Vitamins, Painkillers, and the Cure with Mario Paganini

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode Benji interviews Mario Paganini, Head of Marketing at STORD.

When it comes to marketing our B2B product/service we desire to position ourselves as the cure to our customers problems. However, often we come off more as a vitamin or a pain killer rather than a true solution. In this enlightening discussion Mario walks us through how to separate from our competition and shows the work in action on their brand new website.

See the new STORD website, click here.

Welcome back to be to be growth. I'myour host Benji block today. I'm joined by Mario Paganini and a new friend,excited to get to chat with Mario Mario welcome into B two B growth. Yeah,excited to to be here. Thanks for inviting me and really looking forwardto chatting. If this is anywhere near as fun as our first intro call, it'sgonna be a good time. Yeah, I'm thrilled to get to talk about severalthings within marketing with you, but you're the head of marketing at stored,you're doing a lot of exciting things and we're going to dive into some ofthat today. But really what resonated with me as we talked previously man wasthat there's a lot of people are going to feel this right in marketing but weall want to have the product that's not just nice to have, but it's need tohave right. Like we all want to have that product where we're not justperceived to have long term benefits, but like we want people to know why wematter now and I guess where I would start this conversation with you Mariois why do you feel like even though we all want that it's so complicated toactually be clear about the problem we solved. Why do you think that is? Yeah.So you know, I think back and a a previous boss used to say this all thetime. They used to say, you know when you're starting a company, when you're,when you're building a a product, you want to be a painkiller, not a vitaminand you know, for for years that really resonated with with me and made a lotof sense, but more recently I kind of had this this epiphany and don't meanthat throw shade at this person who I don't know, but I realized that, youknow, that's not really true, that's not the north Star that that you shouldbe looking for when you're building a product, when you're founding a companythat I would take it one level further and say that when I look out into themarket, there's really three types of companies and I kind of group everyoneinto one of these buckets, there's there's vitamins, there's, you know,painkillers and then there's, you know, true cures. And so when you dissectthat, you know, certainly very intrinsically obvious, you know, no onewants to be a vitamin, you know, you think about that and you know, you'reyou're a healthy person, you're you're an athlete, you're in good shape, youknow, you take a multivitamin and maybe you're getting like half a percentbetter, Maybe it's doing nothing. You know, you got some sort of of illnessthat vitamin is is is not gonna cure it, then, you know, you have a painkillerand that provides a good bit of value, you know, let's say that I've I'vebroken my my arm and you know, I'm in just excruciating pain, you know, Ineed to think straight, I need to figure out how to get to the doctor, Ineed to, you know, I'm I'm in shock and you know, I take some sort ofpainkiller and that's going to numb the pain. That's going to help me to tothink straight, it's going to, you know,...

...in the very short term helped me outquite a bit, but at the end of the day I'm going to look down and see in myarms still broken and ultimately what I truly need is a cure and, you know,that cure for broken arm is, you know, I've got to go find a good doctor thatthat person's got to, you know, set my arm, do whatever surgery may benecessary, put it in a cast and, you know, set me on a road to recovery sothat I'm ultimately, you know, as good as I was before, if not better. And soultimately kind of, every single company in my mind fits into one ofthose buckets and I think to get to the root of of your question and it reallycomes down to really peeling back the onion and understanding what is thefundamental market inefficiency? What is that deepest level challenge that isimpeding your I. C. P. Your customer base from being successful and so I'llgive you a example in stored world. So what we do is we take all of thephysical logistics services you need for an end m supply chain, sotransportation, how you move your products throughout your supply chainwarehousing where you store them fulfillment, how you get that into thehands of your end customers or your your training partners and then wecouple that with all of the technology you need to integrate and manage thatwhole experience. And so the genesis of of why stored started this way and ourstrategy as we look down in the market and we saw that this market was sounbelievably fragmented and there were individual players kind of solving allof these painkiller challenges, you know, finding a little bit more extrawarehouse space. So, you know, someone provides you that painkiller, morewarehouse space or you know, I need to connect this software to that software,I need to integrate this trading partner with my er p some, we'll go outand do that. But ultimately what that means is that for you to have a end toend supply chain that really succeeds in, you know, modern omnichannelcommerce, you've got to go out and try to piece together 4567 of thesedifferent solutions and, you know, you're out there trying to keep up withthe amazons of the world who have been able to build out this whole experienceon, on their own. And so when we look at this market for restored, we reallysaid, hey, you know, the problem isn't that people need more warehouse space.So the problem isn't that, you know, they need to integrate all these tools.The ultimate problem is that people need a supply chain that connects theircustomers. They need the technology necessary to manage and optimize thatand they need a solution that's going to scale with them a period of highgrowth. Their supply chain capacity needs to expand, you know slower season,you need to be able to retract. And so for us we realize, you know, the onlyway we could really solve the problem of dated, inefficient supply chains andreally move them into the omni channel future is to connect all of thesepieces and then once you are able to...

