Tips and Tricks to Rolling Out An Employee Advocacy Program on Social Media w/Sarah Goodall

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez talks with Sarah Goodall who is the CEO of Tribal Impact about her experience launching and maintaining successful employee advocacy programs.

You will learn:

  1. How to incentivize employees
  2. Common hurdles employers run into
  3. What the most successful companies are doing right
  4. How to find your first few employees to get started.

Yeah, yeah. Welcome back to BBB growth. I'm danSanchez with sweet fish media and today I'm here with Sarah Goodall. Who is theceo of tribal impact Sarah, welcome to the show. Thank you very much. Thankslovely to be here. So something we've been doing that Sweet fish media forprobably over a year now is what we call our sweet fish evangelist program.Right? But we're having employees out on linkedin all the time. We even help,we onboard them, we create content for them. We work with them individually aslike many influencers on social media and it's been great for sweet fish. Butsometimes, and most marketers know, it's kind of like when you gotsomething good going on, sometimes you want to see like, what else are otherpeople doing in this space? Are we getting everything we can out of this?Are we missing something? I was like, do we have some spinach stuck in ourteeth? Um, and that's when I bumped into Sarah on linkedin when she wastalking about how she does this with her, her clients And I was like, oh mygosh, I need to have Sarah on the show to tell not only me, but our listenerswhat she's doing with their clients, just to kind of compare notes and seewhat I can learn what we can learn from Sarah together as far as how to createuh, employee advocacy programs on social media probably not just limitedto linkedin. But though if you're a B two B company and listening to the show,Lincoln is probably a big thing for you. So Sarah I wanted to talk a little bitand kick it off with how did this even become like a thing for you to focus onyour whole, your whole company? Yeah, it's a good question actually and onreflection, it's quite an interesting way. I fell into it. I used to work fora global software company called ASAP and there I focused on their socialmedia channels so it's very much B two B and it happened about when was this?2000 and nine? 2000 and 10. So it was all kicking off and and I reallyremember quite distinctively walking into the office one day and going, youknow, I wonder what all these twitter stuff is, you know how it plays intobusiness. Ah That's just for celebrities and I'm like I don't thinkit is, I don't and and it kind of started there so I I fell into a rolewhere I was managing the social media channels and that's when I realizedthat actually whilst I was managing them for a mere I wasn't actuallyfollowing them because I was more interested in what my colleagues weresaying on social than what the brand was actually saying on social andthat's where I had my twig moment and I thought, hold on this has got legsactually if you put employee voices in front of the logo, that's when that'swhen a brand becomes comes to life and it becomes more authentic. And I justpursued that within S. A. P. And then I about 767 years ago I took voluntaryredundancy and started tribal to focus on it. So that's how I fell into this.That's amazing. So you were actually doing it for S. A. P. First gettingemployees involved. How early was that? So that would have been I would havestarted this in about 2012, something like that. So years and years ago. SoI've been on this right from the start...

...when advocacy wasn't even the thing,you know? So so yeah it was great and I love it because it touches employeesvoices, it helps employees and activate their own personalities on social mediaand it is for the benefit of the business and it's a topic that I love.So you know it's a bit of a win all around really. So absolutely 2012 man,that's early. I mean I was in social media, I was like one of the earlypeople are people like you get paid to work with the twitters right back in2010, right being one of those first social media people. Um but I I didn'teven get involved in helping employees become a voice until like way latermaybe. I mean pretty much until until I started working with Sweet fish. It wasvery much about the brand and honestly I was fairly unsuccessful. I was prettymuch successful with all the other digital marketing media and socialmedia was kind of like, why isn't this working? And then once I discoveredworking with people, I'm like, man, it's true, people like working peoplelike interacting with people more than they like interacting with brands. Notthat it's impossible to win there, I just couldn't get it to work. Butclearly, I think it's a, it's much easier to get involved when you'reworking directly with people. Well, I think to that point, sorry, socialismis a conversation, right? You talk with people, you talk to it, it's the sameon social media and people don't often talk to logos, they talk to the peoplebehind the logos and social media is no different forum community. It's wherethose conversations happen and the more eyes on is that you have on socialmedia as a brand, the better it is for the brand. So why wouldn't you do it?Yeah, I could think of like the half dozen times I've tweeted at a brand andit's usually to complain. Yeah, well exactly, West, why did you write thatwould be about it? You know, some brands though, they do have really goodpersonalities. There's a drinks brand here in the UK called innocentsmoothies and their twitter handle is hilarious, but it is a consumer brand,they can get away with cheeky tweets, you know, um and it has personality, sosome brands can get away from it, but when it's in B two B you've got to getyour experts in front of your Locos. So yeah, it just makes so much more sensefor me to be to activate the employees. And I think they're gonna be probablysomething there for the logos. But let's jump into the employees. One ofthe things that people have asked us like how how do you get this? How doyou get employees involved? We tell our employees all the time to be on social,but they rarely do. So I find that that's probably one of the biggesthurdles people have with getting, getting this thing started there. Likehow come none of my employees do it. We tell them all the time. So what do youdo when you're working with clients in order to incentivize employees or castvision or essentially how do you get them going? Yeah. So engaging employeesin an advocacy program is it is a very fine line, right? Your employees don'twant to be robots. They don't want to tweet out and share on linked in allthe same content that appears are sharing. It is it is very centeredaround culture. And I know this is...

