B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2091 · 5 months ago

Kickstart Your Thought Leader Journey With the 30/30/30 Plan

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez shares his methodology for accelerating the process of becoming a thought leader through the 30/30/30 Plan. 

Essentially, ready 30 books, interview 30 experts, and write 30 blog posts to learn about the topic, build relationships, and begin building authority on a niche topic. 

Yeah, welcome back to be to be growth. I'mdan Sanchez with sweet fish Media and today I'm talking about how to kickstart your path to becoming a thought leader. And we've already talked aboutmany episodes that one you should never call yourself a thought leader, but toit's worth trying to become one because really a thought leader is someone whois an expert, contributing original ideas that has authority in order toadvance and industry in order to help a group of people, which is a good thingto do. Now. Of course there is a lot of credibility that's built with this andtherefore is very, I don't know, profitable, right? So a lot of peopletry to kind of misuse and manipulate this, practice this process in order toscam people and that's not what we want. We don't want to presume anything, sowe'll never call ourselves thought Leader. So if you never call yourself athought leader this, you won't have a problem with that because you're notgoing to try to use and abuse it. You're never going to call yourself anexpert a thought leader and authority. You're just going to put out helpfulideas that help people. But after reading multiple books on this topic, Ifound that no one really had a great game plan for how to become a thoughtleader, especially actually there are a lot of books and they're great. I willsay there's lots of books that will walk you through this. But I found thatthere was not a lot aimed at somebody who was kind of starting not from thebottom, but from just kind of like the baseline of being a professional in thetopic, which is where I found myself starting, right? It's probably whereyou're starting. If you're listening to this now, you're probably not a thoughtleader yet, but you want to be, you know, you have some of the goods, youknow, you have the ambition to become one and I'm telling you right now, thatthat is a good thing. Yes, that is not just pure selfish ambition to be agenuine and authentic thought leader. You have to want to help people andthat's what we're here to do, and that's what I'm here to help you within that process, no matter what industry you're in, no matter what yourspecialty is or what profession you're is, this will work in a lot ofdifferent situations. It will certainly work for marketers and BTB settings andit might help you as a marketer, help somebody else, Maybe a subject matterexpert, become a thought leader, even though technically right now they'rejust a subject matter expert. They don't have quite the authority today. Iwant to show you how to kick start it. Um, with something I'm calling the 3030 30 plan. And again, this is hypothesis. Like many of the ideas I'vepresented over the last month in this thought leadership series, um, issomething I've done myself. It's something I've worked on to some degreewith others. But this is just a hypothesis. By the time this isactually proven and well known, it might be different, it might be passedthe time this idea is useful, but still I thought I'd throw it out here foreverybody to hear. And I think once you hear it, I've tested this on linkedin.I've talked, I've talked to lots of people about it. It tends to hit home,it tends to resonate, it feels right, but I don't have any empirical evidence,but I wanted to tell you that to kind of like just be on the forefront. LikeI don't have like tons of research that validates that this is beyond, withouta shadow of a doubt the path to becoming a thought leader, but it'sworking for me so far and I think it'll work for you too. Oh, and in additionto this plan, I'm going to talk to you about how a podcast specifically,especially a personal podcast can help accelerate this whole thing andactually becomes like the tool that I think is probably the secret weapon ofthought leadership, my opinion. But First let's walk into the plan and thenas we go through each step of the plan, I'll tell you how I would accomplishthis with a podcast. So the plan, the 30, 30 30 plan is 30 bucks, 30interviews and 30 blog posts. This is what you need to do in order to kickstart your path to becoming a thought leader. Now, of course this isn't thisisn't going to like doing this plan isn't going to take you from aprofessional in your industry to expert...

