What Not To Do In 2022, with Ruslan Tovbulatov

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Benji Block interviews Ruslan Tovbulatov, VP, Global Marketing at Gloat.

This is the anti-resolution episode. A discussion on things we want to stop doing this year. We're discussing the importance of prioritization, intentionally seeing the talent already on your team, and how vital rest is to our long-term success.

Welcome into another episode of B two Bgrowth. My name is Benji Block B two B growth host here at Sweet Fish Mediatoday. I'm joined by a new friend Ruslan, Welcome in your the VP ofglobal marketing at glow. That is quite the title but glad to be here and getto chat with you today man. Thank you for having me. Benji. Absolutely. So2022 is here and I'm excited for this episode man, because I don't know aboutyou, but when Covid hit, I feel like I blinked and two years passed, like timeis just flying by, but we're going to have fun and because it's the beginningof a new year, we thought we would sort of do what like an anti resolutionepisode. Yeah, I think everyone is talking about the resolutions they wantto make for the new year and everyone is thinking about what to do. So I'vebeen reflecting a lot on what I don't want to do, what not to do in 2022. Andso yeah, it's a bit of an anti resolution list that we've beencompiling and I think these things are so timely to us and because it's soeasy to hear in all of the noise like do this, you should try this diet, youshould try this in your marketing and your business. Like I mean that iseverywhere. We're hoping that we give you some solace over the next fewminutes to go here's, here's five things I want to strategically not doright. Like here's five things That will really, hopefully just be helpfultips and things to be reminded of throughout the next 12 months andthroughout the next year and I think it's gonna make us highly moreeffective in our marketing and in our work. So give me a little bit of yourbackground real quick man, just so people have some flavor for you andkind of what you do day in and day out before we jump into this list. Yeah,absolutely. So the quick background is, you know, I've been marketing for along part of my career. The name is Ruslan Khasbulatov by the way. It'svery Russian, if you're guessing I was born in Moscow, Russia. So I live inthe US now, you're based in Manhattan new york, but very tied to my roots inRussia family there and I started my career actually on, you know, I movedto the States um that we might get into some of those things where you know, Ihave a very multicultural background, it kind of informs a lot of mymarketing approach and I think about things. But I started my career hereand marketing consulting at a company called kantar retail, doing large scaleconsumer research, learned a ton there around the consumer mentality andmindset, decision making, pricing, packaging, all those things. It was agoogle and Youtube for a very long time could we could do a whole episode onthat. It was an amazing experience, but was there and at a time when a lot ofbrands were moving into digital and mobile and Youtube was becoming a thing.So we're helping a lot of the largest brands adapt their and then joined uhthrive Global, which is the health and well being company run by AriannaHuffington um and was ended up being CMO their chief marketing officer afterdoing product and partnerships work as well. I was employee 15 grew thatbusiness like crazy and then most recently joined the company calledGloat, which is in the kind of talent space and I'm sure we'll talk a littlebit more about that, but I'm running the VP of marketing there, so runningthe operations from, you know, demand to brand too, product marketing and afew things in between. So I think a lot about, you know, managing a team,growing a team scaling it and yes, we think about, you know, the year aheadas we're planning the year, thinking about definitely what we need to do asa business, but also some of the things we might want to leave behind, which Ithink brings us to this conversation for sure. That's a fun winding journeythat it's gonna be fun to just kind of tap into some of that today with you.Well, let's jump in here. So we have a list of five things, right, five thingsthat we're going to resolve not to do and I'll just throw it back to you,give us the first one what's something that you're saying? I don't want to dothis this next year, right? Yes. One is, don't confuse urgent with important. Ithink a lot of people hear about this, I'll give you kind of my perspective onwhy it's so important. You know, people talk about and and hopefully a lot ofpeople think about, you know that I have seen the Eisenhower Matrix, if youhaven't, you should definitely google it. It's this idea that I think a lotof times in our lives, especially in...