...quite difficult, but you know,employees won't love your brand unless they love your culture and they loveworking for you. So a good first step is to take a look at that, right? Howhow engaged your employees and a this and a disengaged workforce is not goingto advocate for your brand. Right? So you got, it starts with culture now Ican't fix that. I'm not a culture specialist agency. That's not what I'mall about. Activating the employee voices that are ready to be activatedand there's the key right? So you can't you can't force people to do it. Youcan't put it in their Kpi is you know it's not it's not going to generate anauthentic engagement on social platforms. So I get a bit cringe whenpeople say oh that's all right we'll just put it into their goals. Don't doit, don't do it. Um I always say work with the ones that are ready. You knowyou take them in cohorts, this is like a cultural shift. It's a it's atransformation, you're not going to do one training webinar and everyone isconverted into social ambassadors overnight. Doesn't happen. So don't tryit. Take the ones that are ready to work with them, they'll inspire thenext generation to come through. And so it happens and give it two or threeyears suddenly you've transformed your culture and this this is how typicallyit works with large global customers. So okay so that makes a lot of sense.Start just look for the hand raisers. The people that are ready to go whatare you exactly saying and casting out to them for the hand raisers to evenrespond to. Well I think a lot of it is about if you invest in them, they'llwant to put in some effort. So when you explain to them, it's like we're goingto help, you were going to support, you were going to educate you, enable youtrain you, the company wants brand ambassadors, if you're willing to gofor it, we'll support you on your journey and those people will raisetheir hand, they say, yeah, okay, I'm curious, I'd like to know a bit more, Iwant to get my confidence, you invest in them and then the rest the rest willeventually follow, but in their own time, I think really appreciating theemployees, they move at different paces. They start from different places, youknow, you've got a quite a complex arena with different generations withinthe workforce, different understandings of social media, you layer that on topof each other. Suddenly you've got very complex environment, but on theincentives point the whole, you know, if you share five posts, you'll getsome amazon vouchers that doesn't work either. You know, it doesn't comfort.It comes from a place of click click click rather than I am I doing theright thing by my brand by their brand, by the company brand, you know, sodon't incentivize on clicks or engagements or you know, just juststeer clear of those short term embrace, you know, quick winds, those sort ofemployees that want to advocate for your brand, they're the sort that justget they love the quds? They loved the spotlight, they love more enablementand training and you know remember ASAP actually sorry, I'm just winding onabout this but remember S. A. P we found our community of top ambassadors.We invited them to our Sapphire now show and became employee reporters.They loved it. You know? So this is...

