B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 1709 · 1 month ago

Keynote Video: A Better Way to Present Your Solution, with Maura Rivera

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Benji talks to Maura Rivera, CMO at Qualified.

As Qualified looks to shape their corporate narrative and paint a bigger picture of what they are bringing to market they have found one medium particularly useful, keynote videos. A 12-minute video, becomes a piece of pillar content informing the rest of their content strategy. Today we unlock how to use keynote videos in your marketing strategy.

For an example of the Qualified Keynote, click here.

Conversations from the front lines and marketing. This is be tob growth. Welcome back to BTB growth. I'm your host, Benjie Block, and today I am joined by more Rivera. She is the CMO at qualified more. Welcome in to the show. Thanks, Bengie, thanks for having me and pump to be here. It's going to be a great conversation here. I know from a high level more A. qualified is a newer company, still building brand, targeted account approach, but behind the scenes you guys have been working on really a bigger vision right bring in a bigger vision to the market, and you actually launched that about two weeks ago, and so we'll pick that apart a little bit and discuss it. I promise this isn't a big ad for for qualified here, but tell us a little bit about the big project in the work you guys have been doing. Yeah, so, thanks for asking. So qualified, where pipeline generation platform? We're really focused on helping bebb companies drive more pipeline. From your website we have kind of a core flagship product, which is a conversational product, and then over the last year we've started to roll out multiple products, multiple solutions, and so what we launched two weeks ago was a larger vision rather than us just being a conversational product. We now are painting this vision. And for the pipeline cloud, the thought behind it was that sales force kind of invented these cloud solutions. If your salesperson, you use sales cloud, if you're a service person, you use service cloud, and we thought to ourselves, what is the thing, the set of technologies and processes that a marketer uses to generate pipeline, and so we kind of pulled together all of our products and are starting to tell this larger story about the pipeline cloud, the new set of technologies and processes for bbcmos to generate pipeline, and it was an exciting launch for us...

...because it was bigger and more visionary than any other product launch we've kind of dead in the past. Hmm See. So what I believe is going to be valuable for our audience is just to hear some of the INS and outs of this project, because I think there were some helpful bits that we can all apply to our different context and obviously, specifically for be tob growth. This is for marketing people, but typically, if you're bringing a product to market. You're going to have your sort of marketing playbook. Here's what we do. We run these plays. This is a bit more unique than that, and so tell us a little bit of what maybe sets this project apart. Yeah, well, first off, I love a launch. It is a reason to kind of pull together your messaging. There is like a line in the sand and a date that you're going to tell people this story. It kind of helps you rally your marketing team around something, your company around something, and it gives your prospects and customers a reason to pay attention to you. So I think, especially as we were smaller and as we are growing, we always wanted to have big marketing. Launch is kind of on the calendar to show momentum, show show velocity. But one thing that I have been trying to do and our team has been trying to do over the last few years is be different when we do a launch. Of course we'll do a blog post well, as you a press release. Will have our social swarm, but one question we've been asking ourselves is, like what is our marky asset when we do a launch? And so over the last year we have kind of started this playbook that all kind of aligns around a keynote video, which is kind of the central asset for when we do a marketing launch. The keynote video came to be during Covid when events had gone out the window, but we were missing that moment where you could make a big announcement on stage, and our CEO kept asking me. He would send me links to apple keynotes, like you know, Jum Cook revealing the iphone or...

