B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 1724 · 3 months ago

7 Principles for Explosive Top-line Growth, with Jeff Swystun

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this replay episode, we talk to Jeff Swystun, Consulting Chief Marketing Officer at Swystun Communications.

Conversations from the front lines of marketing. This is be to be growth. Hey Friends, happy Friday, welcome to be to be growth. This is Ben j block and excited to share with you today a throwback or replay episode seven, principles for explosive top line growth, with Jeff Swiston, and he is the chief marketing officer at Swiston Communications. So before we get there, I have a fun announcement, which is that over the last month or so we've been running a survey. We want to hear from you. We want to continue to learn and improve this show make it as beneficial to our audience as possible. And so the survey went out, we got some answers and we were given away twenty five dollars to each person that participated, the first fifty participants, and then a special drawing for two hundred and fifty dollars, and I'm happy to say we drew a name, and Mike Jackson from ACI worldwide, director of field marketing over there. You have been chosen. So I'll be reaching out to Mike and we'll be giving away two hundred and fifty dollars to him for his participation in the survey. Just want to say thank you to everyone who gave us their feedback and it will shape the show moving forward. Fun things coming down the line. Hey, hope you're enjoying your summer. Hope you've been enjoying the conversations we've been featuring here on the show. As always, reach out to me over on Linkedin. Just Search Benjie Block. Would love to chat with you about marketing, business or anything going on in your life. Always a connector and I love talking with people about the show and just what they're seeing in the world. So, without further ado, let's jump into today's replay episode with Jeff Swiston. Seven principles for...

...explosive top line growth. Here we go. Welcome back to be to be growth. I am your host for today's episode. Nikki Ivy was sweet fish media. I've got with me today Jeff Swiston, who is agency weed and consulting Como for Swisten Communications, also author of the Book Why Marketing Works. Super excited to talk to you today, Jeff. How you doing? I'm doing great and happy to be here. Nicky. Thank you. Good stuff, liskle. You're getting some sunshine out where you are, as as am I here in Austin Texas, so that I was put a small on. must face this because we're going to talk about seven principles in in marketing that everyone to know some of the things that are covered in and Jeff's book, seven principles of explosive top line growth. But, Jeff, before we get into that, I'd love to hear just a little bit of background on yourself and what you and and special communications have been up to these days. You Bad. I actually started my career at Deloy in prey price water host as a marketing consultants and spend and sometime then on medicine avenue with interbrand. I was chief marketing officer there, who do over to DDB worldwide, which is, you know, one of the top AD agencies, and I was their chief communications officer. And for the last seven years I've been running Swiss and communications and actually that is focused on the intersection of brand and business strategy. And for your listeners, I'm primarily working in professional services, law firms, accounting firms, at agencies, consultancies. So lots of great beat of the experience that I hope to share as we talk good stuff. I didn't know that. I know that you are one of the you are a madman. Yeah, that's what my mom said to so one of the one of the first things that year and I had sort of discussed offline as a release to these the seven principles, is the fact that they're there are so many tools in tech, in in marketing, and probably more now than ever before. But how, you know, in the absence of solid fundamentals, that can...

...just turn into spending, throwing money away and and still being irrelevant. Talk a little bit to us, Jeff, about how folks avoid that. Yeah, you know, it's so we've got all this technown. You know, my industry is talking about artificial intelligence and what that will do, programmatic advertising, big data, a little little data, medium data, and, to tell you the truth, I think everyone's head is spinning with the stuff and there's a lot of promises out there now that, with the ability to measure at impact and all these things, that the tools are making us, I think, a bit lazy and there's an overabundance now communications and it's really tough to break through that clutter. We live in this world abroadcasting, but we're still really weak when it comes to engagement, persuasion, and selling, and that's because I think we are missing the fundamentals. I speak at business schools, they're not even teaching segmentation anymore. All that arts and craft stuff that goes into storytelling and positioning, I think is weaker today than it was fifteen years ago because we're just gravitating towards tech and thinking text going to solve everything. And it started with social media. Social media was just going to make, you know, selling anything fantastic, and now we know it's like white noise and facebook is bathed basically a birthday APP. And you know, everyone's confused. Yeah, for sure there's. There is one of been an obsession with what can we in terms of outreach, right or reach? What can we automate? And then half we measure it and then half we like see who is according to these you know mediums that you talked about, right, like facebook, see who's liking and clicking with it, and then imagining that that equals engagement. But you know, maybe it doesn't right and I think because the you know, all marketing to me a storytelling. So if you don't have compelling, evolving story, what are you actually communicating? What are people clicking and liking. You know, is it a you know, a sale sheet, a sale a product description? You know, those are things with a sales force, not the prospect. The prospect wants a story because as humans we communicate through stories and there's some great storytelling out there. But...