...piece all these different toolstogether, then we really could go to market and deliver this, you knowcliche but you know amazon prime level supply chain to to anyone who wants it.Well I love that, but I have some initial pushback because here's what Ithink when you use that image. So when I hear like painkiller, I'm thinkingthink about how hard it is to talk to somebody who's on painkillers, right?Because they are in a state of mind where like you're not going to have acoherent conversation with them. And I think that happens in marketing all thetime that happens in business all the time. We know that we have a cure for aproblem that they have, right? But they have been solving it with painkillersfor so long that there's a communication breakdown. So I wonderfrom your experience, like how do you try to overcome that objective andmaybe beyond even just stored, what would you say to those that are in thatplace where they're going okay, we know we have a cure but we need to be clearright in our communication to show what you're doing right now to just kind ofkill the pain isn't going to work long term, isn't the best solution. Yeah, so I'll give you 33 pieces of ofadvice here. So you know, number one, the best marketing and really I wouldeven argue any marketing that is efficacious, needs to be both easy tounderstand and impossible to ignore. So, you know, obviously if I'm, you know,your your customers kind of hopped up on painkillers, their attention spanmight be extra low, but even, you know, the clear minded sober of us have sucha you know, short attention span and you know, us as marketers, we oftenmake the mistake of thinking that people want to come in and you know,give a crap about our products and invest time to read up and look throughall of our stuff and you know, that's that's simply not the reality. And so,you know, great marketing is in a very, very brief period of time, someone canunderstand exactly what you do and at the same time you've given them somesort of reason whether that be how you speak, how you visually presentyourself, how you package yourself all of the above that makes you kind ofimpossible to ignore. So I think that's, you know, tip number one, tip numbertwo is, you know, and I, I stole this from, from the good folks over at atgong, they're, they're kind of the, the goats as kind of sales and marketingadvice, but you know, one of one of their content folks once said, you know,if you're capable of describing a customer's problem more eloquently andmore clearly than they are, you're always gonna sound like the solution.So I think that's ultimately tip number number two here and then last and notleast, you know, this isn't the sexiest solution, but sometimes you have torealize that you are never going to be able to sell this whole vision out ofthe gate and so I'll use the storage...