...the newest color, the newest I've had, whatever. Maybe he would send me links to Tim Cook's keynotes and Mark Bennyoff's dreamforce keynotes where he would get these huge product announcements on stage. And he kept saying, what is our version of the keynote? How do we bring something to market in this video format? And so over the last year we've kind of burtht this keynote concept, which is where we shoot it actually in a green screen, kind of in a big green screen studio, and we get our narrative really tight. We have different spokespeople come on stage, we have a mixture of slides behind us and product demos happening behind us and they arrange anywhere from like eight to twelve minutes and it is a forcing function for us to get kind of our whole message wrapped in a bow and delivered to people and kind of this video format. It's on demand. You can chop it up into a bunch of different assets. It is kind of the central piece that all launch things lead to, and so that's kind of become the the center piece of all of our launches going forward. And and we really stretched ourselves to do this pipeline cloud keynote that told this larger narrative about the world is changing and marketers need to keep up. And then we introduced our solution and we followed that with the demo and this really sleek video and that's become a new part of our go to market playbook when we have an announcement. There's a lot that I want to talk about with the keynote idea. I want to go back because you were asking a question at the front end, right. How can we stand out? What are we doing when we're doing these launches? Like, were you experimenting with different thoughts or because this keynote idea was thrown out during covid was like this is definitely what we're moving forward with. It's just an execution, like how we gonna do that? Walk me through how you went about answering that question of how are we going to stand out? Yeah, we knew we wanted something to be video first. So, to answer your question as about execution, video is is king. You look at all these...

...bedby companies now who have their version of apple plus. We have something called qualified plus where all of our videos live. We knew we wanted it to be a video, but we had a lot of questions about execution. Is it live? Is this something we drive registration for? Do we do it in a real event space or do we manufacture this like cool world that's modern and visionary? Do we do the demos live, which feels authentic, but that could make it hard? How do so? We had a lot of debate about how, what do we want to achieve, and we kind of then backed into how we produced it based on that. So we took a ton of inspiration, like I said, from apple and we were like, okay, we want this clean esthetic, we want a mixture of slidewear and demos behind us. Let's try it on demand first time or around, because we were nervous about live streaming it, just with like all of the production implications. Yeah, but then the on demand approach actually worked nicely because in today's world, like do people want to register and wait for an announcement? I don't know. So it's it's worked out nicely. We've done about five in the last year. We've shotten I think, five different studios. We have had different spokespeople from our company. We've had some that were just demo, some that had slideware as well, and we're constantly kind of iterating on the format. So it's even things down to when we go on site, like the size of the teleprompter, to how we use confidence monitors, to how we iterate on the script and collaborate on it. We've kind of been fine tuning the process. But that was a long way of saying we knew we wanted to do video. We didn't know exactly what it wanted, what we wanted it to look like and feel like, but we're kind of happy with where we've gotten over the last year after a lot of testing. Really, what I love about this and what you guys are iterating on, is how much it would have to clarify your message, because you have to when you're thinking about the scripting of it. When you're thinking of how we're going to do this in a video format. It raises the level of intensity from...

...like a Webinar or a typical demo, or it just all the components that we think of and be to be that we have to have right sort of as collateral. And this goes how do we add production value to them? And so there's a lot of angles that I'm sure people are curious on. This is why I like being a podcast hose, because I get to ask whatever follow up questions I want to ask and I get to just hear the INS and outs of this. But I wonder. You said you've done about five in the last year. You've mentioned literally iterating on prompt teleprompters and all sorts stuff, but talk to me a little bit about how it's differed project to project and some of the things you've learned now having done this a few times. Yeah, so where we start? I'll talk you through our latest one because I feel like that kind of reflects our learning along the way. The message is King. So where we starts? We actually started this one months ago just doing messaging sessions with our founders and with our executive team and testing the narrative, on them, getting their feedback on the narrative, understanding if the story all flowed well and really the the keynote started in a slide deck format where we put out the story, we think about the visuals that will aid them and then we back into the script. We've tried kind of the reverse order, but we feel like when we can see the final product in slide deck format that goes from big words on a slide, two big stats on a slide, two different product shots on a slide, that helps us make sure that the narrative is right, that the story is flowing well, and then we back into writing the script. We have different folks participate in this in this keynote. So like our CEO did the introduction, because he's laying out this narrative for a company at best comes from him. He likes to help write his own script, so it feels like him and it sounds like him. I delivered the product demo portion of it, so I kind of wrote my version of the script and then we would do hours and hours of dry runs before our shoot date where we would just make sure the story is tight and it's flowing really, really well, and then, in...

