Decide & Go, 90 Days to Launch! With Kristy Krueger & Dave Keepper

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Benji Block has a conversation with Kristy Krueger, VP of Marketing at Icario, and Dave Keepper, Creative Partner at Human Ideas. Together we tackle how deadlines can build momentum within your team, and the advantages of a decide and go approach.

Connect with Kristy:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristykrueger/

Connect with Dave:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/davekeepper/

Mhm. Yeah. Hello and welcome in To be to be growth, I'm your host. Benji Block B two B growth host here at Sweet Fish Media. And today I'm joined by some new friends, Kristi Krueger and Dave Pepper. Guys, welcome in to be to be growth. Thank you. Great to be here. So I'm glad to have you guys both here. I would love for each of you to just take a second. Christie, let's start with you. Explain where you work and kind of what you do. Sure. So, um, I lead the marketing team at a cario. We help health plans to get their members to do things that are good for them. So I think of like going to your doctor for an office visit or getting your flu shot or more serious things, like, you know, if we know a condition that you might have, making sure you're getting into the right program or doing the right things to stay healthy. Awesome. And Dave, what about you? I am a founder and creative director at Human Ideas, where a virtual ad agency that helps companies like, uh, Cario and Christie do everything from branding to making explanation type videos to writing scripts to I'm Her Man Friday. I guess we do what needs to get done. I love that. And I'm excited to get to talk to you guys at the same time, because you're each going to have such unique vantage points on a process that you just walked through. And what we're gonna talk about today is really hitting fast forward on the branding process. I've been so impressed to hear parts of Christie and Dave's story and how they handled some really tight timelines to pull off all that's needed from a branding perspective. When a merger happens and really a new brand is born from scratch. What typically would take six months? They did in three. So Christie paint for us. Just a picture of the task at hand. What were you tasked with? And then how did Dave become an asset in a key player in this process? Sure, So it basically was to...

...companies coming together. Um, Novo and Rebel were in the same space do the same thing, and so it made a lot of sense for us to come together and offer more to the market and So the task at hand was, you know, we don't want to stay. Revel, and we don't want to stay. No, but we want to come up with a brand new brand so that people you know have some inspiration around us. They see this and they think they have all positive thoughts coming in. So we really have this challenge then, of Okay, what should that be? And where do we start? And how do we make it even better than the brands that we were before? Uh, and do that in 90 days. So not only are you joining teams together that have never worked together before that actually were competitors and saying, Okay, you're on the same marketing team now let's let's create this brand where you know it unites us and creates this momentum that we are doing something great for the market. And how do we package that up in a way that people will understand it and be, you know, excited by it and have it be inspiring? Three months? We're going to do that in 90 days. Like why? Why is it 90 days like that's That's a very short term for a lot of the things that that would involve, like a new website, a new name that has to go through legal new teams coming together, new collateral. You know, everything is new, which is exciting and fun, but in 90 days, that quite the challenge. So in that circumstance, you have to make sure you have the right partners and people who are brave and ready to just, like, jump in and make this happen and have a similar approach to the work. And so that's why Dave is on this call because he was my first person to reach out to a human ideas. I've worked with him in the past, and I don't remember what the first Call was, but I remember the reaction to 90 days. Do you remember Dave? I don't think I I think I used proper English. I don't think there was too much too much surprised. Yeah, it was definitely an accelerate accelerated timeline. Oftentimes, agencies, I'm going to say two things about agencies. I came. I came up...

...through the advertising agency world, and I think agencies sometimes are capable of moving faster than clients, and that's simply because the clients their thing right, and you have to prove something in your It's easier for us to name to throw names at you. Then you just say, Yes, that's the name forever. I'm going to, you know, And then you have layers and different people who who may or not be influencing that decision, who may or may not be in the meeting. So my first question was, Are we going to get access to the decision makers? And Christy assured me of that. And so right away I was like that put me at ease. And then there's an efficiency that I have found post advertising agency life, that we are deciding to go kind of team as, well, big. So we've all been in. Let's let's be honest, we've all been in big, stupid meetings where we're like most of the people there are talking, don't have a big role. That's that's just corporate. We avoid those. We meet quickly. We I love a 15 minute meeting personally, so we at the start based on this 90 days that after I pick myself off the floor, when Christie said 90 days, we just knew that we were going to have to be efficient. And that means, you know, making just the stuff we need and nothing you know, nothing you don't need. So I think there was a was the ex chair, remember? That SUV was everything you need. Nothing. You don't. That was kind of our approach, and that served us well, Christie, on your end, the decide and go approach was partially just because, man, this is a tight timeline. But you see a lot of benefits to that approach. Now post this whole situation right where deciding go becomes just a way that you function. Talk to me about that for your team and how it kind of added fuel and energy to you guys. Yeah, absolutely. I think it was really important that we had a strong project plan going into this and everyone who was, you know, a stakeholder in this process. New. We're gonna decide and go situation. So, like Dave said, you know, we'd scheduled 30 minute meetings and...