...this is the way to activate employeesand incentivize them. Not not ipads and amazon vouchers. So something we'vedone it. Sweet fish is first we kind of like lead from the front. So like weactually did it and the leadership team, like a number of leaders did it. I wasactive on it and then we kind of pitch to them like, hey, like this is foryour personal brand as and you get to take this with you. Yes, you can buildup a big following and then take that following with you. We're lookingforward to that. Like we want to do that. We would there would be nothinghappier for us than for you to build a following and leave because someoneoffers you a much better job somewhere else. That would be a huge success forus. I don't know, like so were we always emphasize like building theirpersonal brand? I don't know, do you emphasize for companies to like requestthat they advocate for the company a certain amount or you just kind ofleave that open ended right now, I'm just kind of like I don't even ask youleave it open? It's about their brand, it's about the employee voice. Do youknow what? There are a lot of leaders have trouble with that down, you knowbecause they feel a bit like why why would we train our employees to buildtheir brands so they leave and I'm like well they'll build their brand anywayand leave anyway, you're gonna have to embrace this and and deal with that andthis is where it's tied to culture, you know create a culture in an environmentwhere they don't want to leave and that's the key, yep. Absolutely. I meanif you're starting with a good base of like hey your employees actually likelike working there and they like you and the company then like this isactually more of an incentive to stay because how many other companies aregoing to invest in their personal brand? Hardly any. Right. Yeah. Yeah. Sosomething I've rested with yeah encouraging them to build their brandof which is connected to the employer brand. For sure. So yeah it's good. Imean if we're thinking we could just retain people forever. I think we'rekind of lying to ourselves, right? I mean even in let's just look atmarketing right? B. Two B. Marketing, that's what the that's what the show isabout marketers are like jumping every year and a half they do they do that'sjust that's just normal now, it is. So what are you thinking? You can hold onto them at least build them a platform, they're probably going to be morelikely to stay because nobody else is doing it right. So yeah, and I alwaysthink, you know, my role as the ceo is that you know, I I accept not people,people don't stick around forever, but as long as they leave, having learnedsomething and grown, I'd be happy, right? I've done my role and and it'sled them to greater things, super, you know, have a great day and enjoy itbecause I think that that's all you can ask right, is that you can help peoplegrow and learn. Um but if you go into the whole social advocacy experiencewith closed arms and building walls and we don't want people to leave, it's thewrong mindset from the start, it's definitely wrong. So, so you can havean idea of how we're getting started, we're finding the hand raisers, what doyou do for on boarding them? Do you just say have at it or do you like walkthem through a process as their training? How do you help your clientson board their employees? Yeah, there's...

...there are several things that you cando. I mean, one absolutely. First off is to understand risk. Okay, so youhave to sort of sheep dip them into understanding the mistakes that you canmake. The human errors, not to pick fights, the kind of content that youshouldn't be sharing? Even little things like location text? So whenyou're out and about traveling to customer sites and you're tweeting andit's tweeted with the location tag you potentially giving away competitiveinformation there. So just little things like that you're going to anevent, you take a picture of the room, take it from back of heads. There arelittle things that people don't necessarily understand how to behave onsocial. Some people don't want to be in a photo. So think about these thingswhen you share them. So I think first and foremost is not to frighten themoff, but to really educate them about the risks on social, but equally theopportunities that social presents and that's the reason they're on thisprogram. Now, it often depends whether they're using a tool or not. There'slots of advocacy tools out there that help curate content to save employeestime. That's a whole separate topic because that can, you know, quite oftenthe wrong content in there, but then educating them and onboarding them intothat. But for me, there are three key things that an employee needs to getright pretty soon profile. So how do they look right? Has their social hastheir digital footprint on platforms like linkedin for B two B. It's thenumber one twitter even instagram's popping up as it could be to beplatform? What's your profile look like? next one? Networking. Are youconnecting with people that, you know, have you got a networking habit? Areyou just accepting requests? He's sending requests? How do you look formutual connections? All that kind of good stuff. And then the third one isabsolutely content and it's not just about sharing and spamming out contentis about engaging with your network conversations a two way, so he needs toput as much effort into engaging with others as you do with sharing withothers and getting that content mix right? Because what, what we find ispeople at this stage, they will tend to to share their own company content andthen it doesn't want to see that they want to see the human behind theprofile. So you need to mix it up. So what's your content strategy, what yourpassions, what do you believe in that needs to be mixed up? You need to showthe human side. So they are the three things that I would we take through anonboarding process for employees. Hey, everybody Logan with sweet fish here.If you've been listening to the show for a while, you know, we're bigproponents of putting out original organic content on linkedin. But onething that's always been a struggle for a team like ours is to easily track thereach of that linkedin content. That's why I was really excited when I heardabout Shield the other day from a connection on, you guessed it linked insince our team started using shield. I've loved how it's led us easily trackand analyze the performance of Arlington content without having tomanually log it ourselves. It automatically creates reports andgenerate some dashboards that are incredibly useful to see things likewhat contents been performing the best and what days of the week are wegetting the most engagement and our average views per post. I highlysuggest you guys check out this tool if...