...our work, you know, we'll get a slack,will get an email and we almost assigned something to get done today orthis week and we kind of naturally assign importance with urgency. Likejust because something is said to get done today, we almost automaticallyassume that it is important. I think I've been really catching myself,especially in covid era thinking like what is actually really important in amoment and what is just seemingly urgent and that's why, you know, it'svery important. Always as you get a request, one of the things that therules I apply is slack and email are really good for telling you what'surgent. They're usually bad at telling you what's important, but your calendarand of course you're okay rs and goal setting that you should be doing, butespecially your calendar on a weekly basis should be telling you what'simportant, Not always good to telling you what's urgent, but you need to findthat balance between the two and so one of the things I always do is, how do welook at our calendar because you're making those decisions of like, when doI have to meet with certain people? How do you prioritize those things? Howmuch time do you set aside for working blocks? Hopefully you're doing that.But those are the decisions you've already made of where your time shouldbe spent in the rank order. But a lot of times we get distractions and we say,oh, maybe something's origin. So how do we actually make sure we're alwaysaware and think about that Eisenhower Matrix. We don't have time to gothrough it. I can talk for an hour about it, but how do you always knowand ask yourself, is this truly important and urgent or just urgent?Yeah. Actually, so last month on B two B growth, we did a throwback series andwe referenced believe it was kevin Cruz, but he talks about, he interviewed allof these like billionaires and he compiled like time management tips,right? And the most important takeaway from that whole episode for me andbringing it back really was the idea of time blocking, which I think issomething that's talked a lot about in in marketing or highly like efficientsuccessful people. I heard that so much, right? But we go through seasons wherelike we're really busy or we're really not and to have that consistency toactually work us towards like, okay, I'm putting this on my calendar, I'mputting this in my schedule and I'm doing that consistently. It will helpyou really determine what's most important right now. So I love this onebecause I raised my hand as so guilty of the slack hits, the email hits andall of a sudden I'm just, I'm just distracted. Do you find that personallyfor you? You're kind of that personality type? Yeah, no, absolutely.And I'm guilty of it too. You know, I'm the first to be guilty to like say Ihave an idea or there's something came in or we heard, you know, from beingthe Ceo or someone, we have an idea. You know, it's like part of themanagement is definitely deciding what to pass along. But I'm the type, if Iget excited about something, I, it's very hard for me to hide it. I thinkone of those two things I actually do myself that I try to empower my team todo. I think the first one you mentioned by the way the calendar ring is verypowerful, there's two others, One is, um, the idea of big rocks is veryimportant and I try to instill that in our team, it's very hard to do. ButStephen Covey did this like ages ago and there's a funny video because itseems so old, but it's still so relevant. It's this idea that you tryto fill a jar and you start with the pebbles and sand, you won't leave roomfor the actual big rocks, but if you start with the big rocks, um you willowe the sand and pebbles will fill in and around it. And so the samecontainer can hold much more if you start with the big rocks. And that isactually I try to instill that like what are the three things you're gonnado this week that are absolute priority. It's so natural for people to startlisting four and five and six and seven. But on my team, how I managed and how Itried, it's like, what are the real top three? Yes, you can list other thingsif you really need to. But I just want to hear about those big three becausethose are the needle movers and then ruthlessly prioritizing. We literallyused to do this in my previous organization to, it's like how do youruthlessly prioritize? And it's an amazing action to take. If someonegives you something to do and says, this is urgent, go back to that personand actually have an honest conversation saying, hey, I have theseother three things that I was really prioritizing help me rank, order this,Help me put this in stack rank this.

It's so funny, A lot of people don'ttake that step, but it's a really human natural thing to just go back and asklike, hey, I have these other priorities and it doesn't have to beneither condescending nor aggressive. It could just be like, hey, I kind ofneed your advice. Like where do you think this stack ranks helped meunderstand the importance. I know the urgency help me understand theimportance. So those are some things that I'm introducing. Yeah, the overcommunication of where something is on the priority list is so helpful for theteam. But it also shows that if you know to your boss or whoever, like itshows that you're taking responsibility right? Like that. You're reallythinking through the process, you're really owning it and going, okay,what's most important to our business right now? What's most important to ourdepartment right now? So that's really ruthless priority. I love how you saidthat. I think that's a really good way of thinking about it. Let me ask youthis, you say that you talk about the top three every week, what does thatlook like and how does that compare to maybe your quarterly goals or longerterm goals. I think that's a great segue into actually number two for mebecause I think what we just talked about is very effective on a dailyweekly basis. I think the second rule, I called it in my kind of list is I'mthinking about the year, Don't sweat the small stuff or don't get distractedby the small stuff, but really what that is, is like think about the bigbets like what are the actual needle movers over the course of a quarter,half a year, maybe even more because I think the top three, you