I think we're getting confused with the technology. That said, our fingertips now, for sure, for sure, and that's that's this next point of brand be tob brands particular really thinking about whether or not their marketing efforts are tactics versus actual strategy. And, like you talked about, these tools can sort of lend themselves to becoming just making even seeing what tactics we can leverage versus developing actual strategy that has to do with the humans that we're trying to reach. Talk a little bit about that. Yeah, definitely. I see so many be to be brands are definitely tactics in search of a strategy their marketing. You know, it's get me a facebook page will does that make sense? I don't know. Should we be looking at programmatic advertisement? Don't know, for the culture video on Linkedin and everyone's going to love us. You know, they make sense under themselves, but do they make sense as a coherent strategy. I always ask my clients three questions and they're not earth shattering, but they really start with the strategy. What do you have that's unique? Because, of course marketing is all about differentiators. So what do you truly have this unique who wants or needs it? And those are two very different questions, because wants and needs go to psychology and they're different drivers of how we react to things. And how do those people then, once we've identified them, how do they like to be engaged? And that last question is okay, what are the tactics to get to them? But the first two questions is, are the strategic ones, and there's three simple questions and the a hundred other questions roll out of them. But if you don't start there, then you are going to be just putting together a facebook page and hoping for the best, for sure. Right. So, so both have got it upside down. They are we're starting with the tactics and then maybe letting that build a strategy and just not being effective there. And I like what you talked about when you when you said this idea of being a want and in need. I saw something that you had some content that you had had put out that was talking about. That's where brands need to be right right at that that intersection of want and need. So I think that's really,...

...really important than I think that be the sea brands sort of caught on to that sort of thing a long time before beb brands have just now started to to catch up. And and that's one of the other things that you and I were talking about offline, this idea that, you know, beb brands can be as fun and as creative as BTC brands. But for so long, you know, the way that we approached solving the problem and betb was in this very technical way that was a little bit detached from the human aspect of it in a way that be thec kind of knocks out of the park. Talk to us about that little bit. Yeah, you know the Bab brands, historically, some do it really well, but in historically, and still a large measure of them just talk about sort of the tangible benefits and they don't get to the emotional benefits, they don't get to the higher order benefits of why someone wants to connect with them in any way. And it's so funny, and I witnessed this one I was on Madison Avenue. Most creative people on accounts would rather know work on a beer brand than Boeing. You know, they just thought that that was not sexy. It's UNFUN, because B Toc brands always allowed more creative freedom to do stuff. But I see be to be brands opening up to this now. And you said right at the top of our conversation about emotion, and that's something I cover in the book and it's something be to be brands professional services really need to focus in on is using a compelling story with emotion to compel people to get in touch. And I do that with with law firms. You know, they're so straightlaced and stiff, yet what they do is so humanistic because it's deals with people's lives in real, tangible ways. You know, you don't want to be a reverent and goofy and you know get a mascot for a law firm, but you can speak to people in a real emotional way and I see be to be brand starting to do that more. I really like what HP did with sprout. They put out a great video called hands. Sprout is this technology that allows you to it's like a machine that allows you...

...to put together amazing physical and digital, innovative, immersive experience and create your own videos. And they did this video called hands, and I can tell you it touches your heart and then you go wow, I would really like to have put my hands on that product, on that actual innovation and get to working with it. So they know that they can tap into emotion. Yeah, it's it's if I'm excited to see where BB brands take this. And was really cool about this concept is that it's applicable across discipline. So we are talking about it, you know, in the context of marketers, but I spend some time as a, you a stales person in Sass in the B tob space, and storytelling is going to be the thing that separates, you know, the average from from the great in that, you know, in that role as well. And so I think the more that marketing starts to do that and be to be the more that sales leadership starts to catch onto that and the more that across, like I said, the entire space, and not only is it going to, you know, bring more revenue to those organizations, but just think a lot of folks, and me to be are solving really important problems and if the goal is to to make everybody's lives better, then the better we tell these stories, the better we tap into this these people centered approach, the better it is for everybody's I love you talked about revenue there, because I another example I love was when the startup mailbox produced a video and mailbox was, you know, an APP that was about organizing your life online and it was simply showed a young woman out for a walk. There was no words, there was just some bouncy music, there was no words over the screen. That just showed her using the product. And then mailbox literally had no revenue. But that video is so compelling that they were bought by drop box for a hundred million because that was just been brought it to life. It said, well, you can organize your life and still have time for a twohour walk in the afternoon and wow, a hundred million dollar or purchase as a result. Yeah, I...

...mean it's like that. So I know folks listening are getting excited and probably like you know what, where can I begin? And you can talk about in your book these, these seven principles that be to be leaders need to leverage when they're building their brand, dig into those a little bit. For us, certainly as so. What I did is I, when writing this book, I went back about two three hundred years and looked at every cool marketing story I could. And you know, like everyone, we kind of get tired of talking about coke, McDonald's an apple. So I've got some really obscure ones in this book that I think people will enjoy reading. They'll probably tweg some old memories. But the seven principles, and the first one is huge for be to be brands, is position your offer as a solution and as soon as you do that it's about making people's lives easier, more rewarding, all of that stuff. It really crystallizes your story the minute you begin to package yourself as a solution. Next is tell it in the form of a story, because we've been speaking about that, that people naturally respond to stories. Insert emotion. We've already touched on this. So this is great and be tob can really learn to do this better and build relationships. I always see be tob is kind of like transactional one off. Okay, we got that, tick the box. Next, but you know, you really want people coming back for obvious reasons, and once you've got the court group of people coming back, build a community building. This is something be TOC brands do inherently and be to be brands still need to learn to do. Lastly, make sure there's an experience around this and that's how they commune. It keeps coming back and get away from that cold transactional nature that has been at the heart of be to be for too long. And then, finally, as we you know, every brand learns through trial and error. You've got to be authentic, open and honest or all of this falls apart. Right. Yah, know, so many of those are ones again that resonate with with me from my Austin obviously as a start up hub, right. So I've y spent sometimes some short stints, but we're started. It's like a dog years, right, it grows you. So a lot of...