...you're putting out content on linked inand if you're not, you should be, it's been a game changer for us. If you goto shield app dot Ai and check out the 10 day free trial, you can even use ourpromo code B two B growth to get a 25% discount. Again, that's shield app dotAi. And that promo code is B the number to be growth. All one word. All right,let's get back to the show. Do you emphasize building like when you'recoming up with content for an employee? Do you emphasize building it aroundwhatever their they want to be about or do you try to italian the company to it?Like how do you coach the employee through what their content should beabout? Yeah, that's that's a great question. So, understanding what theemployee is about is paramount because at the end of the day they're linked inprofile is their individual profile. So getting them to understand who they are,why they do what they do, what they are interested in. Quite a lot of employeesdon't even have time to think about that. They've never thought about it.So, it's quite a sticky point. But then connecting their personal brand to thecompany brand in a way, and a lot of employees have never explored thisbefore, so they don't really understand. It's like, why do I do the job that Ido? What excites me about this job? Why am I working with this company? Andthen when you start to get them to connect the dots between the personalbrand and the company brand, that's where the magic happens, Right? So, andthis is the bit that often is missing when it comes to advocacy, because alot of B to B companies, like, there's our advocacy platform go share. Andthen suddenly you've got 500 employees all sharing the same story on the sameday, and it's cringeworthy. I just don't want to see it. So, building itfrom a place of their personal brand is key. And then connecting it to thecompany brand good. I'm glad we're lying there werecurrently doing. You figured like, if you run a legal services company, like,the chance that you're gonna be talking about things related to legal isprobably pretty high. Like, that's kind of what your whole companies about yourhiring people related to it. But naturally you're going to have maybesome marketers that don't want to talk about legal services because they'reabout marketing, maybe they have a little bit of background in legal sothey might work it in there, they might talk about some of the legalities ofmarketing, but generally they're going to be talking about the funnel, they'regonna be talking about acquisition, they're gonna be talking aboutpromotion and another broad marketing topics and that's okay. That's a bit ofa bugbear of mine done actually because I'm connected to a lot of marketers,I'm a marketing person myself. And when I see marketers sharing, I don't knowtechnical content about IOT in the cloud and how quantum computing becausethey happen to work with a company that might be in that technical space, it'slike your network is marketers please share with me stuff that I can learnfrom. You know, as someone in your network, that's what I'm looking for.Please don't share content that you think your brand wants you to sharebecause you need your on a tick sheet and you have to and it's irrelevant.You push your network off, you know, and as a personal brand, you've got tothink about that because the worst case,...

I mean first cases they'll an followyou. Worst case, they'll disconnect from you and you'll never win thesepeople back again into your network. So think about your content strategy is mymessage. So some of the things I've heard said especially on the trainingpart is around like just walking them through some of the pitfalls of doingsocial media for business because I I noticed that's probably unless you'rein marketing and you've kind of been in social media marketing, like doingsocial media for business is kind of a new thing. Um I used to work in acollege where I was walking students through and I was like, oh my gosh,like you have no idea like how to do just because you're a gen z and youknow how to do social media does not mean you know anything about marketingon social media, you think, you know because you've seen it, you don't, itis very different, but you kind of like you have a whole course laid out tolike help people like walk through that. Yeah, I feel like maybe Ramin is I workin a marketing company so most people are pretty familiar with this already,but in a lot of companies that's just not the case, it's not done, it's notin fact, we recently did some research on this actually and we it was veryobvious that those that are just coming into the workforce and those that aretowards the end of their career have the least understanding around socialmedia risk. They have a habit or behavior that understands how socialplatforms are, but within a business context that knowledge is quite isquite missing, not for everyone. I'm sort of broad brushing here, but noteveryone, but somebody once said to me that, you know, common sense for one isnot common sense for another. Um, and you do need to teach people where thelines are, where the limits are, when to pick fights, when not to pick fightswinter. Well, just generally don't pick fights what topics to get involved inwhat not to, you know, this is the business language of social media, verydifferent to your latest Tiktok video or you Snapchat. So it's um, yeah, it'snot the same. So brands have a responsibility to educate theiremployees around what best practices in my is my belief. So I've noticed you'veemphasised multiple times like educating on risks, which is funny is,I'm like, I don't think I educate risk on risk at all. And I probably need tobecause there probably are some like, hey, like don't do this if you do likethat's gonna reflect really poorly on sweet fish. So far. We haven't had anyproblems that maybe it's just because we have been doing it long enough and Idon't have enough people doing it eventually will run into issues Most ofthe time. I'm training people on like get them out of their head as far aswhat they think they need to post and think like, know what can you post,that's the most helpful to who you're talking to get out of yourself becauseyou can post something that's safe. That just like false flat, Right? It'sabout your dog. You're like, great, are you talking to dog lovers? Oh no,you're talking to I. T. Technicians. Okay great. Don't post about your dog.I mean every once in a while it's okay to post like something personal. Youknow, if that's like a big part of your life and you just want to share yourpassion for it fine. But that's like a...