know, it is areally good thing for weekly, but I think it realistically when you'resending okay are so you're sending kind objectives of the quarter, you need tothink a longer time horizon and there's gonna be more things to do than justthree. I think a lot of companies actually forget to set those like makethose big bets. Um and I've been through that, especially when you'resmaller, I don't know, people listening in there and you know, either seedstage or series A series B it's very easy to not have an okay our process.But I'll tell you like as a manager, even for yourself, just setting at thebeginning of a quarter the goals that you hope to achieve, even if they'recomplete assumptions, it's so incredibly powerful because when you'reon the grind of building a business and by the way, this was true google towhen we have tens of thousands of people but okay, ours are so wellestablished in organizations like that. It's almost harder when you're smaller.I think you have to because you'll see time goes by and all of a sudden threemonths ago, a quarter goes by and you almost don't remember how much youachieved, but if you look back at the original list, you can have made a lotof progress. The question then becomes how do you set those priorities? That'sthe hard part. And just one of the things I'll just share on that and thepauses somewhere in the business, even if you don't have metrics, there aregoals that exist because even if you're at seed stage, there's someone eitherthe Ceo or the head of finance, like goals are being set and communicatedwhether it's to a board or investors etcetera, goals exist. So it's a matterof figuring out starting with the business, what are the business goals?What is the board expecting investors expecting those things exist if you'rein a private company in public? You know, a lot of the stuff is public andthen the second piece is think about like what is the rest of theorganization doing? You know, ask around like is your product team, dothey have a bunch of releases happening that you can support if you're inmarketing, but it can also be any other CS like wherever you are in theorganization and then only then do you set your own kind of make up your owngoals? So for me that's a big part of it is definitely think about, okay. RSin the quarter and then think about what are other teams in theorganization? What is the business expecting? So that your, yourpriorities almost fall into that. Mm I love that. And I totally agree. Theearlier the better. So let me give you a story. Last company I worked forintroduced okay Rs But we were already scaling and growing quite a bit right.So then the headache that it is to try to implement and share the vision of anokay our system when you're already moving so fast, like you can do itright if you're listening to this and you aren't there yet. Like I don't, Idon't want to discourage you. I want to encourage you into it. But I will saylike the earlier on the better because you set that culture early and it'slike we already have the format, we already know where to reference allthis stuff. It's already built in versus like ah man, well now we haveall these people that were trying to...

...like align and you know, so just leadfrom the top and start that now or lead from wherever you are in theorganization and and read up on it. There's so many videos on Youtube thatcan help you with Okay. Rs to like, but I just think the earlier the better forthat because it's such a headache once you have a lot of people involved. Ithink that reframe is so important to like it's, it's really can't, it won'twork if it feels like, oh it's a chore. We have to do an upper managementdecided and the ceo said we're going to do with the power of it. Why I'mrealizing how important it is and how now I want every single person thatvery clearly defined objectives and key results is. You see how powerful as itis as a motivator. Like when you launch a campaign we had this campaign we werelaunching, we said at the outset, you know, last year we did this campaignsimilar and we had about 1500 leads come in. RM Q. LS. And we said, what ifwe doubled it? What if we got to 3000? And then you had people like you hadthe project manager on the team almost accounting everyone else, even seniormanagement, even the ceo being like, we need to get to 3000. Like we'reclearing the calendar, going back to ruthless prioritization. The reason weknew like this campaign, we had a goal and everyone on the team becameobsessed more than I did. I wanted 3000. Sure. And compensated on that in a way,you know, like that's my goal. But it became everyone's goal. And so when youset those objectives, even if they're crazy or unachievable, honestly, likeit's still rallies someone and it it really inspires them to to all focusedon one thing and it can be very powerful. So okay, so don't getdistracted by the small stuff that's our our second on the list. One of thethings here that to be thinking about is like big creative campaigns acrosschannels, right? Like so for marketing, like where are we going to create buzzand and kind of move the needle. Talk to me a little bit about how you thinkabout that. So it's not just the small stuff, but it's like this is reallywhat we're focused on. Yeah, it's such a good point. I'll give again, we cantalk a lot more about this. But I think the quick insight is even as a leader,you know, it says marketers, a lot of us are probably perfectionist and I'mdefinitely guilty of this where like I want to edit, you know, the one pieceof content we have or even the social post. But actually what I've beenreally realizing, especially as you think about, you know, when I do 2022planning actually looking at targets for 2023 and that's just like,especially at my place in the organization, if you're a VP or aheadof let alone into your sea level, you know, you're thinking years ahead. Andso this idea that you can't, you really can't be sweating the small stuff andwhat I really recommend people do. And I've been doing this is like, it's alsonot about the marketing to just invent things, right? It really is kind ofgoing back to what I was saying, like let's look at what is the boardexpecting? What is the business set to do and then