...example, we have this end end solutionthat encompasses all of the physical logistics, you need, all of thesoftware, you need for this best in class, competitive advantage, drivingsupply chain. But if we said, you know, alright, we're only going to acquirecustomers if they say alright store and I'm just gonna stop everything I'mdoing, I'm going to give it all to you, you know, you know, we, we, I don'tthink we'd be anywhere near as well off as we are right now. And so part of thebattle is realizing that, you know, sometimes you have to figure out,alright, here's my best wedge and that you don't need to hit the home run offyour first swing. And so for a storage example, it's like, you know what,alright, if we can get into account an account nearly by at least in the shortterm, kind of masking ourselves as a pain killer of oh you need someadditional warehouse capacity in the Chicago area, Great, we've got you andyou know, we will solve that specific problem as well, if not better thananyone else and then once we've got you there, we have all of these mechanismsthat we can kind of guide you down that path, then change your thinking two ohwow, you know what, like it's great that I got that additional warehousecapacity, but you know, ultimately I've have much bigger problems with mysupply chain, you know, do I always want to be just, you know, one stepaway from needing additional capacity, do I always want to be relying on, youknow, point to point solutions, you know, logging into multiple differentplatforms and you know from there, once we've proven value at a smaller scale,we can expand out. So, you know, I think a lot of people believe that, youknow, they've got to come and hit that home run swing out of the gates,especially, you know, us as marketers who tend to, you know fantasize aboutwhat life really is, you know, on the ground for, for sales folks, you got torealize that, you know, what's your wedge, how can you get into an accountand then, you know, ultimately when the deal signed, that's not when youcelebrate, that's, you know, day one and the real battle starts after that.Yeah. Really addressing where someone is currently at, even when, you know,the cure goes beyond their current need, it's a huge deal. It's a big part ofthis process and one of the ways that I found so intriguing really, in ourfirst conversation, you guys decided to redo your website. Okay, now that atface value, I'm like, okay, I mean, what, what tech company doesn't want abetter website, but walk me through the thinking and what led to this decisionand then we're going to get pretty specific over the next few minutesbecause there was some strategy that I think for our listeners, they're gonnabe able to take away and apply to whatever B two B business they're in.Yeah, absolutely. You know, so I joined stored in the middle of the year andyou know, whenever a company gets a new marketing leader, the first thing thathe or she has to do is, you know, redo the website and so, you know, that's,that's very short, No, I'm just kidding. Actually, I've always kind of laughedat that cliche, It's kind of like, you...

...know, a sports team gets a new coachand you know, all of a sudden, you know, even if things were working beforethey've got to, you know, change up the team, trade some players and you know,I don't really think our job as marketing leaders is to kind of likepee on the sidewalk to like mark our, our space, like a dog that, you know,ultimately for us, it really came down to, you know, we, we looked at what wewere trying to accomplish, we we looked at how efficacious we had been atreally succeeding on delivering this, this vision in the market. And werealized that When you are trying to solve this challenge that we spent thelast 5, 10 minutes discussing of really genuinely not just selling someone anawesome solution, but helping someone to put the pieces together andunderstand that the entire way they've been looking at solving logisticsproblems to date has been, you know, very dated and antiquated. The only waythat you're going to succeed at doing that is really having best in classmarket and it comes down to that, you know, first thing I said, easy tounderstand, impossible to ignore. So we're we're looking at this challengewhere our go to market our platform is a complete deviation from how alltraditional, you know, third party logistics players have operating. Andwe looked at ourselves and said, you know, if we look like and smell likeanother third party logistics operator, were just absolutely kidding ourselves.If we think that we're going to have this, you know, drastically outsidesuccess and change the dynamics of the market, we realized that, you know, toooften we had, you know, prospects coming in, customers who were lookingat us as, you know, just a, you know, another alternative, another substituteto one of these other three pl players. And you know, realize that unless weare capable of changing that dynamic, we are not going to be able to continueachieving the outsized growth and results that we have. So we said, youknow, all right, we've got to kind of start from the ground up and figure outhow we can get to that point that, you know, anyone who interacts with storedsays, oh my God, you know, they're a logistics company, I can't believe theymade that, you know, this makes a lot of sense. I get it. You know, they'redifferent from all these other players who I won't name by name. Hey everyoneEmily brady with sweet fish here, If you've been listening to B two B growthfor a while, you know, we are big proponents of putting out originalorganic content on linkedin. But one thing that has always been a strugglefor a team like ours is easily tracking the reach of that linkedin content.That is why we are really excited about shield analytics. Since our teamstarted using shield, we've been able to easily track the reachingperformance of Arlington content without having to manually log itourselves. It automatically creates reports and generates dashboards thatare incredibly useful to determining things like what content has beenperforming the best, what days of the...