...consistent posts. Yeah, don't do that.Like figure out like what what should you be talking about that would getthat would be helpful. That key term for me is usually helpful. Like whatcan you post to be helpful to others. Yeah. I find if I emphasize that maybeI eliminate some of the failures because you're thinking of them ratherthan you. But at the same time I think the failure is a good point because youcan definitely fall into that way too. Well, a lot of people learn from theirmistakes as well. But another good example of that is if you're in a salesrole and account management role and you're sharing on linked in somehilarious memes around you know, sales techniques and you know, whatever thereand there are some funny ones out there some great cartoons. But if youraudience if you're connecting with your customers are linked in. Do they wantto see that? Is that it does that present the right professional imagethat you want to use to grow your business and grow your organization andgrow your relationships. So just think just walk in the shoes of your audienceand really have a think about it. So I think you have an advantage of havinglots of clients who are doing this thing. I know a few companies that aredoing this, some are doing remarkably well. I mean, we think we all know likeum we know gong we know refined labs, they're big into getting employeesactive on on linkedin, Right? But outside of that, like what do you findyour clients that are the best that are actually doing really well? What arethey doing remarkably well. That maybe goes unseen on linkedin? They encouragecommunity internally, they shine a light on their experts, they raise themup, they use them as good examples to inspire others. Leaders act areactively engaging in conversations their employees are having on socialmedia. I mean, I remember at S. A. P. When Bill McDermott who was the Ceo atthe time, he engaged with one of my posts on linkedin. Honestly, I was themost popular person for about half an hour where, you know, but it showedtrue leadership, where leaders are listening, they're watching, they'reengaging, but they're actively encouraging their employees to be outthere. That that is where I see best practices, you know, where the wholeorganization is behind this and they don't have silos. You know, they've gotsocial selling over here. They've got employee advocacy over there. They'vegot leadership activation over there, where I see best practices wheresomeone's basically got their arms around the whole thing. Um, thereincluding influence or activation in that and they're joining the dotsbetween the programs and otherwise you, you get duplicate effort, you getduplicate time wasted. You have multiple systems implemented. It's awaste of money. So organizations that lead social at the top and have aholistic perspective around how to join everything together. That's bestpractice. Okay, so there's two things I want to dive into their, what I'msaying to just as a mental reminder to myself to come back to the second one.But the first one is you said, connecting the dots, like what doesthat mean connecting the dots? Like we...