...overnight. Like you can't just executethe plan in 90 days and then bam you're gonna be rolling in authority. No, butthis is going to get you way beyond where you're probably at now and somepeople, you know, some of you are further along than others in doing this.But I've done this three times now or parts, I've done this fully twice inparts of this a third time and I can tell you man, things start to reallychange for me every single time I do this and once I just did it evenrecently and it it started taking my my perception of others in a kind of adirection that I wasn't even trying to go in, but because I was executing thisplan, people started perceiving me as an expert and I would say, juststarting to perceive me like I was starting to get into the crowd of likepeople known for this topic and I'll talk more about that later. But let'sdive into the plan 1st 30 bucks. If you want to be a thought leader first, youhave to be an expert and you can't be an expert without knowing everythingthat's been read on this next topic. Now, hopefully you're already aprofessional, you're already well aware, you already have hands on experiencewith this thing you've been doing it for, I don't know, at least five years,like you, you went through college, you've been doing this for five years.If you didn't go through college, then generally they kind of like, say, Youknow, add another five years of experience to equal college or whatever.But you've been doing this for a while. You've already read books generally andbroadly on this topic. But to read 30 books is different to go into onesingle niche and read just about every book written on the topic. Now, ifthere's more than 30 books on the topic, then the niches too big go down lower.Like actually specialize in something that has 30 books or less. I'd saybetween 15 and 30 books should be about the mile marker. It's give and takebecause sometimes it's hard to define the lines of where a topic starts andstops, right? So I just say 30 books because you need to know what's beensaid, You need to know about all the ideas that have come before youotherwise, how do you know if you're contributing a unique idea, You don't,if you haven't read all the books on the topic, you have no idea if youridea is original. So starting with the 30 books on the topic is the best wayto go. This also helps in a few other ways and that um if you listen to myother podcasts about learning and the light, you can start going on socialmedia and sharing what you're reading, sharing your insights from it, sharingyour favorite passages from these books. Maybe doing a blog post with all thelike, like quotes from the books that you loved have all crossed all thebooks and people will start to kind of understand like, hey, hey, you're intothat thing. Uh Susie keeps posting about these things. She keeps readingbook after book and she keeps posting some of the best insights I've seen,right, great summaries of the books. She must be into this, right? You're sowing seeds to buildauthority later. Just by reading and talking about the books on social media.Now some of you are listening to me in like 30 books dan. I I hardly, I hardlyread five books throughout college. Like 30 books dan. That's a lot ofbooks. I'm not that big of a reader. Let me tell you, reading 30 books onone topic isn't as hard as you would think. Here's why when you have areally knits up niche subject, let's take let's give an example. I did thefirst time I did this was for nonprofit marketing. I was working for a nonprofit and I was trying to learn everything there ever had been writtenon the topic of nonprofit market. This is how I started to find that this wasa thing that this actually worked to build credibility and get me into thisspace. There was 16 books on this topic and I went and read them all andhonestly reading them all took way less time than I thought. I thought I wasgoing to be into the slog of reading 16 books. It actually probably took theamount of time of 15-6, sorry, it took even though was 16 books, it took aboutThe same amount of time to read six books. Because when you're reading all on onetopic, naturally, naturally, if it's...

