B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2075 · 3 months ago

How to Package Your Ideas To Extend Their Reach

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez shares how you can package ideas to extend the reach of your thought leadership.

In the episode he covers:

  1. Why packaging ideas are important
  2. The 7 parts to packaging an idea
  3. What packaging ideas allows you to do

Welcome back to BBB growth. My name'sdan Sanchez. My friends call me dan Chevez and I'm here to talk to youabout how to package ideas for thought leadership because you might have someunique ideas and they might actually be extremely helpful to your audience, butgenerally you need to go a step farther to package them correctly in order toget them seen by more people to have them remembered more easily and forthem to go to work for others. Um in a more substantial way. The idea is notunique. It actually comes from Matt Church who I just had the privilege ofinterviewing a few days ago and we published it by the time you'relistening to this one and we talked a little bit about this idea of how topackage ideas he wrote about in his book called the Thought LeadersPractice, which you can actually get for free on his website Matt church dotcom. But after wrestling with it and kind of using it myself, I've come upwith my own way of approaching it, uh slightly simpler version of his way oftwo package ideas. And I wanted to revisit it here because I thought itwas such a powerful idea, like anybody could use this even if you're not quitean expert. Yet, even if you're not aspiring to be a thought leader, tokind of come up with unique ideas that are helpful and then packaging them notonly lens gives you more credibility as a professional or an expert, it's sucha great way to come up with ideas that can be turned into more content later.So even if you're a thought leadership practitioner or you're a contentmarketer who wants to better solidify the ideas of your subject matterexperts, you really should learn. And I would say master this idea is it's nota very complex idea. So I wanted to give you a super simple framework tostart doing this with your subject matter experts or with your own ideasif you hard the expert in your organization that's trying to createthought leadership content. But first like why is this important at all? Likewhy are we even talking about this? So...

...let me give you a few reasons why thisidea was so profound to me and why you should start practicing in yourorganization. One is ideas are abstract. They're not always easy to kind of likepinup. It's not as easy to say like a like a noun is right where it's aperson place or thing, a book, a cup of farm, right? Like it's easier to knowwhat they are because they have a physical state, right? So ideas areabstract, they're harder to remember. And if you're not careful, they can bea little bit too hard to pass along or to to be able to pass it on to somebody.Like how do you know you've properly passed it? How do you know your evenreferencing the same thing when you're talking about it? Right? The otherproblem is that most ideas are kind of half baked. They're kind of not thoughtall the way through. When people come up with them, they thought about how itmight apply to their situation, but haven't thought through all theimplications of it and put it together in such a way that forces them to thinkthrough how it might be interpreted, how it might be used or perceived byothers. So they're half baked and they're not all the way thought through.And that creates problems when you're trying to create useful ideas becauseif it can't be useful, right? Because it's only half baked, then that's aproblem for your thought leadership because the best ideas are the onesthat would be more likely to be used to be helpful to others and then justspread by word of mouth. So you're killing that if you only have halfbaked ideas and the way to know if they're half baked or find out ifthey're half baked is to walk through this process and you can shore it up bygoing through this process of packaging it. Another idea is that abstract ideascan be hard to remember, right? They're hard to pass off a long time ago, myfriend and I, when I was in elementary school, we started doing this thing andwe didn't really know what to call it. We would like go meet up at a park likeright our scooters or bikes to the nearest drugstore called Savon's insouthern southern sunny California and by like a can of coke and then go backto the park and drink our cokes. That was our thing. We called it the Savon'sthing and that was the name. But we had to, it was a, it was a thing that wehad come up with a habit, a routine and...

...it needed something more than just like,hey, like, remember that thing we did on saturday, Let's go do that again. So,we gave it a name, we just called it the Savants thing. It turned anabstract idea of this habit that we wanted to get into and just kind ofgave it a really, a really vague fourth grader name, right? It made somethingthat was abstract and turned it into an idea of that. We both understood, likewhen we say the Savon's thing, that means we're both gonna meet up the park,go to save on and come back to the park, right? So ideas are abstract and theyneed certain hook points. They need ways for people to remember what it is.So that when you say the thing, everybody knows what you're talkingabout, there's a very clear boundary line to it, so that's why you shouldpackage ideas. Now, let me give you the seven step process that I write intogoogle docs and then I just start filling it in from there. Once, I Ithink I have a unique idea and I've scribbled around some idea like tryingto frame it up and like my own like pen and paper journal. Then I get to agoogle doc and start filling out this exact seven point system in order topackage it and force myself to think through it fully And then I can usethat document to then turn it into lots of different things. But first let'stalk about the seven step process josh. What do you think is the mostirritating thing for B two B buyers right now, anne Logan, I love talkingto you about this. You know that the number one challenge right now is thatMany customer facing teams in the B2B space right now are forcing theirpotential buyers too, by the way that they want to sell, buyers don't want tobuy that way right now. They want to, by the way they want to buy. We need toenable those buyers, we call this buyer enablement at sales reach. We need toenable those buyers to make better decisions quicker in a comfortableenvironment that's more personalized for them to move forward with thatprocess. Dude, that's awesome. I couldn't agree more since I've beenusing sales reach in my own sales...