...all know, we have a marketing mix goingon, we have lots of different marketing activities. What does it mean toconnect the dots with what your employees are doing versus maybe whatelse you have going on. Yeah. Your employees have a huge role to play inyour marketing mix. Right? So when I'm looking at a social portfolio, you'vegot your sales teams out on social during the role. Social selling thingwith linked in, you've got influence or activation happening with your expertsand your leaders engaging external influences. Uh, you'll have advocacyprograms, which is a tool that your employees are using to share contentand add their perspective on. You've got your managing and publishing toyour own brand channels, right? So you've got your, your brand channelsthat you're doing on social media, social listening, where does that fitinto the mix Now, if you get social listening and using those insights tofeed into your experts to create great content that you then engage yourinfluences to be part of that content that you then put into your advocacytool that then gets that out to the wider employee community that one oftheir employees has just created some amazing content. They will share it,they're more likely to share that and something maybe marketing is createdand then that gets it out to the sales teams that then can in mail it out totargets prospects and that's joining the dots and all of this. Activating awhole social infrastructure, generates him bound into, into your website toconversion. It helps create conversations that convert in my view.So that's, that's the joining the dots. That makes a lot of sense. So it'sreally connecting it to a larger social media strategy, connecting gonna beinterested to see like what it looks like to get your, your employeesinvolved in what you're doing on the influencer side. Um, certainly yourcorporate brand, right then you're mentioning the corporate brand and thecorporate brand, whoever is running that account is commenting on theiremployees account, they're commenting on that account, you know, creating alittle ecosystem, but maybe even pulling your employees intorelationships, your formal relationships you're building withinfluencers like, hey, just someone you might want to follow, we're working alot with them. So you know, comment on their posts. Hopefully they comment onyours. Like let's build a relationship with this person, that's more than justthe official person, representative from your marketing team. Let's pullthem into the fold with all of us. Right, Is that kind of what you'rethinking? Absolutely. And employees can generate content as well, you know,encourage your employees that are more mature in their social media journey tostart creating their own content, start creating the podcast, start writingcontent, doing videos, you know, you can get them involved in the wholemarketing process. Um, don't use employees is just a channel to amplifyready made content. They can be part of the content process and the influenceof process. So The 2nd 1 was getting leaders involved and essentiallyenabling and engaging with the employees as you said it, I was like,yes, that is something we're doing, that. I don't think we even realizedthat we're doing that probably ends up...

...being a big thing. Like I'm highlyincentivized to like as someone who's like spearheading this program to goand engage with as many employees as I can one because every comment onlinkedin boost their posts. So it gets in front of more people, but it's alsoencouraging for them. So I'm always trying to highlight them and take theirbest post or if I see them post something that's just awesome, I'lltake a screenshot and text it to them and be like this post is amazing, youknow, so trying to just fan fan the flame so that it becomes more of a fire,right? At least those are some of the ways I had in my mind as soon as yousaid it, that I'm like, oh, like that's that's probably a big part of theevangelist program that we have that I don't think we've even talked aboutthat probably is a big part. I'd be curious to hear like what other leadersare doing in order to really help employees, like better engage. Yeah, Imean simply as a leader just commenting on employee posts and congratulatingthem or, and I think that's a lot. It's a big part of the leader's role onsocial media is to engage the employee community publicly openly transparentlyand to really show their stakeholder community that leaders are engaged inthe conversation. They're not out there just sharing content. They're out,they're engaging with their own employees. It sends a huge message ofconfidence to employees when, when leaders participate in theirconversations, it is quite uplifting and lastly, how do you measure theresults of all of this? I know we have our own metrics, but I'm curious to seelike what, what other metrics are being measured by others out there. How doyou know, uh, like an employee advocacy program is, is strong. This comes backto, I think joining the dots a little bit more so metrics, you know, yourtypical metrics like your clicks, your impressions, your, you know, yourengagements. Yeah, monitor them. They're, they're interesting. You cansee trends and things like that. But I think the moment you start to measuresocial activation programs in the context of other metrics, that's whenit becomes valuable. So in the context of employer employee advocacy, forexample, some of our customers and this is fascinating really. But when youlook at the source of traffic to a website, for example, you can see thatemployees, they don't drive thousands of eyeballs to websites. They're not ahuge volume driver of traffic to websites. But when they do drivetraffic to websites, they become the highest converting source of traffic.So when you look at other sources like paid and organic social and employeestopped the charts when it comes to conversion. So looking at employeeadvocacy in the context of your website traffic, your inbound traffic and whathappens to that traffic, employees driven traffic doesn't drive volume,but it does drive high conversion. Um, and they're the sort of things socialselling slightly different. I mean when you look at your high performing socialsellers on linked in. When you look at things like the sec school. When youlook at your high performing social sellers, it's great looking at the secschool, lovely. It's another metric. But actually when you look in that inthe context of sales performance,...