asked a series of questionslike what is marketing's role in it? Okay let's say you have to close 100deals. You've said you're gonna close 100 deals in Q. One. Okay. What ismarketing's role or the expectations of marketing? How many of those are gonnabe marketing source or marketing originated? How many of those are gonnabe marketing influence? Maybe it's 100 align on those expectations and thensay okay how do we get there? Some of them might come from product releasesand that's the idea is that cross sell Upsell is it um you know those newdeals or they are we doing the legacy products or some of the new products ortheir new segments we're going into. There's all these questions to ask isyou're setting those big priorities and that's why I think about you can eitherget caught in the linkedin posts or the twitter, the tweet or the or theinstagram post or really have like this strategic view and whatever you are inthe organization. I think starting from the top down and thinking about likehow do I contribute even in the smallest way to the biggest metric? Ithink that's important and then marketing really to me has to fill inthe gaps. You either supporting some of those things like product launches.Okay how do we activate product, its product, marketing is probably demand,it's probably content. Like all of us need to come together to launch a newproduct or a new segment, but then there are other things were like, hey,we don't have a product launch. Maybe we have a lull for six months andthat's where you introduce events.

That's when you introduce campaigns,Maybe you want to kind of come up with something new and creative that youhaven't done before. And that's why I think then that your own big bets kindof come in in that way. So that's how I think about it. There's probably a lotof different frameworks for it that we can discuss too. But that's at the highlevel how I think about it. There's so much to think about their, the onething that you said that you're really sticking out to me is like rightquestions, right results. Because if we have the wrong questions or we don'task enough questions and we're just trying to, you know, I wouldn't saywe're trying to just get by right. But if you ask the right question to theright person, it can really help give you that like, okay, this is the bigthing that we need to be focused on and like you said, when you're really highup and you're thinking further out, those conversations are vital andmaking sure that you're, you are asking the strategic question. It's like sucha big deal. All right. So we have first one. Don't confuse urgent withimportant second don't get distracted by the small stuff. Here's the thirdone. Don't copy and paste expand on that a little bit for me. What doesthat all entail? Yeah, I think this one, you know, it could have been true. Ithink even as we were entering Covid, I think a lot of people realize that someof the old ways we're no longer going to apply. But I think it's it's beeninteresting because I have heard this, you know, as we we we work in thetalent space, work with HR leaders. I think there's a sense that there'sgoing to be a return to normalcy and that we can kind of go back to the waythings were. I think a lot of people have realized it's probably notrealistic. But I actually realized like this is such an opportunity, especiallyfor our team to kind of re imagine everything where I think this ongoinguncertainty is going to exist? Like they were kind of continue being hybrid.We're going to continue being, you know, remote and we I'm managing a globalteam, I almost can't predict where I'm going to hire my next marketer. Youknow, it's kind of wherever the talent is will go and we don't know where themarket's going ahead. And also like the speed with which competitors areintroduced. You know, it's so easy to start a business, there's so muchfunding. There's like there's so much uncertainty. So for me, I'm like reallybig right now. I'm taking the playbook from the past year and saying, how dowe kind of rip it apart? Like what if we? Re envisioned everything? And to us,this might be a crazy thing, but I'll tell you like it's just, I feel soempowered when I decided to do this, we're actually looking at all of ourhistorical metrics and like our historical team structure and I'm justrevisiting all of it. And so as we enter the new year. Um, and these arenot easy things, right? Because people, like some kind of sense of, you know,like this is the way things were. But yeah, exactly. Yeah. But this idea oflike where does the content sit and what are the objectives of content?Right. This idea of like how does actually content play in salesacceleration and how do they actually almost become unified partners with theBDR SDR team and not just like, you know, a lot of companies will thinkabout content as the blog, um, or the linkedin channel or their tweets orwhatever, but it's so much bigger than that. It actually is an incrediblypowerful tool that I really believe sits across the whole stack all the wayto the sail all the way to renew ALs. And so that changes the way you mightstructure a team and changes the, okay, our escape as it might change evendiscussions you have internally to say, hey, maybe the board shouldn't just behearing about M. Qs. And leads anymore from the marketing team. What aboutrenewal's? What about how we accelerate sales cycles And there's a lot of theseconversations that need to happen. Please go ahead. Okay. Wait. Because Iwant to hear you expand on the renewal's portion. Like when you're reimagining this, thinking about it, how do you see content and that kind oflike fused together or what's the connection you started to draw? There'stwo things I've been thinking a lot about one and this is a perfect example.Maybe this is kind of no brainer, but customer marketing is, is a veryimportant role. I think that a lot of organizations don't hire for early andI didn't actually in the past year and a half or so ago. But it's veryimportant because you think about how are we actually maintaining therelationships? Of course you have an amazing customer success team, butthat's the reality is, you know, there are a lot of times in the weeds,they're like making sure the product is...