...parallel, we worked with our creative team. We work in an APP called Figma to create high fidelity visuals for the slides and for the product demo so that it all looks really seamless. The reason that a keynote is good is like a blog post, you could be Jejen the copy up until the day of a lot the keynote. There is a date on the calendar where you're shooting this video, where you're doing the live script reads, and so it's a forcing function for you to get your story really tight. We even, once we got our story tight, our visuals tight or script tight, we even do dry runs the day before, practicing our choreography. What's happening on the screen behind us, where are we pointing, so that when we get there for shoot date, we, like, are totally information. We know exactly how we're going to shoot it. We've even worked with different studio sizes, some that are bigger, some that are smaller. So we've started to use bigger studios so we have more room to walk around and really make the story come to life. But it's an interesting production because it's a mix of product marketing, design, collaboration with our founders, prepping our spokespeople so that they feel animated and confident when they get on stage. So it's a lot of moving parts and I feel like we're still perfect. We're still debating, like the demo component. How can we make it more interactive? We want to bring more customers into our keynotes so that they can have some customer validation. So we did a retrospective last week and we still have a lot of ideas. We question. Do we want to break out of the screen, screen world and go back to more practical environment? So I think we're continuing to like iterate, both from the process standpoint but also the production standpoint, like how we make these really showstopping videos. Hey, everybody, Olivia here. As a member of the sweet fish sales team. I wanted to take a second and share something that makes us insane mean more efficient. Our team uses lead Iq. So for those of you who are in sales or sales...

...ups, let me give you some context. You know how long gathering contact data can take so long, and with lead Iq, what once took us four hours to do now takes us just one. That is seventy five percent more efficient. We are so much quicker without bound prospecting and organizing our campaigns is so much easier than before. I suggest you guys check it out as well. You can find them at lead iqcom. That's L EA D iqcom. Already. Let's jump back into the show. So I think we're continuing to like iterate, both from the process standpoint but also the production standpoint, like how we make these really show stopping videos. Let's talk about the customer side of things for a second, because if this was done wrong, you could be very just selfserving in a video like this, where it's the same reason why people struggle to get Webinar sign up. So this could just become this glorified version of like why put a lot of money into a project that is showcasing your product? Great job, but you still have to get people to watch it in like want to interact with this thing. So I'm sure there's like a balance there. How do we make it engaging enough, entertaining enough, also add enough value to the customer in this that they're going to engage with this thing? It's going to be worth it right. So how have you thought about that in the creation process? Yeah, you have to get your money's worth out of video and investments, whether it's a keynote or a customer film. You know, it adds up. I used to be on the video team at sales force and we would do these beautiful customer story films. But you have to make sure they're used across your website, across your marketing assets and the sales cycle. So for us, what we do is we have this one kind of let's say it's a ten minute keynote, and then we chop it up into probably twelve different assets. We have an asset that is like sizzle videos for advertising. We haven't even shorter version that we use for Youtube ads to make sure if people are searching relevant content they...

