B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 1738 · 3 months ago

The High EQ Marketer: Every Marketer Needs Great Content, with Melissa Zehner

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this cross-over episode, we're sharing an episode from The High EQ Marketer. This show is produced by Sweet Fish Media.

What is the real value of great content? In this episode, John Busby is joined by Melissa Zehner to explore this question. She’s been a freelancer, copywriter, editor, and now Director of Content at Foundation. You'll learn:

  1. How brands should hire writers
  2. What makes a great writer for B2B Content
  3. How to build a content marketing strategy
  4. The notion of “Writing for Google”
  5. Best practices for your content

The High EQ Marketer website:

Conversations from the front lines of marketing. This is B two B growth. Hey, friends, welcome in today I'm thrilled to feature an episode from one of our clients and the show is called the High Eq marketer and John Busby, who is the host and his center field CMO. He's here with us. John, glad to have you on B two B growth. Benji, I'm glad to be here and I love that we're doing a crossover. You know, when I was, when I was a youth, TV shows typically did crossovers. The fresh prince of Bel Air would do a crossover with the Jeffersons. You know, George Clooney would show up on friends. So so I'm all about this and those are always the best episodes. So, listeners, you are in for a treat, because I just remember like that. You would always look forward to it, and that's I mean got you right. They got you at a crossover episodes. Okay, so John, you're here because before we go to the featured conversation, I wanted to get a quick like premise description and give some understanding to our listeners. So tell me a little bit about your your show, the High Eq marketer. I'm a CMO, I I'm always learning. I feel like I need to constantly hone and learn my craft and I feel like throughout the course of my career I've learned from talking to other marketers, not necessarily in my industry, and also talking to specialists, whether they're an S C O specialist or content marketing specialist or or branding specialist or come from an agency background, and so I wanted to have a podcast where I could learn from talking to experts across marketing. And it's called the High Eq marketer because there are these trends that I've been seeing really that have accelerated over the pandemic that I wanted to talk about. One is the importance of making in a sational connection that's inside your organization, with your marketing team outside the organization, to the folks that you're selling to. That's one. Second, I think that everything that you do in an organization comes down to marketing and is a representation of your brand. And then, third, I feel like marketing has become hyper specialized in all these different ways and I want to learn about those specializations in this podcast. So that's that's the premise and I'm really enjoying doing it so far. I appreciate the unique nature of wanting to look intentionally outside of just you could go. We wanna Talk Marketing in, you know, more B Two b space, but like looking intentionally outside of just that at other leaders and other industries. I think that it's always a great way to learn and and potentially pivot things that you're doing, uh, to try something new. I wonder, now that you've been doing this for a bit, what are some of the episodes that you really enjoy? Maybe upcoming episodes that people could get excited about? I've...

...had some really great episodes so far. I've talked to marketers and fields as diverse as restaurants and cloud software and subscription based coffee. It's round the gamut. But the ones coming up I am stoked for. I am interviewing the CO inventor of Siri in a couple of weeks and and he he's going to tell the story about marketing and creating Syria and also what it was like to work with Steve Jobs. He's got some personal stories there. That's gonna be really cool. And then the episode that's dropping next week. I'm not sure when this episode is going to come out is a conversation with the former chief marketing officer of Nike, and there's so many cool things about that episode, things that he learned from Lebron James, which is really cool, and then also that his path to CMO was non traditional. He started out at Nike as a design intern. So, uh, those two episodes I'm really pumped about. Well, that that gives some great context and I think I got to tune into the Nike episode because I got to say I'm not the biggest Lebron James Fan, but it's still intriguing and I love Nike and I was wearing wearing my nikes today. So all right, tell us what episode you chose to to bring to us today and maybe the why behind it. The episode that I chose today as a conversation I had with Melissa Zaner. She is the head of content for an agency called foundation, and so she was she and I have a really in depth conversation about content marketing, how to do it, how to hire writers, how to how to think about a content strategy and if you're in in B two B or you're really in any industry, how you communicate to your audience with contents one of the most important things that you can do. So that's why I chose that one. And she's an expert. So I think if you listen you learn a lot. Well, I appreciate you stopping by, John, and excited for this episode. Hey, if you're listening and you're interested in starting a podcast for your business, you can go to sweet fish media dot com and feel free. We have tons of free resources and then you can always reach out and and now it's time to jump into today's episode from the High Eq Marketer. John, thanks for being here and listeners enjoy. Thank you, Benji. Welcome to the high eq marketer. I'm John Buzzby. This show is about learning from the best and most interesting marketers in the world, which are, not a coincidence, highly emotionally intelligent. If you'd like inspiration, lessons, war stories, from startups or Fortuneies, that's why we're here. So let's go. Hi, Melissa, how are you? I'm well today. How are you, John? I'm doing I'm doing great. Um, so we're not here to talk about about voting, but in the coding world there's this holy...