...process, It's allowed me to reallyenable the buyer to move more quickly in really two ways. One, they don'thave to download a bunch of attachments. I can send them to one page with theproposal case studies different resources because let's face it, theproposal is just one part of the sales conversation and probably only onesales enablement piece of content that you're sending. So it makes it easieron them. And then the other thing is, you know, we're selling to ourchampions and then we're making them have to re give our pitch to the entirebuying committee. So one thing I do is put a custom 2 to 3 minute video on thetop of my sales reach page that says, hey, here's all the resources, tie itback to the conversation. Here's the proposal. Let me know if you have anyquestions. And it allows me to give a little bit of kind of a mini pitch tothe rest of the buying committee, introduce myself, which helps me buildtrust and credibility and helps the buyer not have to repeat the entirepitch from scratch. So if anybody is looking to do the same thing in theirown sales process, I'd highly suggest they reach out to you and the team overat sales reach for anybody listening, just go to sales reach that I owe totalk to josh and the team first is you have to give it a name. Yes, you haveto name it. You have to name it. Well, right? You have to be able to referback to the idea and something that's short and concise, that's memorable.And all the rules of naming ideas are the same rules that you would do use toname a product or a company. Things like spelling, how it said, making sureit doesn't sound like something else that you don't want it to be related to.Like all those rules for naming it apply and coming up with good names ishard, but the better, more work and the better the name, the more likely theidea is to actually take root, the more likely the idea is to become a piecethat is useful to others because it's easy to remember and therefore it getsused. It's easy to hand off to people via word of mouth. So if you want yourthought leadership to be taken seriously, this is probably one of themost important steps is just give it a name. Right? When hubspot launch, theycame up with a name for their marketing...

...system, they called it inboundmarketing, inbound marketing is a name. And now when I say inbound marketing toyou, you have a very clear idea of what inbound marketing is. Right then. Theyjuxtapose it too. Outbound marketing, right? So it was, it was a, it was apositioning strategy as well as a naming strategy. But by giving it aname, they made the idea memorable. Easy to pass the idea around. Numbertwo is give it a short description, You need to be able to describe it in ashort and concise way. Like if someone's like, oh, what's that, youcan be able to just kind of rattle off a sentence or two about what it is,Maybe a few sentences and maybe maybe it has to be as long as a paragraph,but a few sentences Is preferable like 1-2 sentences to just describe the nameand short and then again, number three is just the long description and Iwould consider the long description to be a couple of paragraphs, but it couldbe as long as a blog post. If you're writing a whole book on it, that'sprobably too long. But obviously the best idea is probably deserve a book inand of themselves. But start with just writing a few paragraphs, flushing itout a little bit More. The 4th 1 is a story, not a story of how youdiscovered the idea, but a story of how the idea would be used. Oftentimes whencoming up using the, the agile development system for code, right. Webdevelopers often have to come up with a story to make sure like the feature,the thing they're building into their product actually makes sense. Likewhat's the user story behind this feature? What's the general problemthey have? That this solution then becomes help to and then the end result,the benefit of that feature, right? You kind of need to do the same thing withyour idea. Give us a little story of like the problem who was up againstwhat problem? And this idea helped in what way to achieve what end? Right. Alittle user story, even if it's made up and you make up fake names in a fakesituation, just to illustrate how this idea gets put to use. So, a short storyuh Number five is a visual. Oftentimes...

...you need a visual to help communicatesome ideas. Some ideas are like they don't exist without the visual. Likeyou think of Simon cynics golden circles or start with Y. Right? Youhave the three circles, the Y, the how and the what? Right? I believe if I gotthat right, But you can see the golden circles in your mind. Start with Y. Andyou have the three rings that he grew up in his famous ted talk, right? Itneeds a visual. And I think just sticking with the most simplest form ofthe visual is the most helpful. Specifically if you can keep it to adiagram that illustrates the concept those work best. It doesn't need to bea full blown infographic, which are just kind of like, I don't know justthey look like they're helpful but it's really just illustrating things thatare like even easier said with just words and numbers usually. So coming upwith the simple diagram that illustrates it is really helpfulbecause again, some people are visual and some people are Uh like they learnvia audio. Some people like to learn by a reading, right? So come up with thevisual for all those visual learners out there who like to learn that way.Uh number six is a metaphor. Is there a creative way? Can you pin it tosomething else? Can you use a simile or metaphor to help frame up this idea?Right? For a long time, many, many start ups were doing a pitch sayingthey were the Uber of X industry, right? That's a metaphor. They were using Uberas a way to position off a model that everybody else already understood inthe Silicon Valley. Like venture capital uh startup scene, right?Everybody understood how Uber works. They had the dual marketplace of peoplewanting cabs and cab and entrepreneurs who wanted to make money from givingpeople rides in their cars, right? You had those two customer bases and Uberwas the one bringing those people together. So a lot of people weresaying we are the Uber of veterinary medicine. I don't know, I don't know ifthere's an Uber of veterinary medicine, but when I said that you're like oh sothere's an app for me finding a...

