright, well we just have to, you know, we just have to get more customers. Like that's, that's the only thought process. But I'll give you another story. Another example, Spotify. I know they're a huge example but a way that they've done this really well to get hyper individual. I'm an early adopter and they sent me a message. I can't even tell you how long ago this was man, this was probably several years ago, I had forgotten about it. They have a product team that was developing a new product and it was going to basically be like think of a almost like a tablet for your car and it's gonna be, if you don't have a Tesla, if you don't have like a newer...

...model car that has some epic big screen in it already. Go ahead. If you sign up for this, we'll send you one for free. So you're not on your phone while you're driving. Here's a, here's a screen, right? So they're thinking about the customers that are already on. If you're already a customer, you're eligible, just give us your email, like sign up this little form, give us a little bit more detail on whatever They messaged me like two weeks ago and like they're still developing it. They're like, hey, it's, it's ready for you. So like, and it's again, it's just like they didn't have to do that right. They could have made it only available to new customers. But it's this ongoing thought process of like how can we up our customer marketing, what other value can we add to them that it's really impressed me and that's a big example. But there's, there's definitely other ones for sure. So I love this and that's a perfect example of like that's where you need to believe in not copying and pasting to enable an idea like that and that's why that's like such a big part of that because the customer marketing piece is just one of them. You know, it's like, how do we actually think about the next year and actually try entirely new things, it might, it might mean as another example for us, it's, you know, I think a lot of times people talk about this like no lead for movement and like really focusing and doubling down on a B M, but I'm like, it's a tough transition and we're just going to do it and basically told the team is like, we're going to rip the Band Aid, I'm gonna start stop looking at our enterprise funnel as a funnel entirely. I almost am starting these conversations and basically need alignment all the way up to the board is like, I actually don't want it to be about mpls and leads for a large part of our book of business because we have a target account list, we know the named accounts. How do we actually create a super high touch initiatives that allow us to actually grow those businesses from? And that's the inverted pyramid, you know, there are a lot of models, but the, it's so hard to make that pivot, like everyone talks about it on podcasts and I've been talking about it for a long time to how do we do it? But we're doing it this year because I basically said, I refuse to copy and paste, I'm almost throwing away the old benchmarks that we have and we're just going to create a new model and we're gonna try it, we're gonna try for Q one Q two, we're not gonna rip it completely, you know, we're gonna still make sure we're creating a funnel, so we don't kill the business, but I'm gonna invest heavily into like what if we just inverted it and actually did a large part of investment, focusing on the accounts first and growing it from the bottom up. So those are the things like you need to basically be comfortable with not just copying and pasting and trying new things that is, we could spend so much time there. I love that. And uh okay, let's keep things moving, So don't copy and paste brings us to number four. What do you got for this one? Yeah, so it's slightly different, but I think to enable everything we just talked about, especially some of the creative ideas. One of the things is hiring, you know, it's a huge challenge for us right now. How do we get the right people? And what I learned, especially over the past year, because we're in the space where the talent hiring space, but you talk to other marketers, it's really hard to hire out there. It's hard to retain talent. You know, the great resignation of great, we call it the reassessment, it's real. And so the one thing that's really important is don't overlook the talent you have right? I think a lot of times we start looking, we get this, this um we get obsessed with this idea, like, oh, I need a new role, so I'm gonna go external. I'm gonna post it on linkedin? Like if you think about it, I'm gonna hire someone where do you go? You see your first thought is probably linked job board. Almost none of us say like, well let me think about the people that already have at the company and even if a tiny companies by the way. And so I'll share one example from from us. You know, we're reporting on our event are big yearly event called Gloat Live and it's a really big deal for the company. It's like and of course as big as marketing makes it, but we wanted to make it a really big deal. And I actually did not hire an events and field marketer in that time. So I didn't have anyone to own the globe line. And so instead of saying like, oh I have to hire someone or bring on an agency or look externally, I said what if we just created a team from within? And so yes, I had a couple of people from marketing and I had some designers from marketing help. But then we pulled in designers...