...can see it. They're we have this site called qualified plus where the long version of the keynote lives. We have a shorter version that's just the demo on our product pages. So if I'm spending x amount of dollars on the video production, I at least know I'm getting usually ten to twelve assets out of it. One thing that's fun is we always do that. We call them sizzle videos, but like a three thousand to forty five second kind of Mashup like must know pieces of the keynote and that's what all of our employees push out on social the day of the launch. So your linkedin feed becomes like this sea of sizzle videos and they have captions underneath them and they're fun and they're snappy and they lead to the longer keynote. They make you want to watch them. But you have to make sure you're intentional about the cutdowns that you get. You have to make sure that there is a place in a space for all of your assets and then you have to weave them through every part of your launch. What are the outbound cadences and are your sales teams using them? What are the best things that they can use further on in the sale cycle, not just on launch date? So we try and be really intentional to make sure we're getting our money's worth out of these videos. And of course there are like ways we can measure that. You know, views on Youtube. We can see how long of the video people are watching and there's an overwhelming sense of gratitude from our employees that now they have these sleek assets to share with their prospects. That makes us look like really grown up and big and innovative and it it kind of just like takes our brand up a notch, which has been awesome. Definitely see how that can be a value add I think putting in all the if you're going to put in that much time on the front end to create an asset like this, the more that you can get out of it in repurposing and putting it other places. If that's a no brainer, it's just it's the extra work right. And I think when we had talked before, we were even talking about how this informs website copy, two emails, I mean content creation all over the place. Walk me through what that looks like kind of if you're looking...

...at the project you guys just did, you're having to plan not only like we're going to practice a dry run of the video itself, but how this is actually going to go to all these different places. Can you give a like behind the scenes a little bit on what that might look like in the weeks leading up to a launch? Yeah, so for us, like once the keynote narrative and look and feel from a design perspective is tight, the rest of the launch flows from that. How far in advance might that be? Well, if I were, if I were like a lucky woman, I would do everything like eight weeks further in advance than we wanted. We actually as Burgers. Time is never on our side. So for us, let's see, we did our launch mid April. We started building our narrative in December, January and testing it and we went hard into like keynote production planning, getting the slides built, this script built, the visuals built, I would say February first, right when we kicked off the fiscal year. So we really had I'd say eight or nine weeks of like intense launch planning, which was tight. If I were to do it over again, we'd have a little bit more time. And so the first four weeks was just focused on the keynote. How can we get that story tight? How can we get ready for production? And then everything that goes into a launch, blog posts, advertisements, we wrote an Ebook, we had new social assets. All of that stuff reflected the exact language, the exact look and feel of the keynote and all of our promotional assets drove back to the keynote as a way for our viewers to kind of understand the story and get excited about this pipeline, cloud vision. So what we put into the keynote then bled into everything else we did from a marketing standpoint and it was nice because it all hung together so nicely on launch date. Like the video looked and sounded like our email, looked and sounded like our blog post. We even readd our home page to match the narrative. We put new videos on qualified plus...

...everything hung together from the creation of that keynote. If ire to do it over again, I'd have two more months to do it all. But we pulled it off because we have like a really amazing team, product marketing team, content team, creative team, and it's fun to it pushes your creative muscles a little bit beyond the typical marketing playbook and I think to all of the marketers out there I would I think it's an interesting time to innovate on video. How do you use video as a centerpiece of your launch? How do you tell your story in a compelling way to your point? How do you tell the narrative that's like tied to your viewers problems and not just chest beating like a very youth centric video and solution? So it pushes us to make sure that, like, we're really tight with our narrative and the story we're telling. Hey be to be gross listeners. We want to hear from you. In fact, we will pay you for it. Just head over to be tob growth podcom and complete a short survey about the show to enter for a chance to win two hundred and fifty dollars plus. The first fifty participants will receive twenty five dollars as our way of saying thank you so much one more time. That's be tob growth podcom, letter B number two, letter be growth podcom. One entry per person must be an active listener of the show to enter. I look forward to hearing from you. To your point, how do you tell the narrative that's like tied to your viewers problems and not just chest beating like a very you centric video and solution? So it pushes us to make sure that, like, we're really tight with our narrative and the story we're telling. HMM, I've brought it up a couple times and I don't we don't need to go here too long, because I think our listeners are going to connect the dots of how this is way different than like, let's say, I mean any sort of Webinar or other you know, like the more traditional be to be video options, right, but...