...week we're getting the most engagementand our average views proposed Shield has been a game changer for our entireteam's productivity and performance on linkedin. I highly suggest checking outthis tool. If you're publishing content on linkedin for yourself or yourcompany, you can get a 10 day free trial at shield app dot Ai or you canget a 25% discount with our promo code B two B growth. Again that Shield appdot Ai and the promo code is B the number to be growth all one word for a25% discount. Alright, let's get back to the show. Yeah. So here's what'sfascinating to me because I think the logic is there in a lot of othermarketing teams are a lot of other tech teams where they're like, okay, we havea solution that solves a specific thing where we have the cure, we want to beclear, but whether they're in their own weeds right, and they're just kind oflike the language they use on their site, the way that it's laid out, it'sit's at this point it still looks kind of slick, but it's still outdated,right, especially if you live in B two B sas world like you know who's pullingfrom who to make their website look like somebody else. So you guys took acompletely different approach. And the thing that I thought was interesting isyou basically made a sense that and like that that in and of itself ispretty odd. So explain how that that idea was even developed. So you'reyou're you're saying that the strategy of copying the stripe dot com circa2016 isn't the way to success and go get what you want to do. Their theircurrent sites, amazing the previous iteration, you know, huge, huge fan,but I just get a laugh out of it every time I you know, go check out a SAScompany's website and you know, I swear that after they launched that kind oflike you know, slanted visual and like medium fidelity devices like that waspopping up everywhere over that. But anyways, you know, credit wherecredit's due but certainly I don't, you know, ultimately if you aspire to standout from all of your peers copying your peers strategy is you know, theabsolute pretty much worst way to go about doing that. So for us, what weultimately are trying to achieve is we are pioneering a new category of supplychain services. So we call our solution cloud supply chain and you know, thesimplest way to think about that is you go back 20 years and enterprise I. T.Consisted of you having on premise server farms where your team was goingout and buying huge buildings and stuffing them full of computers andservers and memories so that you could support whatever cloud software everplatform you were running. And it was this constant cat and mouse game whereyou needed to keep up your physical infrastructure in order to keep pacewith your your customer growth and you...

...know you go back 20 years and that wasjust seen as you know the total normal if someone wasn't doing that you wouldlook at them like they were they were crazy. You know you fast forward to twotoday the last 5 10 years and you see that you know pretty much everyone isusing a service like amazon web services Microsoft azar and thesecompanies they're just plugging into to aws they're getting the cloud computingpower they need today they grow five X you over a year and you know theircapacity just magically skills with them and you know I don't think you'llfind a C. T. O. Out there that's like oh my God like I wonder if amazon hasenough servers Like are we gonna be okay? It's just you know it's a it'sit's basically become a utility and that's allowed these technical teams tofocus on you know what really matters best in class software, best in classuser experience, best in class reliability and they're not you knowworrying about this constant cat and mouse game. So Cloud supply chain isthe same concept for physical supply chain, you plug into stored, you geteverything you need today. And as you continue to grow, we're with a networkover 1000 warehouses and 20,000 carriers were able to just constantlygive you more and more capacity, identify the very best places and lightthat up for you. So the reason I say this is, you know, it helps to actuallyexplain this kind of sim city concept. So we thought about this idea of, ofcloud supply chain and how stored is almost like this magical abstractionlayer that is sitting on top of the entire supply chain and both managingthose physical interactions, but also optimizing all of it. So it's not justthe physical interactions within a warehouse or, you know, shipping. It'sthat, but it's also that kind of magical abstraction layer that's makingsure that you're not just storing your product somewhere and shipping it, thatyou're storing it in the absolute best place and you're shipping it with theabsolute best carrier and the best service level. And so, you know, wethought about how to how to do this and, you know, ultimately, you know, we weset out with the goal of really doing something that, you know, no one's everseen before. And so what we realized is that this idea of talking about Portaporch logistics, there's no better way to describe it than to actually showpeople what it looks like. We all know about supply chain. We all think aboutsupply chain. We all read about supply chain, but to the vast majority of usthat's kind of hidden in the background, you might see the ups or Fedex deliverytrucks showing up at your, your house. But everything prior to that last mileinteraction is just, you know, basically magic to you. And so what weended up doing for the site and we partnered with the ultimate goats, justtotal ballers as it relates to its design and web development. These guysstudio freight out of out of columbus...