...that niche, they cover the sameinformation over and over and over again and that's okay. This issomething PhD students have to learn to do is that they start reading a lot ofbooks. And then once they're, once they've picked their topic to writetheir dissertation on and do the research on. They've read all the books.So you have to learn how to fly through books faster by only looking andscanning for new information. Once you're on book two or three, like youstart to find that there's just some repetitive information. You know, howmany times I had to read about like social media marketing and thenonprofit space. And it just walked through the basics of setting up youraccount and thinking about who you're targeting and writing your first post.You know, many books covered that. I didn't have to read that again. I justkind of glanced at the page, knew what the content wasn't skipped. So I'mflipping towards the end, you're hardly reading every word. You're justscanning each page and here I am, flipping through each and every singlepage and scanning for new information. So you don't have to read every word ofevery book to have read every book on the topic because you have read at all,you're just not going to reread the same thing, but in different words. Andthat's kind of a shortcut that people don't really know about because mostpeople don't think to read every book on a single topic, it's easier than youthink just do it once you do it. The benefits of it our way are huge one.You just gain a sense of confidence knowing you've read every book on thetopic. It allows you to speak with a little bit more authority when you saylike, hey, my favorite thing about this or one thing I disagree with or likewhen you just writing about it and talking to people about it, you kind ofknow a lot more because you've, you know, confidently that you've readeverything out there From the main books. Everybody talks about all theway down to the obscure kindle books that has five reviews. Yeah, I readthose two again. Just pick a niche topic that has no more than 30 books onit. And your your father far enough down you might also add to that isextra credit research that's been done, top ranking blog posts, Listen to thetop podcasts in the industry. So it's like, it doesn't have to end with books.Obviously you can do a lot more highly recommend going to go into googlescholar and putting in your topic and looking for, you know, like a dozendifferent research reports. Those are really good to know if you want to bean expert on the topic and you have to know everything that's been before. Goand look at those things too. Now, what would be helpful with a podcast is justrecording what we are reading and then sharing your insights about the book.There's whole podcast just around book reviews and they're great podcastbecause you can learn a lot about from a book without having to read the wholebook in about a 30 minute or 10 to 30 minute podcast episode. You can do that.And the reason why I would recommend it is because it forces you to kind ofthink through what you've read, what you liked about the book, what youdidn't like about the book, kind of take some of your things you underlinedin it and share it with an audience. It just forces you to kind of chew on it alittle bit more and you get to make content with it in the process. Ifyou've listened to me, you know, I've reviewed multiple books on this podcastum in this series and in the past a. B. M. Series that I've done. Um and itcreates its great content because people want to know about great books.So I'm highlighting some of the best books I've read on topics here on thispodcast. So it's good content and it starts by recording and sharing thatcontent again kind of like posting to social media. It starts to build yourauthority on the topic after you do book after book after book. Now I don'trecommend doing this with all 30 books because some of the books are gonna becrap, let's be honest. But maybe the top five books record a podcast episodeon those. The second part is the 30 interviews. So part of the 30-30 planis to interview 30 experts in the field. Once you've read 30 books it's startingto become clear who those people are because some of them are the authors.Some of the authors reference other experts in the field. So as you'rereading, you can start making a list of all the people you want to talk to.This helps in multiple ways. One, once you've read all the content or haveread a lot of the content, not that you...

...have to like finish one section beforeyou move on to the next. Being able to talk to the experts takes yourknowledge to the next level. Because you could start to test yourunderstanding, you could start to ask the questions that weren't clear in thebooks. You could start to take some of your favorite ideas that you've readabout and ask the author about them and start digging deeper because believe me,every time an author writes a book, they're leaving like they're dueslicing and dicing and leaving things off the table. There's more toeverything they've shared. There's more stories, there's more research, there'smore history behind every single idea they presented in the book and apodcast. You can take some of your favorite things and pull them out ofthe experts if their authors and then find the people that you want to learnfrom that haven't written books, maybe they're just really active on social.Maybe they've done a lot of research, maybe they're a professor at auniversity, maybe they're a famous entrepreneur, a business person,whatever that person is, you can go and learn from them first hand andinterview them. This does something else other than just learning from themto increase what you know and understand and how you, in the grassthat you have on the subject matter, you build relationships if you want tobecome a thought leader in a space, you can't just like launch onto the scenewithout anybody knowing you. You have to build a network a little bit. And byinterviewing these experts, they start to get to know you. So whenthey see you or hear about you later, they'll be like, oh yeah, I've met I'vemet that person before. We did a podcast interview together. Huh? Theyjust published a book on it. Oh, I just saw their social media posts. Oh theyjust got mentioned in this journal, this this thing, they're going to knowyou and they can validate that. I don't know. It just it comes back around toyou and I can't say like all the ways that it will happen. There's not like adistinct way this will happen, but by having all these people know you andyour spending time with them. So there's a lot of them are going toremember you. It helps you build authority later and of course byinterview them. Hopefully you're recording it and you can publish thiscontent later on to again, begin building some of your own authority,not that you're putting out your own ideas yet, but by sharing all thethings that you're reading and all the people that you're talking to, peoplestart to get a sense that you're kind of into this thing and that you'relearning a lot and sharing really good ideas or others ideas at first, rightas you go, that you start to become a perceived expert because you're the onehanging out with all the experts and just by hanging out with them andposting the content that you've been talking to them about something startsto happen. It's something James Carberry talks about in his book calledcontent based networking. It's called he calls it the Oprah effect. You startto become perceived as an expert in that thing just through association,just by having your name next to their name and having conversations with themand then putting that out there in the public space association starts to takeplace and people start to some of the expertise of all the people you'reinterviewing starts to rub off on you. This is why we call it the Oprah effectbecause Oprah does this better than anybody else, right? There's a reasonwhy Oprah is so beloved by everybody because she meets with some of all thecoolest people on the planet, right? Interviews them, gets into their raw,vulnerable stories, uses empathy to like bring out the best, but she'stalking to the best people, right? So over time over interview afterinterview, after decade, after decade, Oprah is a powerhouse because she'staken association from lots of people. Not like stolen it from them, but someof it's rubbed off on her slowly over time and she's interviewed that manypeople so that can happen to you, especially when you really focus it inwhile she's really broad and it took her a long time to do that. If youfocus it in really tight to a very narrow subject, that will happen withyou much faster, especially if you're sharing it on social. Again, learningin the light along the way. Now, of course, this is obviously wherepodcasting shines the best because it's easy to jump on assume call push recordor if you want to upscale it a little...