...working really well. They're looking atkind of the day to day, week to week operations. Are they seeing growth? Butthey're not necessarily always kind of creating the love within theorganization saying, hey, do you need advice from another customer? Do youwant to get invited to a customer community event? Do you want to give usfeedback on the future product roadmap and these are all basics, I think whenyou're in large organizations like a google, they're just happeningsomewhere. But establishing that function early and really thinkingabout, okay, how does customer marketing play in? But then what is therole of content and community? And that's a really important question Alot of companies aren't thinking about, I definitely wasn't until more recentlybecause companies might love you, but they might need advice and okay, wellwe just finished stage one, we finished the pilot. We're about to scaleeveryone else or hey, we want to expand to our frontline workers. It's aperfect example and this is a lot of technologies people are sellingprobably we oftentimes optimized for the desk worker, you know, slack etcetera. If you think about all these technologies, we talk about every daythat we are using right now, zoom et cetera there for a certain part of thepopulation. But we're about, we actually have an offering for frontline.No one has really solved that in the whole industry. So this idea that youknow that we can just, anyone can come and answer that for them is impossible.It's actually going to be about community, about learning from eachother and then about generating content and that inspires the next company orthe next batch to actually say, oh, you know, this is how this can be done now.That is all renewal and Upsell by the way because these are existingcustomers. But I think the way we actually leverage marketing to connectthe right people to create community to create content from the learnings.Those are all the things that I'm thinking about. How do we actuallyautomate and scale that there's a lot of learning to be done. But once weestablish the process, I really want to scale that. Hey everybody Olivia hereas a member of the sweet fish sales team, I wanted to take a second andshare something that makes us insanely more efficient. Our team uses lead I. Q.So for those of you who are in sales or sales ops, let me give you some context.You know how long gathering contact data can take so long and with lead I.Q. What once took us four hours to do now it takes us just one that is 75%more efficient. We are so much quicker with outbound prospecting andorganizing our campaigns is so much easier than before. I suggest you guyscheck it out as well. You can find them at least I Q dot com. That's L E A D IQ dot com. Alrighty. Let's jump back into the show. Some people need torewind the last two minutes and re listen to that because I think thatthought process, some of the questions that you're pondering, you don't haveto give an answer. I think this is something I'm learning in podcasting alot right now is when we just focus on what is a strategic question, what'ssomething like you kind of brought it up? Okay. This is the historical waywe've done it. I want to just imagine what it'd be like. I'm not even sayingwe have to blow it up. I'm not even saying we have to change it. But when'sthe last time that we said this isn't just like concrete the way we're forsure doing it over the next 12 months. And when you start to think aboutcustomer marketing, you're right. A lot of big companies get it really wellright because they got the budget to hire somebody to think that way.Whereas a lot of smaller companies are going, alright, well we just have to,you know, we just have to get more customers. Like that's, that's the onlythought process. But I'll give you another story. Another example, Spotify.I know they're a huge example but a way that they've done this really well toget hyper individual. I'm an early adopter and they sent me a message. Ican't even tell you how long ago this was man, this was probably severalyears ago, I had forgotten about it. They have a product team that wasdeveloping a new product and it was going to basically be like think of aalmost like a tablet for your car and it's gonna be, if you don't have aTesla, if you don't have like a newer...