...this stuff is just it's so, so powerful. So the building relationships. I think that was one of the things that I wish that I had felt in the be to be environment more free do as an individual contributor, as a salesperson, and I don't know what what the marketing teams experiences are with that as far as relationships, but I suspect the sort of that same struggle. Right. So much emphasis is on the acquisition, the procurement part of the funnel or part of the the customer journey, and then the relationship just supposed to sort of happen because they like the product so much, but there isn't a lot of effort put into the people aspect of building that relationship. And sort of the the story of my fall and gift back up and my own career has been this idea that relationships are revenue. So I love the fact that that's included in these in these principles, and then the fact that you talk about community as well. So those are obviously my favorites, but these are all good stuff. You guys, run out and get this book. The last thing that that I want to to have you touch on was this idea that marketing is an ongoing experiment and that there's going to be some trial and error. But you talk about this concept of smart failing and how to expect that and get ahead of it and use it to your Danny. Tell us about that. Yeah, I always say that, you know, blow up the lab when it comes to marketing. I have a lot of fun with it, try different things, and it's also, I'm going to steal from Dickens, marketing is also a furious plagiarism. So if you see something that's you know someone's doing well and it doesn't have to be in the same industry, don't graft on something that is in authentic to your brand. But give it a try, and that's why I write this. I talked about in the book, to that smart. Failing is to be expected if you can stay you have got the goal post in mind, blow the guard rails out a bit, try different things and have fun with it. That that mitigated risk is there for a reason. You know, the most celebrated cm own in the world right now as a fellow I've gotten to know online,...

...where I've never met, but he's the CMO of Burger King. He's just, you know, on hitting all the top list burger kings, knocking it out of the park, and it's because he's just trying different things every week and having a lot of fun with the brand. Yeah, no, I love that. I I'll have to go. And what's it? What's his name? I feel so having to ask you that. Fernando Machado, and if you can find him on instagram and twitter, please do because it's kind of fun. And he's promised me he's going to send me a burger king shirt. So I'm really looking I'm in it for the shirt. Yes, has the expertise, but the shirt. So this has been really great you've given us. So this is my dream for this show is always to have sort of this mix of actionable stuff and fun stories and passion, and there's such a passion for what you do and in the way that you speak about it. So I know folks are going to be really excited to follow along with you. But before we get to closing this thing out, now that I've extracted things from your brain, I am interested in what you're putting in it deepth tell us a little bit about what learning resource you have been engaging with recently that is, you know, getting you excited or informing your approach. Yeah, I've got to. One is a love flipboard. So I'm on flipboard. It's kind of my Goto in the morning and that flipboard, if you don't know what it's, nicely, I'm a look at it on my ipad. So it's nice and big and I've got subjects advertising, CMOS, branding, etc. And so I can flip through and see rough headlines of everything going on in my industry and then I can drill down and so I'll look like by nine o'clock my brains already full of, you know, interesting stuff. And given that I'm a Canadian, I'm going to hype a podcast and rush is a radio show on CBC radio and then they put it out as a podcast. It's called under the influence and by a fellow by the name of Tereeo Riley's and Old Toronto ad guy and he does a fantastic show. So under the influence is one I totally recommend and I think...

...you could find it in all podcast suppliers or CBC radio. And he's supposedly reading my book right now. So I'm looking forward to his review of by book. I like he said, supposedly. I'll be honest with you, I'm I'm not. As of late I'm not of pages between the fingers kind of girl. I tend to do more audio books, as You'R is your book available on Audiobook? No, I'd love to do that and I would love to be the orator myself, so we'll see. I think that's driven by book sales. So those people who do like books by it, and then Nikki might get her audiobook. Do you you with your Canadian accent, that the world needs that to be arrating this book. So I will. I will start a petition. I don't do what needs to be done. I've got a great face for radio. Last thing. I know books are going to want to know at how to catch up with you and follow along with the content that you put out. How can folks best connect with you? Jeff? Yeah, I'm everywhere, but if you want to go to my website, it's even got my phone number there and you can call me right up. So that's Swiston COMMUNICATIONSCOM and please get in touch. I love just to wrap around these topics. So you know the meters not always running. If you've got a problem, I love to hop on the phone or answer an email. So please, listeners, do reach out. Be Tob growth is brought to you by the team at sweet fish media. Here at sweet fish we produce podcast for some of the most innovative brands in the world and we help them turn those podcasts into Microvideos linkedin content blog posts and more. We're on a mission to produce every leader's favorite show. Want more information? Visit SWEETFISH MEDIACOM.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (1773)