...bit riverside dot FM is probably alittle bit higher recording quality. But either way it doesn't really matter.The point is getting on recording and then just pushing that recording outonto a podcast, you don't even have to be fancy about it, you can just publishit free to anchor intro, you don't even have to have an intro and outronecessarily. Um it's also a lot easier to get an audience with these expertsif you have a podcast and the podcast is named around their expertise thatusually the experts are some of the easiest people to get a hold of when itcomes to podcasting because they're trying to build a platform forthemselves to and by saying, hey could you come on my podcast, the likelihoodthat they're going to say yes is really high um I know because we do this forBTB growth all the time. Any time I want to meet with somebody, I'm like,hey, you want to be a guest on GDP Growth? Really? It's not because itmean usually it has to be something that you, the audience wants to hear.But A lot of times it's just because I want to learn from that person. I'mcurious about what they have to say about a certain topic and I just wantan audience with them. So I invite them to be on a guest on B2B growth and youcan do this even with a small podcast. I've done it with the small personalpodcast before. They hardly ever asked like how many downloads it gets. Um butthey're really popular. They might ask you how many downloads it gets, butgenerally most people never even ask most people say yes. And the 3rd part to the 30 30 30 planis 30 blog posts. There's something about writing about a topic that justforces you to think, right, This is why colleges and schools have you right? It's not because they want to read yourpapers. I know I've I've done a few, I've taught a few college classes andif there's anything worse than writing college papers, oh my goodness, it'sreading them, they're just horrible. Still the process is a helpful exerciseif you've written than, you know, right? Like writing about what you're learning,just forces you to think about the material as you learn how tocommunicate it to others. Um There's another benefit when it comes towriting blog posts and that you get to learn what people are actually askingabout. I would specifically write blog posts, not to just put them out thereon social, but to write to rank on google. So that when you're doingkeyword research, which is I'm writing ranking on google's can be asophisticated topic but I honestly just, I can't even have time to cover thisnow. Just google the word alphabet soup and then an article will explain how tofind the key words out of google search index itself um or Youtube video orsomething. But once you find the keywords that people are actuallyasking around the topic, you can start to get an understanding of like what,where the shortfalls are, like where people are confused about said topicbecause believe me, a lot of the experts write about things in academicjournals and then just trade publications about things that otherexperts are asking about. They're not asking about what people are askingabout or what your prospects are asking about or what the people you want tobecome perceived as an expert in on this topic, what questions they'reasking about. So go to google, find out what people are actually googlesearching for and write those blog posts, become an expert in the topicand the questions people are asking all the time. It's a good place to startbecause generally the things that are the most googled are the things thatbeginners asking. That's where we all go. When we have a question about a newtopic, we go straight to google. So answer their questions, become anexpert and the things that they're asking about And by the time you'veread 30 books and you've talked to 30 different experts on it, chances areyou can write those blog posts with ease. they're not easy to write, butthey're not that difficult either. Um The trick to writing for google to iswriting easy to consume yet exhaustive blog posts. Not long winded, it's notabout word count necessarily, but you want to write in depth content. Sousually it's going to be about a 1,202,000 word article to answer thetopic and you're aiming to make the most useful blog post on every singlequestion to rank for number one. That's the kind of blog post you want to write,you want to write the blog post that it's going to be the most helpful.Don't worry about back links, don't worry about all the technical stuff.Just write the article that you think...