...from the product team, we pulled in customer success manager who's supporting. We pulled in someone from the product that there is someone, we have a product designer. We also had a product manager, we got almost every executive involved in different ways and not just to present, but to really think about like how to activate. We had office managers involved to make it a really powerful in person experience. So we literally had this massive working team almost created a team and events team, just using talent from within. And we've seen that for part time projects like that, it's an incredibly powerful thing. I think we often overlook the power of just assembling a team and swarming into something, but it's also for hiring people. One of my like the most amazing talents in the organization right now was an account manager who actually rose basically raised her hand and said, hey, I'm kind of interested in marketing and we gave her an opportunity as an account, as a marketing manager and as a marketing coordinator really to start and now she's actually leading incredible initiatives, leading some of my biggest kind of campaigns and also it's like a special ops person, but it was all because we gave a chance to someone from within that's not always possible. Sometimes you have to go and like you need the right experience, you need the right, you know, skill set. But there's amazing talent within your four walls. And so rule number four don't for 2022 for me and then everyone else out there don't overlook the talent you have. So let me ask a couple of follow up questions here because I think this is one that I would definitely be behind, but I also can hear a couple of questions just rattling around in some people's minds, one being great, you were able to assemble this team, right? But how do you know if you're not like this is just too much work on their plate? I think that's an instant reason why people would go out before hiring within or, or forming that special team to swarm. It's okay, well we're already kind of all hands on deck pretty full. So how did you assess that? To know we can pull this off and then I'll have one more question, but answer that one first, for sure. I love that. That actually goes back to the globe is appropriate to just say what we do because it's like something that question I actually think about on a day to day basis, we basically created something called the talent marketplace, which is allows people on one side, we understand the skills within an organization and dynamically match them to kind of work and jobs to be done. And that could be full time roles but can also be projects etcetera. What you're talking about is actually the number one objection we always faces, like when we sell our product and it's actually an amazing reality, what ends up happening. And we, so we work with like Unilever Mastercard, you know, hsBC, massive companies nestle like you name them. And what happens is that people actually get more engaged in their day to day job because they are actually contributing in something bigger than their day to day job and then we hear this time and time again and it's obviously really hard to quantify, but they, we actually have so Unilever always measures how many hours of productivity were unlocked and this is purely for projects, not full time roles, not jobs, which is they basically in a couple of years of working with us have had 650,000 hours unlocked and their retention and we're always measuring also impact on retention and all that. And so people, it's, it's this weird thing where we're in a reality where people are burnt out, they're tired. But a lot of that if you really dissect is I think people, it's, they, they feel like their work is kind of meaningless or they're not working on things that matter to them. And so what this kind of project, like everyone that worked on global live was exhausted at the end for sure. But if I asked all of them like how engaged they were, how passionate they were about glowed, how excited they were. I almost guarantee you, we, we didn't do this survey, I kind of tempted. Now, I almost guarantee you every single one of those people feels more of like a loyalty and engagement to gloat because we were part of something really special and meaningful that everyone at the company was, you know, I'm kind of noticing in a part of so I guess that's kind of my perspective on that question is a really important one though, I think you hit on something that actually brings us back to when you were talking about customers in that sense of community. So it can happen with employees and it can happen externally, right? Where it's like, you connect people back to community, you connect people something bigger than...

...themselves. Like, whoa, they thought of me, it's it's the same external as it is internal to just go that Yeah, it's gonna build brand loyalty, but I almost don't even like calling it that it's just like this, it's essentially it's just human connection and it deepens, oh, they see my value in a department that's not normally mine in a seat, that's not normally like I'm not normally invited to, so there's a lot there, let's let's round it out here. And the fifth one is this, don't forget to recharge, why is this one? Uh something that's really important to you personally? I think as a manager, as a leader, it's, you have to really be thinking about this going into the next year. I mean it's been a really tough two years and you know, I'm based in new york right now, you know that even the past few weeks, it's like never ending, kind of the uncertainty and so just really acknowledging that everyone's been working really hard, all the things I just talked about right there. They're hard, they're not easy things, they're exhausting too ruthlessly prioritize, right? And to focus on big things, right? Like to not sweat. The small stuff takes energy to like not confuse urgent with important takes energy to try something new. So you don't copy and paste. These are not easy things. I think that we have an amazing opportunity to focus on those and do all those in the new year, but all of that can be really exhausting and I think there's, you know, we're working hybrid were glued to screens, there's all this data around obviously that and the toll that's taking on us. I think the longer we stay here, kind of the human connection piece gets harder. Um I think really prioritizing as a leader, both taking time yourself, but as an individual to first and foremost, just realize that you are better off for yourself. And even for the company, like if your company person, you know, if you want to like a career oriented person, it's actually better for your career if you take moments to recharge and there's this amazing cartoon, I don't know if there's a way for you to maybe share with the audience later, but listen, molly always have these great cartoons. But there's this, there's this visual basically of like a straight line work work, work, work work, work work and then you get sick and it's a cliff and that's the reality, right? Most people think like, oh, I like the idea of I'll sleep when I'm dead, I'll rest. You know, whenever, like the rest is for the weak like that permeates the society even now, which is crazy to me. But people don't realize that the real way to do it and then the alternate right next to that of the peak and then the fall is just a step ladder. It's like work, recharge, work, recharge, work recharge. And then what happens is at the end of the line one person is still like on the up and up and the other one is exhausted and kind of ready to quit or give up or maybe even worse. So for me that's a really important one is as an individual, recognize the recharging is a sign of strength. It's really important. It will make you better at your work. Um and also more pleasant person. It will make you more creative, innovative. There's tons of science around that. We won't get into that. But then second as a leader and this is really important is really role modeling it and celebrating it because a lot of times we might say that, but we don't actually celebrate it. So there's little things I'm trying to do. Like I'm taking off in two weeks in the very near future and I've been very clear with my team, you can't reach me, you can't slack me, you can email me, I will be off the grid just no, no negotiation. If there's a super emergency you can call me but I am not checking and then when I come back, I want people to show I'm gonna show off my pictures. I want people to show off pictures of how they relax even if it was a staycation. But I want to actually create an environment where that celebrated and I think a lot of us can actually do more of that. I love that. I think sharing when we come back is also a, it's a fun part of like how you would build that culture that we don't think about. Like you might celebrate on the front end like oh yeah, go take time off. That's pretty, I would say that's getting them a little bit more common. But like when you come back, how you respond, who asks you about it, you know, you might have had a great time and if it's reinforced in the culture there, it's just another way to make it a deeper, more impactful kind of oh we celebrate rest in a, in a...