...that's when it gets interesting. So youshould be looking at things like deal size, deal cycle time, overall,pipeline number of deals in the pipeline are your top social sellersgenerating the right kind of um, you know, in terms of performance, salesperformance, how is that correlating? That's when it gets interesting. Sothey're the sort of things I would measure. Um, yeah, keep an eye on theother metrics. But really the context measurements are key. It's interesting.So you're really looking at a lot of the metrics from across the socialenvironment to see a lift there as well as a traffic coming from the differentsocial sites that you're engaging in. Maybe it be linked in or instagram orwhatever it is. Absolutely. And start correlating, Start looking for patternsover time. Start looking at another thing I'd be looking at as well,especially if you've got an employee advocacy tool is looking at the contentyour employees want to share versus the content their audiences are engagingwith. And quite often you'll find that is very different. You know what anemployer wants to share versus what their networks are engaging with. Youtend to see 10 top 10 different posts. So this tells you a story about thekind of content that should be in the platform that maybe your employees liketo engage with. You need to keep an eye on that kind of stuff because thathelps you optimize the program. Something we do is measure just basedon amount of posts we actually every employee we have as officially a partof this. Um, they, they opt into the program for a quarter at a time. Wesigned them up for shield shield analytics, which is just linked inanalytics. It doesn't post, it's not employee advocacy. It's just analytics,but they have a team package that makes it easy for you for the whole team tokind of see how we're doing as a team and then how they're doing individually.It's kind of like an added bonus. Like, hey, you get to check out to see howwell your linkedin is doing. Um, but that way we can actually see likeacross the board who's contributing the most? Like how many posts are weactually doing a week? So that's kind of like the leading metric, right, ishow many posted you post? You don't have control over how many views theyget because you can't force people to be, you can't force linked and to serveit. But of course that becomes the lagging metric of views, comments andthen of course traffic and sales since you could just ask your new leadscoming in, like, oh, where'd you hear about us? And a lot will say linkedin.Yeah, I was looking at your post the other day about that actually about,you know, focusing on linkedin and how that's your number one platform, youknow, and that's what you do and it is for me to be absolutely, it's thenumber one platform. So, so if you focus on linkedin, linkedin is greatbecause you can get things like shield, but I don't like there's other greatplatforms. Like I think twitter twitter's, I feel like twitter ismaking a comeback. Really strong. Um, and I feel like there's probablyanalytics programs that measure it the same way shield measures linked in, butI haven't seen them out there. I'm sure there's like maybe Hoot suite does it?I don't know. But yeah, he's an hour wrestling with to get more involved intwitter, should we be Tiktok like, I don't know, get ahead of the curve onTiktok. I don't feel like me to be strong on Tiktok. Yeah, like I'mstarting to find it picking up, I'm starting to find more educationalcontent on there. So you never know. It...

...is, it's, it's a changing landscapedown and I think you're right about twister having a bit of a comeback. Ithad a bit of a lull a few years ago and people were just thinking this is not aplatform for me, but you know, I see, especially when employees reach, youknow, like a maturity level where they're ready to be activated hisinfluences and thought leaders and as an expert um they need to be on twitterbecause that's where the breaking news is happening, right? It's twitterbefore it hits mainstream news platform, so they need to understand how thatworks and influences are hanging out on twitter, especially B two B. So I dofeel that Twitter is a is a place that you need to be. So generally in B2B yougo kind of rhymes, so I'm a poet and I didn't know it. There you go, Sarah,thank you so much for joining me on GDP growth. Where can people learn morefrom you and find you online? Well you'll find me, I mean you can justgoogle me so if you just put Sarah Goodall in, I'm not the one that usedto work at Buckingham Palace alright, I'm the other one. So you'll you'llcheck out my profile photo, you'll find me on linkedin and you'll find me ontwitter and you'll also find all my baking and running pictures oninstagram. So so yeah just google me up and find me so fantastic again. Thankyou for joining me on GDP growth. Thanks so much dan, I really enjoyed it,cheers at sweet fish, we're on a mission tocreate the most helpful content on the internet for every job function andindustry on the planet for the B two B. Marketing industry, this show is howwe're executing on that mission. If you know a marketing leader that would bean awesome guest for this podcast, shoot me a text message. Don't call mebecause I don't answer unknown members, but text me at 4074 and I know 33 to 8.Just shoot me. Their name may be a link to their linkedin profile, and I'd loveto check them out to see if we can get them on the show. Thanks a lot. A little bit about.

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