...veterinarian, maybe they come to myhouse, maybe I can schedule a visit, but there's an app where I can find thebest veterinarian for me for my particular case. Right? As soon as Isaid that Uber veterinary medicine, you kind of have an idea of what that wasgoing to be like. That's the power of a metaphor. You're using one thing andcomparing it to another. And I think While this one is probably the one thatI'm willing to part with the most quickly of the seven steps, it's stillvery powerful to have a metaphor for your idea and the last one. Numberseven is evidence. This one's hard, right? Because a lotof ideas are good and could probably ring true, but you do have to build umsome kind of evidence for it. It can be in the form of some case studies thatcan be in this form of your experience over years and years of doing the thingthat you do. It could be in the form of research, surveys, experiments, Itcould be in the form of testimonials, right? There's lots of ways to showevidence for an idea, but you do have to have some. I often have a lot ofideas that are kind of in the idea stage and this is the last step to fillit out because I have a formed idea and the idea is a hypothesis. In fact, alot of the ideas that I'm sharing with you today here and over this coursehave been a hypothesis and I've shared with you that there a hypothesisbecause I don't have all the evidence in the world. I've I've read a lot andI've had lots of insights but I'm still sharing ideas and I'm testing ideas tomake sure they're good to make sure I have substantial evidence and it's okayto publish and talk about ideas before you have evidence to be fully confidentand truly defend it. But once you have you do want to have the goal of gettingevidence so you can add it to your idea to be able to back it up a little bitAt the same time. Don't wait too long to get so much evidence that it's 100%fact true. I mean, this is why higher ed gets behind and marketing right?Because by the time of marketing practices proven without a shadow ofdoubt through 50 plus research projects,...

...well, it's probably passe now and kindof doesn't work as well as it used to, right? And that's why higher Edcontinues to be behind the ball when it comes to marketing practices. Becauseby the time you can like validate beyond the shadow of a doubt that it'strue, it's kind of old. It's rusty. It actually doesn't work as well as itused to. So while I am a big fan of finding evidence to promote your ideasat the same time, sometimes thought leadership is on the edge and doesn'tisn't fully proved yet, right? That's kind of the kind of the trouble ofbeing a thought leader sometimes is that you're on the edge and don't haveall the proof yet, but you're usually getting the proof as you go and testingideas. Um, it's still good to have it. But again, don't wait until the veryend. Unless you're becoming a thought leader for academia, then you do kindof need to have all your ducks in a row there. All right. So those are theseven steps to packaging idea. I found it very useful. I'm now running all myideas through this and sometimes I package them and I'm like, oh, this isa great idea. And then I read about it in someone else's book on my crap. Ididn't come up with this idea. Um, like this one is really just the variationof matt churches idea, not my unique idea, but still I've tweaked it alittle bit. Make it helpful for me. I hope it's helpful for you. Once youstart creating a bunch of these ideas and you have all these documents withthese ideas in and it becomes so much more helpful for creating content, youcan literally pass this off to a content creator and they could come upwith content. So that's what I'm doing. I'm actually passing it off to mysocial media specialist who's going to turn some of these ideas into a numberof different short Lincoln post. I can pass it off to my blog to turn into alonger form blog post and I can even pass it to a book writer if I so desireto turn it into a book. Now while I am working on a book and turning a lot ofthese ideas into our playbook for Thought leadership here at Sweet FishMedia, um I'll probably be writing it myself and this becomes the next beststep to do so. So again, packaging your ideas, makes your ideas stand out andeasier to pass off and helps you not...

...just have a half baked idea forces youto think all the way through what this idea is, how it's useful and how it canbe communicated to the masses. Hopefully this episode was helpful. Ifit was let me know at Lincoln dot com slash digital marketing dan, pleasesend me a connection request then let me know. I'd love to talk to you. Um,and if this episode was helpful at all, please give us a fair rating on thepodcast player of your choice. Every podcast rating helps us get rankedhigher in the podcast taps and helps us get found by more and more people. Soif you could do anything for me, if this was any help for you, if you couldtap that star rating that you think we deserve, that would be fantastic. Thankyou. And Sweet Fish. We're on a mission tocreate the most helpful content on the internet for every job function andindustry on the planet for the B two B marketing industry. This show is howwe're executing on that mission. If you know a marketing leader, that would bean awesome guest for this podcast. Shoot me a text message. Don't call mebecause I don't answer unknown numbers. But text me At 4074 and I know three,Just shoot me. Their name may be a link to their linkedin profile and I'd loveto check them out to see if we can get them on the show. Thanks a lot.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (1602)