...just give a compare and contrast to how you've the mega difference, I guess, you see in doing this strategy versus other marketing strategies you've been a part of, right, especially maybe in a video format, where the one that comes to my mind recurringly is the Webinar. But I don't know if there's some other things that come to your mind and how you've seen this be the specific benefit over those. Yeah, I think. I mean look at the last two years. How many virtual events have we all joined in? It's hard to pull them off. It's really hard to keep the viewer engaged. It's a lot to ask your viewer to commit an entire day to watching your content. So I think what we were looking at was the you know, covid era webinar where everybody is at home and there's slides on one side and faces on a screen on the other, and we looked at that and then we also looked at live streaming of events pre covid like. What was that ex experience that you felt like when you got to be the first person at dreamforce to see the unveiling of like the latest product, that there was excitement there. So, if I guess, on one end of the spectrum was kind of a blaw Webinar and on the other end of the spectrum was the live stream of a really incredible event. We wanted it to feel more like that live stream experience, but we wanted to condense it so that people could digest the content and then move on with their day jobs. We wanted to make it available on demand so people could watch it when it worked for them, and we wanted to uplevel the production so it felt like a beat to sea, like unveiling that apple like experience that is modern and sleek. And so really we were going against the Webinar for so many reasons and I think I think we delivered on that vision, but I still think there's more work to be done as well. Well, I can say you have definitely delivered on the vision. I went and watched some of these and I wouldn't like highlight this on it be to be growth episode if we were like on this...

...as a strategy or as a way of thinking. So I definitely I love that you said Short, on demand, highly produced to me that is what sets it apart. And when you're just thinking of it from a marketing standpoint, if you are going to leverage repurposing this content, what is your sales team going to want? What is your marketing team going to be able to use this? Is that like? It does have to be short enough that someone would digest it when you get sent a link, right, it has to be high quality enough that you can tell there was extreme intentionality and purpose put behind the thing. So I love that and I love that you can see room for improvement right with it. With anything, you're so in the weeds that you're going to be like, okay, there's a million new things we want to try and continue to innovate on. Okay. So I wonder now, being just a few weeks removed from this you're mentioning there's some other stuff you would want to try. What do you see as some of the next iterations? What are some of those things that you're looking to the future going? We would love to try fill in the black from a keynote perspective. Yeah, yes, two major things. We want to bring more customers into them, like whether there's a Qa with a customer, even having a customer deliver the product Demo just to give people great confidence that the product were pitching works. So how can we bring more customer speakers into our key notes and is there a way we can have a live element to the demo? But that's hotly debated for us. Like I said, we don't want to make people grab a number, a weight in line, but there is something really authentic about a live demo and, like you know, some videos have gotten so overproduced that you question, like what's real what's fake. So we're trying to just figure out how do we bring some of that authenticity live demo experience back into the keynotes. I would say customers and like continuing to iterate on the product demos just to make them feel really tangent. Bull are the...

...two big things that I'm excited about. Yeah, there's a long list, but those are the two things that I think I really want to tackle with our next keynote. Hmm, okay, let's go to talking about the Roi. You've seen from this it's one thing to create something that's just a great asset and you put on a bunch of stuff, but then you're obviously going to look at the return. What has that been for you? Can you share some of the results? Yeah, I mean video is this is the age old question, right. How do you prove how do you tie video production to pipeline generation and closed business? At past companies I've done customer marketing and we had customer films and we would have our sellers tell us when they feel like a customer video influenced to deal. So that helped US justify future investments. For us we look at success through a few different lenses. We look at like overall video Kepis, what's how many views did it get? How long was it watched for? We want people to watch seventy five percent or more of the video. That is a sign of success. We always want to get a couple thousand views within the first few weeks of it being unveiled. We also look through the Advertising Lens. So we spend money on Youtube. We look at this as like a brand awareness play, not a pipeline generation play, and we do short ads for people searching relevant content for us, for instance, or purpose built for sales force. So we try and serve our adds up to people who might be watching sales forces youtube channel, for instance. For us. We look at the average watch time of those videos. Did people hit skip at or did they keep watching it? And then, other than that, just to be honest, we don't tie dollar spent to pipeline generated and closed ACV yet, but I would love to build a way where we can look at pipeline influence from our videos. They watch this video, you know, before they became an opportunity, so that we can say these videos influenced pipe jen and close business. And I think...