...war around tabs versus spaces. I don't know if you've seen the episode in of Silicon Valley that really really makes fun of that. Um, in the editorial world, where do you stand on one space or two spaces between sentences, and are there any kind of editorial pet peeves or hills that you die on? It has to be one space after a period. I am probably in that camp. That is a hill I will die on. The two spaces after a period was something that was came about during the days when we were all using typewriters. Now that we have moved to a completely different machine, it's no longer necessary. So firmly in the one space after a period camp. And I'm going to add another hill that I will also die on, which is Oxford Comma or death. Okay, right on. Well, uh, I I didn't start learning to type on a typewriter, but but I will say that that whenever I started, I was either told to do to spaces or whatever, and I have a really hard time stopping, stopping, so I have to set up my my like a word auto correct thing to uh, to stop myself. Um, Melissa, you your your background, you you've done everything in terms of content. You've been a writer, editor. Now you're a leader, and I know we're going to get deep into content marketing strategies, but if you were to pick one adjective, I feel like a lot of my questions are going to be grammar related today. You could if if there's one adjective you would pick to describe the best content marketing strategies, what what would it be? And why deliberate? I think many organizations treat content as an afterthought. There's a go to market strategy, a really wrong paid program and oftentimes people create content and then say, okay, how do we fit this into what's already going on? Right, Um, and it's never going to generate the same level of quality results that it would if it was integrated from the beginning. So I think just starting there from the beginning and including content from the get go is going to naturally give you a much stronger strategy. Right, don't create it as an afterthought. Along the same lines, content strategy, just like any other marketing channel strategy, needs to directly align with and support the broader marketing organization's goals. Right. So I also think it's important to start there and reverse engineer content that's going to help you meet those goals. Versus, once again, just creating something and saying great, how do we fit this in? Where does it go? So that makes a lot of sense to me. What what are the are the building blocks of a content marketing strategy? Like, like,...

Um, you're you're meeting with a client for the first time. You're thinking about it for your own brand. You're going to execute a content marketing strategy. Like what? What kind of planning needs to be done in advance? If you if you kind of know what I mean? Yeah, first and foremost, audience research. Who are you talking to? What makes them tick? What gets them excited, what frustrates them? What problems can you solve for them? Understanding your audience and your ideal customer is always going to be key, right, because the whole point of content, if it's performing well, is getting that engagement, and you can engage someone if you don't know what they're all about, right. So that's always the first place to start. I think research is always really crucial. A lot of people aren't doing research. They're just spinning out content to check the box, right, taking the time to see what competitors are doing or not doing? What people are searching for, what they're complaining about is great. Um, that helps you figure out every piece of content that you need to be creating, whether it's a blog post and email, even a tweet. Right. That's how you really start getting people interested and having a conversation with you, versus you just sort of speaking to them. How that you talked about some some parts of the research where you're looking at what people are searching for Google and what competitors are doing. Do you think at all about trying to like create an emotional connection? And I think, I think we listen, we're gonna talk a lot about B two B content. Um, is it weird to think of that for a b two be audience like an emotional connection, because we're like here to talk business or you know what I mean? I know what you mean, and the answer is not at all. Even in B two B, we're still talking to people, right, a business is just a bunch of people with a common goal. It's still a person that is the decision maker. It's a person that is deciding to buy, click, subscribe, whatever that action is that they're taking, right. And so there's this misconception and B two B that everyone needs to be very professional and very stuffy and very conservative because we have this view in our heads that that's what the business world is like, and there are segments of the business world that are like that, sure, but we're all still people, right, and so being able to create an authentic human experience is going to take you much further with your content than anything that seems as professional as possible, right, Um, just like B two C, if you can engage people on an emotional level, you're going to have their attention. Yeah, I can see that, Um, is so I wanted to dive a little bit deeper into the notion of being stuffy. Like I really enjoy reading things that feel conversational to me. I mean Malcolm Gladwell, what he writes just like everything rolls off his...