...and um, you know, they, what theypulled off is spectacular. But essentially what, what we did with themwas we built out this, you know, as you said, whole supply chain city or youcan call it sim city where we built a live living, breathing three D world,showing everything from product coming in on a like large freight ship,container ship getting offloaded at the poor passed through to warehousingnetworks, moved into retail stores delivered ultimately to end customerson their porches. And so you know, if you can say porch to porch logistics,but you know, who wants to read a paragraph about that? What if we couldhave, you know, four words on, on the, on the hero and actually show you whatthis, what this looks like. And so you know, for us, the two things we'rereally trying to accomplish here is let's show people what this porch toporch logistics looks like in action and how can we metaphoricallyreinforced this theme. That story isn't just doing this for you that they aresitting on top of it and optimizing that whole experience. And so kind ofsmack dab in the middle of the world. We we built this giant control towerthat's peering down on the entire experience and controlling it. And youcan see on the site as product goes from, you know, getting unloaded fromcontainers at the ports all the way to, you know, customers porches, you seethese little green lights light up showing that whole process. And so, youknow, ultimately for for us it was, I don't know about you, but I'd muchrather, you know, see something interactive than stop and you know,read a paragraph of text on the sites. 100%. See that's, and that's the futureof not, not just websites, but like if you think about media in general rightnow, social media has moved all the video right? Like everything is amoving picture. There's not a lot of text left on the sites that are doingsignificantly well. And if you're gonna expect someone to come to your websiteand they're going to take the time to search you out. You want to make it assimple for them to understand as possible. And that's my main takeawayhonestly, from looking at the storage site, from talking to you Mario,there's this approach that I think is applicable across marketing. Anyonethinking about doing a rebrand on the website where you can say how do weobviously were not, maybe in the same market that stores in right, but likehow do we really begin to show someone what start to finish looks like in away that's not just words on the screen that makes my eyes glaze over. I don'tknow what that process looks like for each person listening individually, butto visualize how we could show the cure that we have in a step, one, step two,step three, your site made that really clear and when there was text, eventhough I'm not in the business you're in, I understood what you guys weredoing because I could see it and then...

...there's obviously just enoughdescription to where I want to keep looking because it's visually appealing.But then I'm reading because there's there's enough there to to kind ofexplain a little bit more in detail what was your biggest, I don't want tosay surprise, but like what was the most fun part of this project that, asyou were working on it and as you saw it come together. Yeah, so I thinkthere there are kind of 22 pieces of the puzzle that I thought were most funthat, you know, corny simple one, I'll get out of the way, you know just thatthe first day and so this whole experience on store dot com, it's, it'sactually not a video or a gift or or an image that the whole world is actuallyrendered live in the browser and so all of the animations, all the movement,all the, all the elements are living breathing live in the browser usingthree Js, you know shout out to the awesome bronco down in buenos are asfar as I'm concerned on on web development. So just the first day thatwe saw that actually live in the browser and at this point, you knownone of the site had been built around it but just that first proof of conceptbecause when we, we started out, you know, we, we had this vision but youknow we, we did go through and find like you know a few other examples ofpeople that had, you know, kind of done somewhat similar things but therewasn't a, you know roadmap, there wasn't a, oh okay cool. Like we canjust go look at this site and use that template or you know, we can go talk tothis person who has done this, you know, it really was, you know, first of itskind and so for a while, you know obviously we were confident that wewere gonna be able to pull it off but you know it's an unknown unknown, youwant to go copy stripes site and you're like, okay cool. You know, we just gotto work on and eventually we'll, we'll have a copy of stripes site, you wantto go do something that no one's ever done before. It's like, you know, youcan say, all right. I think we're gonna be able to do it, but nothing's forsure. And so the first day that we, we had that city up in the browser, thatwas, you know, just a spectacular moment. And then I think the, the otherone was this whole process. It didn't start from saying, all right, let's goredesign the website and then some patrick from the studio for a team justcame back like, alright Mario, like here's a fig file, here's what it'sgonna look like, you know, that's, that's not at all how we spent thefirst, probably, you know, two months of this process going through doingcustomer interviews, inter industry interviews, you know, running throughour whole leadership team, kind of going through a bunch of thoughtexercises, visual explorations and so you know, all of this groundwork wasset in terms of, here's exactly what we want to communicate who we want tocommunicate it to and you know, that's really all of that was out of the waybefore we even started really kind of any sort of visual exploration and then,you know, once we got all of this...