...model car that has some epic big screenin it already. Go ahead. If you sign up for this, we'll send you one for free.So you're not on your phone while you're driving. Here's a, here's ascreen, right? So they're thinking about the customers that are already on.If you're already a customer, you're eligible, just give us your email, likesign up this little form, give us a little bit more detail on whatever Theymessaged me like two weeks ago and like they're still developing it. They'relike, hey, it's, it's ready for you. So like, and it's again, it's just likethey didn't have to do that right. They could have made it only available tonew customers. But it's this ongoing thought process of like how can we upour customer marketing, what other value can we add to them that it'sreally impressed me and that's a big example. But there's, there'sdefinitely other ones for sure. So I love this and that's a perfect exampleof like that's where you need to believe in not copying and pasting toenable an idea like that and that's why that's like such a big part of thatbecause the customer marketing piece is just one of them. You know, it's like,how do we actually think about the next year and actually try entirely newthings, it might, it might mean as another example for us, it's, you know,I think a lot of times people talk about this like no lead for movementand like really focusing and doubling down on a B M, but I'm like, it's atough transition and we're just going to do it and basically told the team islike, we're going to rip the Band Aid, I'm gonna start stop looking at ourenterprise funnel as a funnel entirely. I almost am starting theseconversations and basically need alignment all the way up to the boardis like, I actually don't want it to be about mpls and leads for a large partof our book of business because we have a target account list, we know thenamed accounts. How do we actually create a super high touch initiativesthat allow us to actually grow those businesses from? And that's theinverted pyramid, you know, there are a lot of models, but the, it's so hard tomake that pivot, like everyone talks about it on podcasts and I've beentalking about it for a long time to how do we do it? But we're doing it thisyear because I basically said, I refuse to copy and paste, I'm almost throwingaway the old benchmarks that we have and we're just going to create a newmodel and we're gonna try it, we're gonna try for Q one Q two, we're notgonna rip it completely, you know, we're gonna still make sure we'recreating a funnel, so we don't kill the business, but I'm gonna invest heavilyinto like what if we just inverted it and actually did a large part ofinvestment, focusing on the accounts first and growing it from the bottom up.So those are the things like you need to basically be comfortable with notjust copying and pasting and trying new things that is, we could spend so muchtime there. I love that. And uh okay, let's keep things moving, So don't copyand paste brings us to number four. What do you got for this one? Yeah, soit's slightly different, but I think to enable everything we just talked about,especially some of the creative ideas. One of the things is hiring, you know,it's a huge challenge for us right now. How do we get the right people? Andwhat I learned, especially over the past year, because we're in the spacewhere the talent hiring space, but you talk to other marketers, it's reallyhard to hire out there. It's hard to retain talent. You know, the greatresignation of great, we call it the reassessment, it's real. And so the onething that's really important is don't overlook the talent you have right? Ithink a lot of times we start looking, we get this, this um we get obsessedwith this idea, like, oh, I need a new role, so I'm gonna go external. I'mgonna post it on linkedin? Like if you think about it, I'm gonna hire someonewhere do you go? You see your first thought is probably linked job board.Almost none of us say like, well let me think about the people that alreadyhave at the company and even if a tiny companies by the way. And so I'll shareone example from from us. You know, we're reporting on our event are bigyearly event called Gloat Live and it's a really big deal for the company. It'slike and of course as big as marketing makes it, but we wanted to make it areally big deal. And I actually did not hire an events and field marketer inthat time. So I didn't have anyone to own the globe line. And so instead ofsaying like, oh I have to hire someone or bring on an agency or lookexternally, I said what if we just created a team from within? And so yes,I had a couple of people from marketing and I had some designers from marketinghelp. But then we pulled in designers...