...tongue or his pen like perfectly. It just just it just feels so right to read, at least at least to me. But sometimes I read, I read B Two b content and the tone and style is trying to Communic, communicate to me like on a on a personal conversational level, but doesn't really feel authentic. So, Um, how how do you think about that? That level of authenticity, tone, style, how does how does the brand figure that out. I think you have to start with your audience. We talked a little bit earlier about understanding them right. What makes them tick? What are they frustrated by? Where are they hanging out online? The other thing that's really easy to Glean from that research upfront is how they're talking, and if you can replicate that and talk to them in a way that they're comfortable with, then you're going to stand a better chance of creating engaging content or content that they're going to notice. Right. So if your audience is very casual, you probably need to be very casual. If your audience is short on time and very efficient and sending five word tweets and that's how they like to talk, that's how you should probably be talking as well. So you know, Um, I majored in in social science and school. So in social science they talk about this concept of mirroring, right. So that's how we oftentimes make other people more comfortable. You're watching someone else talk and you're nodding, you're saying, you're giving them that constant feedback, right. So you can take this concept of mirroring and apply it in content marketing and start mirroring your audience a little bit better so that they feel like your brand is a really good fit and they feel comfortable having a conversation with you. Yeah, okay, I like that. So so we've we've gotten to know our audience a little bit and we we have the background research and we've developed this tone, tone and style for for, let's say, a typical client of yours. May maybe there's no such thing as a typical client, but how do you break down the types of content, the types of content you need? Like, imagine you're in, Um, a kickoff meeting or brainstorm meeting with someone, someone new, a new client or or someone on your team that you're mentoring. What are the elements of a content marketing strategy at that point? It's going to vary based on what the rest of their marketing strategy looks like. Right. So, for a company that is very product led, the content may need to reflect that. So are we looking at features or solutions of the company offers that directly solve the problems that people are having? Right, Um, think of comparison pages on a website or a technical support page that would tell you exactly how to do something step by...

...step on a software as you're on boarding. So that's an option. Then you have companies that are very focused on being a lifestyle brand. Think something like Nike or Apple. Right, it becomes really integrated into almost every aspect of someone's life. So then you're going to be producing pieces of content that are much more focused on that emotional element, making someone feel like they're part of a community, making them feel like you get them. Right. Um, so I think again, it really depends on the larger strategy that's at play there and how content marketing fits into it. It integrates with it really well. So, unfortunately, like many things in marketing, the right answer is it depends. Yes, because right there's no one right answer for every client. You know, I built my career in content marketing and for a long time focus really heavily on organic, but I often times have saddened meetings with clients the past few years and listen to them talk and said, you know, I don't think that organic is a really good starting place for you. Right, I think you should start with email marketing or I think you should do some paid landing pages first and, you know, work your way into it. So if you're if you're being really thoughtful about your job, it's much more about what is a good fit for the client in that moment versus just sort of pushing a model that you're used to onto them. Right. Yeah, that that's true, Um. And you mentioned the term organic. So I wanna, I want to kind of Um, click into that a little bit. And you and I have have joked off camera about the concept of writing for Google. You know, Google is going to be the source of so much for any business and and there's almost like this this playbook, if you will, for how how you how you write in the hopes that Google will like what you say. But Google is a robot and you're writing. You know, you know what I mean. So, UM, Melissa, breakdown for me the how you should consider google as part of the equation of content marketing. That's a great question. I actually had to correct a writer this week who kept writing the phrase the Google Bot thinks, and I kept, I kept commenting on this document saying does the Google but think isn't thinking right now. But we we are so used to that, right, and especially in content marketing, there is this idea of somehow having to pray to the Google gods to get the results that you're looking for. Um, you can't overlook S E O. I think if you're going to be successful in content marketing from an organic standpoint, you absolutely still need to be following seo best practices. Um. In my opinion, the people that say just right, good content and it'll rank are being a little blase and possibly a little naive about it. At this point in time, there are people...