...framework and strategy peace settled,you know, the team really went to work and just brainstorming and bringingback a bunch of different mood boards, a bunch of different styles, you know,you would be, you wouldn't believe it if, you know, I showed you that, youknow, behind the scenes, fig MMA, like this is the first set of things welooked at, because there are probably, you know, 100 different things in thereand you know, 99 a half of them were, you know, nothing like what you see onthe site today. And so the first time that after maybe a few weeks of justgoing back and forth on all of these, like, you know, it's always one of themore challenging things as a marketer, like, you know, giving good feedback onhighly subjective creative elements. But really that first time when, youknow, the team came back and you know, showed us something that were like, ohwow, you know, that's it, like that's the string we've gotta, we've gottapull on and it was something as simple as a early rendering of of what are,you know, new logo is, and just this one specific illustration that we alllooked at and we're like, you know, that's it, and then from there, youknow, that's like the string we tugged on and, you know, the team took off and,you know, everything after that was fun stuff and getting to to the site as itexists today. But you know, that first moment where it all clicked was waspretty magical, you know, launching it a couple of weeks ago is obviously youknow, super fun, but everyone knows that you're launching is always kind ofhold your breath for a second, you go, this is gonna be fun, Okay, here'swhere I want to start to wrap up the conversation with you. I want to talkabout how someone, you know, because it might not be a website redesign, right?But there's a lot of takeaways, probably a lot of lessons you learnedin a lot of lessons our listeners can take away from what you guys havewalked through when it comes to okay, we know our cure, right? And we want tomake it as simple as possible for people. What would you say that you'velearned through this process and what would you recommend to, to those thatare listening? Yeah, so um I actually, one of my fun kind of little side gigsis actually teach a marketing course for, for warehouse owners and you know,the very, very first thing that I I say whenever I give this this presentationis, you know, no one gives a crap about your company or your product and youknow, it's like that jarring thing, but you know, in my opinion, that's the,you know, first step that you've got to overcome and realize that no one isever going to care as much. No one is ever going to give you the time of daythat you expect and you know, no one is going to be as invested as you are. Andso you can't be building or designing or writing for for yourself, that thefirst barrier you have to overcome is how am I going to make someone justgive me a little bit of their time. So,...