...that would be somewhat easy for us to build in the sales force, but we just we haven't gotten there yet, but I think we'll get there really soon. It's nice to catch you in a place where that's sort of what you're thinking about. What maybe not fully quite there yet. There are lots of ways we could track right, but I think those initial first steps are that is like the entry right. We're gonna yeah, you track in the things that we could all kind of track and I like I like that as a starting place for for our listeners. Okay, so look back at this process for me in the lead up to the launch and if there's those that are going I love this idea of like highly produced video or they're in on a marketing team and they're thinking, man, there's some things behind this type of strategy that really could be impactful for us. Are there any pot holes that you would say we watch out for this, any sort of roadblocks that got in the way of like execute this creative idea that you're going hey, if you're going to go down this road, watch out for this. Totally. Yes. I think that we had an experience with one of our past keynotes that we were so focused on the look and feel of our demo assets we weren't as focused on once the slideware happening before we unveil the product demo. So we got on site and we were kind of doing our choreography and we were talking about what was happening in the world around us and we hadn't figured out what was happening on the slides behind us. We didn't know where to point or where to look. So I would say getting that slide deck type that is really the content of your keynote video well in advance so when you go to shoot it on site you feel intimately familiar with what's going on. I say behind you, because for us we have our talent walking in front of this huge sixteen nine screen that we've kind of superimposed. So that was a challenge. Finding a good production partner is always a challenge, we and it's expensive. So we've gotten lucky that we have a great production partner...

...and we've worked with them for every keynote. So we feel like there's a partnership there that we're working through the preproduction process, the day of process and the post production process and it's gotten smoother every time because we're working with the same partner every single time. Preproduction is about getting things tight on site. It's about making sure that your speakers feel really comfortable and well rehearsed, and then post production it's about having in open communication with your production bender. We use VIMEO for leaving comments. We do tight turnarounds for days of feedback. We use a sauna with a really tight work back schedule to make sure we get everything on time and slowly but surely, I feel like the process has gotten tighter and smoother time over time, but not without errors for sure, and just tons of rehearsal time for the speakers to make sure they feel good to go. Love this as just a creative episode and as one that I know our listeners are listening to, going, Oh, I see how this supplies in my context and different things we could try or innovation. This one thing I love about these episodes right is we want to help people fuel their growth and their innovation in their marketing and I like this as just an idea. And so, man more, thank you for jumping on here and and chatting with us today. There's a lot more roads we could go down with this, but I think this is a great starting place for so many of us if people want to connect with you and what you guys are doing. Talk a little bit about the work that you do and where people can connect. Yeah, so check us out, qualifiedcom. Our product is a conversational product, so you can chat right with our sales reps the moment you arrive on the site. That's kind of our that's our offering. And then, in addition, check a connect with me on Linkedin, Maura McCormick Rivera, if you have any questions. I'm such a strong believer in video. I'm always really excited to hear what other be tob companies are doing from a content creation standpoint to stay and out and be different. Kind of push the envelope.

So shoot me a message and I'd love, love to connect. And thank you, Benja, for having me. It's fun to take a look back post launch at like kind of the creative process, because I think as a marketers that's what keeps us going and what is the exciting part about our job. So it's fun to talk about it little bit. It is. Yeah, thanks for sharing that and I'm sure there will be listeners that will want to connect with you over on Linkedin, so we encourage people to do that. You can connect with me as well over on Linkedin. Always talk about marketing, business in life, and would love to hear from you and maybe one of your learnings from this episode. Specifically, if you've yet to follow the show, go ahead and do that on whatever podcast platform you're listening to this on. Keep doing work that matters. Will be back real soon with another episode and one more. Thank you, Tomura, for being on today's episode.

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