...publishing millions of new pieces of content. What, what is it every minute? Um, that's a lot of competition that's out there in the world, right. So you do have to be thoughtful about it. I don't how or think you should write first and foremost for Google. I oftentimes advise writers to think of it in terms of a check in process. So you want to be very well versed in how the algorithm works, the factors that Google uses to decide how it's going to rank a piece of content. Right, what good page experience looks like, and you want to have that in the back of your head as you're creating a piece of copy. Right. And there should be these moments in time where you stop and you do this little check in. Right. We know that Google likes keywords and subheads. We know that Google likes you to present information in a question and answer format. We know that Google likes you to break things up into bulleted lists or easier to digest information. We know that Google really likes it if you have multimedia that also corresponds with the topic you're talking about. So if you happen to have a short video that ties in, embed that in the in the post, right, but it's it should be something that really is just sort of there as an undertone in the back of your mind while you're creating a piece of content and periodically do that check in and if you can ask yourself, is what I'm doing right now hurting or helping? S C oh if you say no, it's probably helping, then you're going the right direction. Right. If you can ask yourself some of those questions and you know that you're not doing any of those things as you're crafting the piece, then no, it's probably not going to rank that well right. Yeah, I feel like Um like writing, writing that really draws you in and captivates you, is is a bit of a lost art. And and whereas in the old days I have I have that in quotes. In the old days, like Um like writing, in the use of words and and everything was maybe the most important skill in marketing. Now, Um, getting to be UH CMO or advancing and marketing. Some folks might look at at analytics or paid search experience or whatever. Um, I want to ask you about that. But let me actually want wind back for a second. How do you actually hire a writer? Because I feel like I when I see see good writing, I can I kind of know what it is, but I don't know if I know how to interview for it. That's a wonderful question. I hire writers very discerning Lee. First and foremost, I ask a lot of questions. Um, you really have to get past the portfolio and into the character of the person. So one of my favorite questions to ask is whether someone reads. In my experience a lot of aspiring writers spend a lot of time cranking out content, which is great. We all need a portfolio, we all need to practice the craft, but they're not actually reading Um, and so there are things you can learn by reading someone else's work that you're not going...

...to learn by just writing right. And it doesn't have to be an industry pub it doesn't even have to be a marketing book. I, having built a career in content. Oftentimes in reading poetry or a novel and the author has done something really clever and I have this moment where you step out of the story for a minute and say, Oh, I see what you did there. That was really genius, right. Or someone uses a really a really great turn of phrase that just captures a moment. You know. Um, I on a personal note, I love F Scott Fitzgerald because if you read the Great Gatsby, there are parts where he describes those summer days so well you can almost smell it. Right, Um, that that's the art, that's the craft of writing. So someone who's actively reading is typically going to be a better writer. I also look for a level of curiosity. Marketing is always changing, even if someone is just a copywriter. There are different clients, different in just trees. They're releasing different products. It's evolving and so, uh, research and learning is a really integral part of the writing process. It's always going to be that way. So if someone isn't curious and it doesn't naturally enjoy that learning process, they're probably not going to excel as a writer. Um, I think being able to detach from the work is very important. Writing in a professional setting is hard. You're signing up to get feedback all day every day, and there's writing for pleasure and writing for yourself and there's learning to write for your audience, which is not about you, right, and so you have to detach yourself from that process a little bit. And in a setting where you're writing for clients, you also have to write for them and what's going to help them meet their goals. So being able to remove the ego from that is going to produce a better result. Right. Um, maybe you don't like it, maybe it's not your personal style, but if it ties in perfectly with a client's brand and tone and voice and it's really on track to help them meet their goals, that's a successful piece of content. Right. That's what we would call a great piece of content. Um. Final thing I think I would say is someone who is well versed, or interested in being well versed in skills that are complementary or adjacent to copyrighting. So someone who is learning about S C o UX, reader, comprehension, branding, even if they're not actively having to write about these things, it's going to give them a stronger understanding of what high caliber content looks like. I love that answer. I have like a million follow ups. I was I was really wondering if you were going to use the term curiosity, because I feel like in in B two B in particular, like if you were going to write for for my company, center field, there's there's a certain level of understanding of digital marketing or or certain parts of technology. You kind of need to know that jargon and...