...is way more Helpful than the top threeranking articles and you're well on your way. So That has a few benefits, right? one.It forces you to think to your learning what people are asking about, getting afeel for the topic and what the beginners are asking. And then threeagain you're creating content to begin publishing, to search, publishing tosocial, and you're starting to build authority because now you're not justtalking about what you're learning from others now, you're starting to put outyour own stuff. And um honestly, in some of these blog posts, you might addsome of your own two cents, right? And you should by now you've wrestled withthe material, you've had conversations about it. You're starting to think asyou right, and you're probably coming to some of your own conclusions. Again,hopefully you're a professional in the field already, and you're starting toput some of these ideas to use in the workplace. As you're going through thisprocess, you're actually getting your hands dirty and testing it and playingwith it as you're getting all these learnings from these books and theseexperts, and as you write about it, you're testing it out and you're goingto share some of those tests and some of those experiments you've done inyour day job in the blog post to make it more personal, making it morepersonable. But also just start sharing like, hey, I'm wrestling with us. Itried this and this expert recommended this. So I did this and this happened,that starts to build authority again. A podcast can make this easier. If youhate writing, you can actually shortcut the process through a podcast. Youstill have to do the keyword research. You still have to outline the blog post.But instead of writing it yourself, what you can do is jump on a podcast.Kind of like I am now, in fact, I'm going to do this with this, this verytopic. This very episode is that I'm talking about it and now I can takethis episode and hand it over to a writer that knows how to write blogposts and they can write it for me. I'm still, I'm still forced with having tocome up with the content. But if you're great at speaking and not at writing, Ilike doing both. I like writing my own blog post, but there's many blog poststhat I just didn't have enough time to write. So I handed it off to a writerafter recording a blog posts like this one and then they can write it. Thenthat blog post can rank and you can start to build authority because you'rethe one showing up on google when people are asking the questions. Andthat way you get two pieces of content with it, right? You get the audio andthe written one. So that's where a podcast can really help you kind ofagain speed up the process and build authority in multiple places. So thatis the 30 30 30 plan. Again, I've tried this three different times, one withnonprofit marketing and I really started to build up credibility there.It started picking up momentum much faster than I thought. I probably spentthree months on this and I launched a podcast. Um I started posting on socialand I uh I read all the books in a short amount of time and startedinterviewing experts on the topic and I remember just feeling the momentumgoing up and people kept showing up being like, wow dan. I mean I knew youwere a nonprofit marketer but I didn't know like I didn't know like you werethis deep into it, what they were trying to communicate to me over andover again. It's like wow dan. Like I'm perceiving you to be a bigger expert inthis than I thought as people would begin messaging me about it podcastlike experts that I was just asking questions to wood. Like after theinterview would be like, wow dan. I didn't know you were like, I didn'trealize how good you were at this, which is funny because I was onlyasking them questions and they were the one talking, they were the experts andthey were perceiving me to be the expert. That's just what starts tohappen. Especially when you start to do all these things together becauseyou're, you're dropping books, you're like, oh I like that idea. Rememberthis other author talked about that when you're starting to drop referenceslike that because you've been reading and researching everything, you startto sound knowledgeable and it's because you are and it's not that hard to gothrough this process. You can get this done. Yeah, I mean you can you can doit as faster, as short as you can just depends on how much time and effort youput into it. You can knock the 30 books out in about 30-90 days. You can knockthe 30 interviews out in one month. I'm doing it right now. Um it's a lot ofwork. Um You can do 30 blog post, probably takes the longest, but it'spossible to get it done in two months depending on how fast you write or howfast you can outsource it. So I've done...