...unique way in our organization, in our company. So I love that man, this is a great list. I'm gonna recap us real quick. But before I read the five, I will say I'm taking away ruthless priority as a new phrase. That was all the way back from number one. But I just, I think that that is A way to think about things. If you're naturally just a busy body or you have a lot on your plate which I know if you're listening to this, you probably do. So thanks for making time to listen. Right? But ruthless priority is is a phrase that I think would really be helpful over the next 12 months and just into the future. So okay, here's our here's our list. We got five. We don't confuse urgent with important, we don't get distracted by the small stuff, we don't copy and paste, we don't overlook the talent we have and we don't forget to recharge an excellent list of five things, sort of our anti resolutions. Anything you would add before we wrap this episode. No, I just hope everyone stays healthy and happy and where whether you're listening in the new year wherever and whenever you're listening, I think it's uh it's gonna be an exciting year. There's a lot of opportunities in the marketing space, it's an ever changing landscape. Some things are going to be exciting, some things are challenging, but I think I always seeing it from the reframe of an opportunity and you stick to that last point, don't forget to recharge and role model and I think we can do a lot of great things that push the marketing industry forward. So thanks to everyone that anyone that listened for sure how can people stay connected to the work? You're doing plug gloat a little bit. Just give us ways that we can stay connected. Yeah, absolutely. So linkedin, definitely the place where I spent most of my time, just look up Ruslan, T R U S L A N T. Hopefully you find me that way. And yes, I'm VP marketing and gloat. Um yeah, we're doing some amazing work if you know, especially large organizations is kind of our sweet spot right now. We're working with some of the largest brands to really help them unlock the talent within those organizations, understand the skills and capabilities that exist today, where they need to build up skills and capabilities moving forward and then helping them dynamically match that, you know, jobs and work to be done. So whether you're launching an ice cream brands somewhere, I'm just assembling a team to do an event or hiring from within or finding mentors, etcetera. So, um, yeah, if anyone is in the market for a talent marketplace absolutely reach out to me. But if anyone wants to chat marketing or exchange ideas, linkedin is definitely best. Great. And we'll make sure we link to your linkedin in the show notes too. So people can, can jump over and, and also to gloat as well. Thanks for listening to B two B growth today, you can connect with me as well on linkedin. You just search Benji block and would love to talk about marketing business life over there. And then if you haven't subscribed to be, to be growth yet do so Wherever You're listening to this podcast is helpful to us and then you never miss an episode. So thanks for listening. Keep doing work. That matters in 2022. It's gonna be a fantastic thank you so much. Benji. Thank you everyone. Mhm. Is the decision maker for your product or service a bdb marketer. Are you looking to reach those buyers through the medium of podcasting? Consider becoming a co host of GDP Growth. This show is consistently ranked as a top 100 podcast in the marketing category of apple podcasts and the show gets more than 100 and 30,000 downloads each month. We've already done the work of building the audience so you can focus on delivering incredible content to our listeners. If you're interested, email Logan at sweet fish Media dot com.

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