...how words are going are used in context about where the industry has come to really connect with, Um, with the the audience. And Yeah, it does make a lot of sense to me that someone who who would, even if they're not passionate about marketing technology, appreciate the process of learning something new and how to how to put it into words. Um, I wonder, uh, this question kind of just came to me, but I wonder how, as a as a writer, full time writer, you recharge or take breaks. I I know for me, whether I'm writing for myself or whether I'm I'm writing something for other folks at center field or whatever, I write for two hours, I am exhausted and uh, and maybe that's just me and how I use my brain, brain in other ways. But Um, as a writer, how do you keep things going day in and day out. It can be tough. I freelanced for quite a while before I got my first full time copyrighting job and because I was freelancing, it was very intermittent work right, which is easier to get through. And then suddenly I'm sitting in an agency and I've got forty hours plus of writing to get through every week, all day every day. And in that environment you don't have the luxury of having a writer's block and staring at that cursor for a while. You don't have the luxury of saying I'll walk the dog and I'll come back to it later. There are these really stringent timelines and you just have to get the work written right, Um, and you just have to squeeze it out. Where does it come from? Um, I'm not sure I have a complete answer for you, but I will say for me, I if I was feeling drained or burned out or like I was just tapped out and didn't have any more creative ideas, that's when I would try to shift gears and move into research mode for one UM. That's when you take a break right, start looking up stats and data, start reading up on this topic, so you can become more of a subject matter expert? Can you reach out to someone in the industry and schedule an interview and ask them a few questions? And sometimes that conversation will give you a lot of ideas? Right? So you're still doing the work, but you're giving your brain a chance to sort of process, right. I think that's why writing is so exhausting, because you're taking a specific topic and you're trying to distill it from every possible angle. Right, have I answered all of the right questions? Have I covered it in a way that makes sense? Am I also sounding really smart while I'm saying it? Because that's just a natural human concern, right, you know. And then you're also thinking about s e o and reader comprehension and all of these other things. You have a deep thought in the middle of it where you're wondering if your editor is going to hate that line or not. Right, and that's why it's so exhausting, is because your brain is on overdrive, and so sometimes I feel like you need to give your brain a little time to sort of pross us all of that and...

...catch up and make sense of it. Right, Um, think of it like sleeping like we go to bed every night and while we're doing that, that's when our brain organizes everything we learned that day and that's when it puts memories into different files. Right. Um, that's that's when it actually updates your memory, your muscle memory, about different skills. So it's kind of the same thing for a writer, like you're going to go through different phases and you're going to feel different ways. You cannot just be writing nonstop, forty hours a week. I don't know anyone who can successfully do it. There's naturally going to be an Evan flow. I will say, however, there's a caveat that I want to add in. There are a lot of people that complain that they're not successful in copyrighting, but they're the same people that say I had writer's block, I need an extension, I didn't hit the deadline, I just wasn't inspired by this topic. I've had writers tell me they didn't want work because they didn't think the topic was fun. If you're trying to build your career as a copywriter, you also have to treat it like a job, right, and you have to hit that deadline. Um, there was this quote that is really famous back in the day, also in quotations, someone asked Somerset mom how he managed to never get writer's block and he said I'm lucky the mews, the mew shows up every morning at nine am, because when you're being paid for it and your rent depends on it, right, it's a different level of inspiration and motivation. That's funny. Yeah, so, Melissa, your story is really, really interesting. Um, start, you mentioned starting as a freelancer. Now you're you're leading a team, you're leading a company effort Um. I'd love, I'd love for you to share your story, but then also ask answer the question or or or talk about what are the natural ways to advance as a writer, whether it's into other parts of marketing or becoming a marketing leader. One I think you have to know what's possible. I see a lot of conversation on social media these days and I have a lot of writers reach out to me who say it's impossible to be a six figure copywriter. You know, you see all these success gurus on Linkedin, you know, and and everyone thinks they're full of it, and I'm sure some of them are, I have no doubt, Um, but it is possible. I know several six figure copywriters who are doing just that and they haven't even advanced, at least title wise, at that marketing chain right. Um, they're excellent at what they do. I talked about that curiosity. So if you're a writer, and especially if you want to succeed in the marketing world, you need to have that understanding. That is going to help you not only succeed in the role that you're in, but in terms of being a member of a team, in supporting the rest of the department, in your interactions even with other team embers. So understanding s e o is always going to help the content rank, but it's also going to help you have an effective conversation with your seo manager right and get that guidance that you need. Understanding you x will help you know how to cap off in our ICAL maybe and suggest that someone...