...this again, I get it with nonprofitmarketing and I wrote I did the 30 books, I did the 30 interviews and Idid the 30 blog posts. And it started to take off really fast and I did it ina short amount of time, probably like all of it together, probably fourmonths. Um I did it again with account based marketing not long ago and I onlydid part of it. I read there was only 12, 13 books on the topic. So I readall of those over the course of the month and I did 30 interviews over thecourse of the month of this last february and I didn't write any blogposts on the topic. But already I was talking I was posting about it onlinkedin as I was reading books, doing podcasts on the books, doing podcastwith lots of experts. A lot of the biggest names in the topic on a. B. M.And I didn't have a lot of experience. In fact the whole premise I had forthat that deep dive was that I know I don't know anything about this. I'veonly read a book on it. I'm still new to B two B marketing. I don't knowwhat's going on. Please tell me what this means. But as I started posting iton linkedin, people are like started associating me with this topic. Again,the power of association happened. The influence and confidence that I hadfrom reading all the books in a short time period started to kick in in myinterviews and in the post that I was writing about account based marketing.So people are reading, people are listening. People are hearing meassociate with the names in the field. And naturally by the time the deep guywas over, people were starting to tag me and things being like, oh listen tothese people on A B. M. And I was throwing showing up in those lists. Iwas like oh my gosh, I wasn't even trying this time to like I didn't wantto be a perceived expert in a B. M. I'm still practicing it myself. I stillhave a lot to learn. I didn't have a baseline knowledge in it per se becauseI hadn't done a B. M. Before, but I was already starting to be perceived as aninfluencer in this space, as a leader in this space And it wasn't my thing atall. And now I've been kind of doing this with the topic of thoughtleadership, not because I'm a thought leader on thought leadership. Um that'skind of where I'm trying to headbutt again. I would never say it aboutmyself. I am still a student. I still have a ton to learn a whole reason whydid this 30 this deep dive right now is begin Again, doing everything I justtalked about in the 30, 30 30 plan. I was trying to eat my own dog food andit's working like people I'm showing up. Unless people are starting to talkabout it. All I'm doing is showing up and trying to be the most helpful in atopic that I think is important. That's it. So if this sounds interesting toyou, I highly recommend like start just search for the amazon books that youthink would be start making a list of all the books that you want to read by,five of them. Start reading them. Talk to others about what this might looklike for you. Bring some of your counsel in and see if what topic thismight be that you could focus and specialize in. It is a great path. It'sbeen working well for me. I have a few others that I'm working on it with theteam on. And again, it's just a hypothesis. So I'm feeling it workingwell for me, it's resonated with others. I talked to them about this plan, itdoesn't get you to expertise, but it is a fantastic way to accelerate thatprocess. So if you have any ideas about this or have any tweaks critiques aboutthis 30 30 30 plan um ideas or if this has inspired you, I'd love to hearabout it. Come find me on linkedin dot com slash science slash digitalmarketing dan. I love connecting with anybody from BBB growth and talkingabout how the podcast is. I don't know how how the podcast is sounding to you.Is it helpful? Is it not helpful? Is there something you would add to this?3030 pretty plan? I'd love to hear it because I'm still formulating this ideaand it's getting better and better with time and of course with your feedback.So let me know one of the things we've learned aboutpodcast audience growth is that word of mouth works. It works really, reallywell actually. So if you love this show, it would be awesome if you texted afriend to tell them about it. And if you send me a text with a screenshot ofthe text you sent to your friend meta, I know I'll send you a copy of my book,content based networking, how to instantly connect with anyone you wantto know. My cell phone number is 40749033 to 8. Happy next thing...

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