...you know, what's my hook? How am Igoing to capture them? And I don't necessarily recommend just doing like atotal gimmick. Like, you know, you could go put some like, you know, likeobscene image out there and people might capture people's attention.That's not what you want. But you know, ultimately it's you know, number one,if you're trying to, you know, start out and build build a business, build abrand, you've got to ask yourself, okay, You know, what is my secret sauce? Youknow, what am I doing? And you know, it could be a number of things that couldbe design, it could be your website, it could be, you know, a video, you make,it could be your ad creative, it could be, you know, using great language, itcould be any number of things, but you've got to ask yourself All right.If I am not standing out. If I am not, you know, the most engaging thing thatmy audience has seen within their linkedin feed today. Like we're noteven gonna get to the point where someone's actually analyzing yoursolution, reading up and understanding what you're doing, and so first you'vegot to figure out, you know what that is for you and you know, this soundsvery harsh, but on an academic scale, you know, you could have like A levelmarketing and be level and sea level and the level and, you know, F. Level.But in reality it really is a case, there's really, in my mind, there'sonly A level in F level because, you know, you're that A level contentthat's, you know, the top 5% top 1% and stand out and you win, you're in the,you know, top 15% that's just not going to cut in from a purely academic scale.You can say, oh wow. You know, I gotta be, but in practice, you know, that'sno different than if you got in A. D. And so you got to figure out what thatpieces and then once you've figured that out, you know, in that moment oftime and that, you know, 30 seconds that you grab someone's attention, ifthey are not walking away from that experience with an understanding of,you know why they should care why they should give you more time, then youfailed. And so it's only when you're able to put these two pieces together,that, you know, there are people out there, there are websites out therethat I think are beautiful, they're marketing videos that I think areincredible from an engaging perspective, but you know, if someone gives you thetime of day and they engage with your stuff and they walk away and they'relike that was really cool, but like I don't know what the heck those folks do,you know you've lost, so when you can put those two things together and youget that easy to understand, impossible to ignore and so a very practicalexample, you land on the storage site and you're just hit with this massive,you know, we just put stored in huge letters overlooking the whole three Dcity and then the very first scroll we give you literally, you know, onesentence of text here is exactly what we do and so it's like we hook you andthen you can't get any further without having that understanding. And so mygoal was, you know, everyone who shows up should be wowed and no one shouldwalk away saying you know what the heck do do these guys do? And I think that,you know, as again, it's not, it's probably not a simcity world for forevery single person, but it's what am I...

...gonna do that makes me stand out from,you know, the 99% of, of other content out there and then once I've, you knowcaptivated interest, how do I make sure that that person that I've captivated,walks away with a real understanding of what I do and what problem myself Yeah,that's so good. I wrote down as we were talking just to lay out whether it'syour site or as you're thinking through your content, but how you would takesomeone through start to finish your cure and do it in a way, especiallywith language like pick somebody that's outside of your space a little bit andhave them look at it to like, do you understand what I'm saying here?Because a lot of times we talkin Burbage or we talk so niche specificthat it's, it's just completely gibberish. So to just be careful aboutour language that were and that we know what our cure is, right? But we're alsocommunicating our cure correctly to the people that are going to visit our siteor or view our content and remember ultimately like we're helping themsolve a problem that they have. So if they don't understand the cure, likethat's the end. So I love this conversation Mario, there's so muchmore we can dive into, but I'm taking a lot away from this. We're going to pushpeople in the show notes, you can click on the link and check out storagewebsite, check out the remodel Mario if people want to connect with you further,where can they do that? How could they reach out? Gosh! And so this is gonnabe my kind of subtracted points here, but I'm actually only social media,you're gonna find me on is is linkedin. I'm just Mario Paganini on, on linkedin.But you know, love to chat marketing and love to connect with folks. So findme there, connect, happy to chat more or you know, if you got any feedback onthe site or any questions, I would love to chat and we're also in the processof really building out the marketing team over at stores where were, youknow, looking to hire, you know, 10 to 15 people on the, on the team in thisupcoming year. So regardless product marketing, demand generation, content,brand design. We've got open roles across the board. So if you'reinterested there, store dot com slash careers and that page is pretty damncool too cool. Thank you Mario appreciate your time man. It was so funto get to talk to you. Yeah, likewise, thanks so much for having me lookingforward to uh listen to the recording and hopefully get some feedback fromthe listeners. Absolutely. For our listeners, You can also connect with me.Go on linkedin search, Benji Block, always talking about marketing businesslife and thanks for tuning in to be to be growth today. We'll be back soonwith another episode. Keep doing work that matters. Mm hmm For the longest time I was askingpeople to leave a review of B2B growth in Apple podcasts, but I realized thatwas kind of stupid because leaving a review is way harder than just leavinga simple rating. So I'm changing my tune a bit instead of asking you toleave a review, I'm just going to ask you to go to BBB Growth and Applepodcasts scroll down until you see the...

...ratings and reviews section and justtap the number of stars you want to give us no review necessary. Super easy.And I promise it will help us out a ton. If you want a copy of my book, contentbased networking, just shoot me a text after you leave the rating and I'llsend one your way, text me at 40749033 to 8.

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