...include a c t a right. Reader comprehension is crucial. There are a lot of people that are wonderful, wonderful writers, but they don't necessarily understand the elements of how reader comprehension keeps someone engaged in a piece and how that level of stickiness can help, especially in a digital environment. So Um, the I has a hard time reading uh Sarah Font versus a sand Sarah Font, anything that is actually too stark, black and white. The contrast exhaust the eye. Um, how many characters you have across and body copy? It shouldn't be more than seventy five if you're on desktop, most most websites are gonna have nine. These are little things that, if you understand and you can start weighing in on those conversations, are going to not only elevate how you're looking at the work but also how you're building relationships in the department. Right. Um, a lot of things that I learned were just because I was impatient. I was a copywriter. I was paid to sit in the corner righte copy, that's it, and sometimes I would go to a Dev and say, Hey, I've noticed X Y Z isn't working on this page. Can you fix it? And someone would say submit a ticket right. Eventually you don't want to do that. So I just started figuring out myself. Great, I'M gonna look up html and I'm gonna start standing up on wordpress and I'm going to learn how to do these friend and changes myself, and then I don't have to wait on Dev right. Um, it was the same thing with S C oh. I didn't start out learning S C O, but I was writing and no one was reading my stuff and I really wanted my stuff to get written, so I started learning s e o so that more people would actually find and read the content. Right. So I think this, this curiosity, is key, Um, and I think it will take you very, very far. I have sat in every position on a content marketing team. I was junior copywriter, than senior copywriter, than editor, than strategists, than manager, now director, right. Um. So it absolutely can be done. I want people to know that it's possible, but you have to have the curiosity and the drive to be really smart about it, the same way that you would any other career. Right, even a sales person doesn't just know sales. So if you're a copywriter, you can't just know copyrighting. You have to be really smart about all of these other things you can learn that can complement your skills and elevate the quality of the work that you're producing. Uh, that that's an amazing answer. and Um, the question I was going to ask, because sounding sounding really elementary right now, I was going to sort of break down content marketing into like these these metrics which which I had thought of as volume, distribution and conversion, and then, Um, you're giving me like these PhD level, number number of characters on a on a desktop screen, and I'm feeling like, I'm feeling like maybe I'm not knowing what some of the key metrics or KPI s are for Um, for content writing. Maybe you can break down to me how, how you how you approach looking at success, uh, for a content marketing execution? Well, there's always going to be...

...the qualitative and the quantitative, right, so I want to highlight that quality is always key there. You have to have that piece first and foremost, which means you need to have a successful strategy. You have to be really deliberate, deliberate about how you're approaching content. You need to have a talented copywriter. You probably need to have a talented designer as well, because we're creating for a digital environment. Right. You are going to think of all of those things as the ingredients that are going to help you produce a really wonderful piece of content. Right. That's just the starting point, though. Once you're done with that piece of content, how are you distributing it? How is it part of a larger marketing strategy? Is it fitting within a funnel or a buyer's journey that's going to get someone from point A to B to see until they're ready to buy? How does it fit into the larger picture? Right? So that's really important as well. The metrics are also really important and something that I think more people need to pay attention to, especially in content marketing. Metrics are everywhere in a lot of other marketing channels and it's amazing how many places start off really strong with a pay program and then start doing content marketing but tell you that they don't have tracking an attribution in place for their content marketing program. I've been hearing that for ten years. Right. You can set up tracking an attribution for organic just like you can for paid, and you can know exactly how much revenue it's bringing in. So I think that's really important if we're talking in terms again of content marketers that want to advance their careers, just like the pay team is doing. You need to be able to tie your work two leads in revenue, and when you can successfully do that you've proven your value. Right. So it's also really important to think about those logical next steps along the chain is well, so that you are the full package. Right. That's a successful piece of content. It's something that's quality, it's thoughtful, someone enjoys reading it, but also it's getting you the results that are really going to make a difference for your client or for your company. I don't know how articulate that was, very I circled around before I drove it home. You know so so, Melissa. Thanks, thank you. Thank you so much. My last question will be Um. If, if folks listening want to learn more about what foundation does or what you do, where should they go next? They can visit us at Foundation Inc DOT Co. Uh. Foundation also has a twitter handle which I believe is at Foundation Inc. I'll check on that later and double check. Our CEO, Ross, is also incredibly active on twitter and his twitter handle is the coolest cool which tells you they're what...

...you're getting into once you get him a follow. Um and we do share a lot about every aspect of content marketing, both qualitative and quantitative. Um and in my opinion we are doing some things that not any of the other content marketing agencies are doing out there. So I definitely encourage people to check it out. Thanks so much. Thank you. Center field delivers outcome based marketing solutions and customer experiences that convert to many of the world's largest brands in home services, insurance, e commerce, business to business and more simply stated, if you'd like to get more customers out of your digital marketing, we believe we're the best and we'd love to meet and show you what we can do. CHECK US OUT AT CENTER FIELD DOT COM. Slash podcast, and thanks for listening. You've been listening to the high eq marketer. Subscribe to US anywhere you listen to podcasts and if you enjoyed this episode, police drop US alike. Rate The show five stars. That's the I e Q thing to do. Thanks for listening. MHM.

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