...from the product team, we pulled incustomer success manager who's supporting. We pulled in someone fromthe product that there is someone, we have a product designer. We also had aproduct manager, we got almost every executive involved in different waysand not just to present, but to really think about like how to activate. Wehad office managers involved to make it a really powerful in person experience.So we literally had this massive working team almost created a team andevents team, just using talent from within. And we've seen that for parttime projects like that, it's an incredibly powerful thing. I think weoften overlook the power of just assembling a team and swarming intosomething, but it's also for hiring people. One of my like the most amazingtalents in the organization right now was an account manager who actuallyrose basically raised her hand and said, hey, I'm kind of interested inmarketing and we gave her an opportunity as an account, as amarketing manager and as a marketing coordinator really to start and nowshe's actually leading incredible initiatives, leading some of my biggestkind of campaigns and also it's like a special ops person, but it was allbecause we gave a chance to someone from within that's not always possible.Sometimes you have to go and like you need the right experience, you need theright, you know, skill set. But there's amazing talent within your four walls.And so rule number four don't for 2022 for me and then everyone else out theredon't overlook the talent you have. So let me ask a couple of follow upquestions here because I think this is one that I would definitely be behind,but I also can hear a couple of questions just rattling around in somepeople's minds, one being great, you were able to assemble this team, right?But how do you know if you're not like this is just too much work on theirplate? I think that's an instant reason why people would go out before hiringwithin or, or forming that special team to swarm. It's okay, well we're alreadykind of all hands on deck pretty full. So how did you assess that? To know wecan pull this off and then I'll have one more question, but answer that onefirst, for sure. I love that. That actually goes back to the globe isappropriate to just say what we do because it's like something thatquestion I actually think about on a day to day basis, we basically createdsomething called the talent marketplace, which is allows people on one side, weunderstand the skills within an organization and dynamically match themto kind of work and jobs to be done. And that could be full time roles butcan also be projects etcetera. What you're talking about is actually thenumber one objection we always faces, like when we sell our product and it'sactually an amazing reality, what ends up happening. And we, so we work withlike Unilever Mastercard, you know, hsBC, massive companies nestle like youname them. And what happens is that people actually get more engaged intheir day to day job because they are actually contributing in somethingbigger than their day to day job and then we hear this time and time againand it's obviously really hard to quantify, but they, we actually have soUnilever always measures how many hours of productivity were unlocked and thisis purely for projects, not full time roles, not jobs, which is theybasically in a couple of years of working with us have had 650,000 hoursunlocked and their retention and we're always measuring also impact onretention and all that. And so people, it's, it's this weird thing where we'rein a reality where people are burnt out, they're tired. But a lot of that if youreally dissect is I think people, it's, they, they feel like their work is kindof meaningless or they're not working on things that matter to them. And sowhat this kind of project, like everyone that worked on global live wasexhausted at the end for sure. But if I asked all of them like how engaged theywere, how passionate they were about glowed, how excited they were. I almostguarantee you, we, we didn't do this survey, I kind of tempted. Now, Ialmost guarantee you every single one of those people feels more of like aloyalty and engagement to gloat because we were part of something reallyspecial and meaningful that everyone at the company was, you know, I'm kind ofnoticing in a part of so I guess that's kind of my perspective on that questionis a really important one though, I think you hit on something thatactually brings us back to when you were talking about customers in thatsense of community. So it can happen with employees and it can happenexternally, right? Where it's like, you connect people back to community, youconnect people something bigger than...

...themselves. Like, whoa, they thought ofme, it's it's the same external as it is internal to just go that Yeah, it'sgonna build brand loyalty, but I almost don't even like calling it that it'sjust like this, it's essentially it's just human connection and it deepens,oh, they see my value in a department that's not normally mine in a seat,that's not normally like I'm not normally invited to, so there's a lotthere, let's let's round it out here. And the fifth one is this, don't forgetto recharge, why is this one? Uh something that's really important toyou personally? I think as a manager, as a leader, it's, you have to reallybe thinking about this going into the next year. I mean it's been a reallytough two years and you know, I'm based in new york right now, you know thateven the past few weeks, it's like never ending, kind of the uncertaintyand so just really acknowledging that everyone's been working really hard,all the things I just talked about right there. They're hard, they're noteasy things, they're exhausting too ruthlessly prioritize, right? And tofocus on big things, right? Like to not sweat. The small stuff takes energy tolike not confuse urgent with important takes energy to try something new. Soyou don't copy and paste. These are not easy things. I think that we have anamazing opportunity to focus on those and do all those in the new year, butall of that can be really exhausting and I think there's, you know, we'reworking hybrid were glued to screens, there's all this data around obviouslythat and the toll that's taking on us. I think the longer we stay here, kindof the human connection piece gets harder. Um I think really prioritizingas a leader, both taking time yourself, but as an individual to first andforemost, just realize that you are better off for yourself. And even forthe company, like if your company person, you know, if you want to like acareer oriented person, it's actually better for your career if you takemoments to recharge and there's this amazing cartoon, I don't know ifthere's a way for you to maybe share with the audience later, but listen,molly always have these great cartoons. But there's this, there's this visualbasically of like a straight line work work, work, work work, work work andthen you get sick and it's a cliff and that's the reality, right? Most peoplethink like, oh, I like the idea of I'll sleep when I'm dead, I'll rest. Youknow, whenever, like the rest is for the weak like that permeates thesociety even now, which is crazy to me. But people don't realize that the realway to do it and then the alternate right next to that of the peak and thenthe fall is just a step ladder. It's like work, recharge, work, recharge,work recharge. And then what happens is at the end of the line one person isstill like on the up and up and the other one is exhausted and kind ofready to quit or give up or maybe even worse. So for me that's a reallyimportant one is as an individual, recognize the recharging is a sign ofstrength. It's really important. It will make you better at your work. Umand also more pleasant person. It will make you more creative, innovative.There's tons of science around that. We won't get into that. But then second asa leader and this is really important is really role modeling it andcelebrating it because a lot of times we might say that, but we don'tactually celebrate it. So there's little things I'm trying to do. LikeI'm taking off in two weeks in the very near future and I've been very clearwith my team, you can't reach me, you can't slack me, you can email me, Iwill be off the grid just no, no negotiation. If there's a superemergency you can call me but I am not checking and then when I come back, Iwant people to show I'm gonna show off my pictures. I want people to show offpictures of how they relax even if it was a staycation. But I want toactually create an environment where that celebrated and I think a lot of uscan actually do more of that. I love that. I think sharing when we come backis also a, it's a fun part of like how you would build that culture that wedon't think about. Like you might celebrate on the front end like oh yeah,go take time off. That's pretty, I would say that's getting them a littlebit more common. But like when you come back, how you respond, who asks youabout it, you know, you might have had a great time and if it's reinforced inthe culture there, it's just another way to make it a deeper, more impactfulkind of oh we celebrate rest in a, in a...

...unique way in our organization, in ourcompany. So I love that man, this is a great list. I'm gonna recap us realquick. But before I read the five, I will say I'm taking away ruthlesspriority as a new phrase. That was all the way back from number one. But Ijust, I think that that is A way to think about things. If you're naturallyjust a busy body or you have a lot on your plate which I know if you'relistening to this, you probably do. So thanks for making time to listen. Right?But ruthless priority is is a phrase that I think would really be helpfulover the next 12 months and just into the future. So okay, here's our here'sour list. We got five. We don't confuse urgent with important, we don't getdistracted by the small stuff, we don't copy and paste, we don't overlook thetalent we have and we don't forget to recharge an excellent list of fivethings, sort of our anti resolutions. Anything you would add before we wrapthis episode. No, I just hope everyone stays healthy and happy and wherewhether you're listening in the new year wherever and whenever you'relistening, I think it's uh it's gonna be an exciting year. There's a lot ofopportunities in the marketing space, it's an ever changing landscape. Somethings are going to be exciting, some things are challenging, but I think Ialways seeing it from the reframe of an opportunity and you stick to that lastpoint, don't forget to recharge and role model and I think we can do a lotof great things that push the marketing industry forward. So thanks to everyonethat anyone that listened for sure how can people stay connected to the work?You're doing plug gloat a little bit. Just give us ways that we can stayconnected. Yeah, absolutely. So linkedin, definitely the place where Ispent most of my time, just look up Ruslan, T R U S L A N T. Hopefully youfind me that way. And yes, I'm VP marketing and gloat. Um yeah, we'redoing some amazing work if you know, especially large organizations is kindof our sweet spot right now. We're working with some of the largest brandsto really help them unlock the talent within those organizations, understandthe skills and capabilities that exist today, where they need to build upskills and capabilities moving forward and then helping them dynamically matchthat, you know, jobs and work to be done. So whether you're launching anice cream brands somewhere, I'm just assembling a team to do an event orhiring from within or finding mentors, etcetera. So, um, yeah, if anyone is inthe market for a talent marketplace absolutely reach out to me. But ifanyone wants to chat marketing or exchange ideas, linkedin is definitelybest. Great. And we'll make sure we link to your linkedin in the show notestoo. So people can, can jump over and, and also to gloat as well. Thanks forlistening to B two B growth today, you can connect with me as well on linkedin.You just search Benji block and would love to talk about marketing businesslife over there. And then if you haven't subscribed to be, to be growthyet do so Wherever You're listening to this podcast is helpful to us and thenyou never miss an episode. So thanks for listening. Keep doing work. Thatmatters in 2022. It's gonna be a fantastic thank you so much. Benji.Thank you everyone. Mhm. Is the decision maker for your productor service a bdb marketer. Are you looking to reach those buyers throughthe medium of podcasting? Consider becoming a co host of GDP Growth. Thisshow is consistently ranked as a top 100 podcast in the marketing categoryof apple podcasts and the show gets more than 100 and 30,000 downloads eachmonth. We've already done the work of building the audience so you can focuson delivering incredible content to our listeners. If you're interested, emailLogan at sweet fish Media dot com.

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