...we knew at the end of that meeting there needed to be a decision, and that was going to be the decision. And then we move on because we knew if we didn't hit that it was going to move everything back and we could not Have that happen and still meet our January five deadline, our launch date. So it means coming into meetings and being really prepared. And one thing I said to Dave was, Okay, so you know, you come in with three ideas, And all three ideas are great ideas. Like if they pick one of those three, we have to be happy with it because we're not going back and, you know, recreating it. Sure, we can tweak and do things like that, but it really means doing your homework up front. And so Dave and Team did an awesome job taking us through brand workshops and, you know, interviewing the leadership team, interviewing people who work with clients, interviewing people who should have a stake in the brand As you're building the structure so that it can grow, and that has really paid off. So now when we go into meetings, it's like we can decide and go and be successful. We've proven that we did this in 90 days. I Never want to do something in 90 days again, but I'm sure it will happen. Yes, it's stressful, but there's also excitement that goes into it, and you do have to start making tough decisions quickly. But at least you're making decisions from, like, three really good options. Dave, as you come in and you have to have these initial conversations with key stakeholders like you mentioned, you've got to get as clear of a picture as possible. So how are you working to understand that vision and get that clear picture so that you can help build? Yeah, You know what we start with Hopefully in every case and certainly in this one was doing a lot of listening before we come up with any kind of, you know, here's what we should do. We did quite a bit of research. We talked to a lot of people, joined hands with Cristian team around the customer, so to speak, by really deeply understanding what they were looking, what customers need it, how we could help how this new entity,...

...these two companies that came together could help. Uh, And if you start from that and then do something that feels genuine for the company right that's relevant and engaging to the customer and unique in the competitive marketplace and you find that kind of middle ground. That was how we started the entire process. We kind of use that lens to guide us forward. And I think that's why we were one of the reasons that we were able to be as efficient and quick as we needed to be. Absolutely. One of the things I found fascinating that you took the team through was this archetype system that I think was a bit unique. Would you talk about that and what it clarified for you? Yeah, well, starting with archetypes. We didn't obviously invent that. That's Carl Young and, you know, basically came up with that. That whole system of 12, there's 12 of them, and many of the brands that we all know you know are associated with them. In fact, there was a study done That found an increase of 66% of value in the marketplace, with brands that associate themselves tightly with one of these archetypes. So if you think of like if I said rugged what what brand would you have? A lot of people will right away, you know, Jeep, right? You think of rebel. You think of Harley Davidson. You think of the Creator, for instance, Apple or Tesla so and on and on. Right at this stage, there's a sage archetype that's about wisdom. IBM would be one that would closely associate with that archetype. So in the days before 2020, when we all got virtualized, we would do this a lot of these exercises in the room, and we would do a lot of things standing up for the group of executives, and we have post its and and, you know, big reams of paper, and we do it that way. What we had done previous to kind of lockdown in early 2020 was created some digital tools that allowed us to do this. And they were also part of the...

...reason that this front end of the of the branding process happened as quickly as it as it did. We have a couple to digital tools. We have one that helps, um, that asks questions to leadership that helps arrive at what the archetype has agreed to be and then personality as well. And they ask questions like, You know, what? What's your mission? And you drag little little endings to these questions into positions of one you know, priority 12 and three. What would the market miss most if you weren't there? And you, You know, but and triangulating all these things were able to pretty quickly get to, uh, the archetype that was that was had a lot of agreement, and and, uh, and the personality that had a lot of agreement. And with that, we were able to get alignment far faster than usual. And and then I'll hand it to Christian team for being to decide and go, uh, culture, that just when they saw it, if we gave them good reason for it and it made sense, they didn't They didn't Navel gaze. They said, yes. Let's go. I think the other thing, too, is that then they felt like they were, and they were a part of it. They were part of building this brand, you know, their voice was incorporated immediately. So when they saw those little pieces in there, they're like, Hey, that that was for me. I like that like, Yeah, and there was a lot of alignment right away, so we knew we were in a good spot for that. Decide and go approach. When we saw that everyone was aligning to that pioneer archetype. Mm. When you think of what could have maybe gone wrong but didn't some common pitfalls that teams might have if they were to do this process again, sped up that again in the crunch that you guys were in. What are some of the things the pitfalls that you would say people should actively try to avoid? And Dave, let's start with you on this one. Don't make stuff you don't need. I've watched too many branding processes where you know we we we build the Acropolis or there's...

...a big pyramid and everything is you know, all this stuff is labeled and you get, you know, you spend all the time. This column is labeled this and this is a and for what? You know what do you use that forever? It goes into a drawer and it never gets used. Every single thing that we did had had a use, and it was all in order that we have used so many times that we've got this system down this branding system down. Just it's highly efficient, and Christie is nodding because it was. You get your you get What's your vision? What's the mission? What's the archetype? What's the personality? Um, what's the positioning? All that stuff and it all should inter relate. You don't Each one of those things shouldn't be a different cluster of words. They should all fit together like an efficient puzzle. And when they do, I think that made it easier for people to buy. And then to Christie's point, this wasn't a coat of paint that we came in and just started slapping on the walls of the near of marketing. Right? This this marketing this brand, which is another word for a promise to your customer, right? This brand was genuine to the company because it had all the people whose hands need to be in it. We're in it, and then it feels it doesn't feel like more Kool Aid, you know? I mean, we're all kind of, Let's face it, people are cynical, they're distracted. They're looking at their phones. Everybody listening to this podcast right now is probably looking at their phones. Everybody's distracted and and they've they've all got other things to be doing. So if we're not interesting, fast and relevant immediately, we lose their attention. So, um, I think it's as important for an internal group of people as it is for the external. People like that. Brands external, like you're talking to customers. You're talking about the marketplace. But internally, if people don't buy it, if people are like, yes, it's just, you know, whatever. I'm not This isn't for me. And this is just leaderships trying to get me to work harder for the same...

...thing, kind of think. Then you lose them. And that's why I think the process that we went through did bring people along and made them feel like this is their brand. It wasn't us coming in saying, you know, selling them something, and we were really helping them discover who they were. Yeah, Christy, what would you say? Yeah, I would add to that to just don't cut corners. Even though you're in this 90 day period, just very a tight turn. Don't cut corners in the beginning. Really define your mission, your vision, your values because, like Dave was saying, a brand is a promise to your customers. It's the soul of the company. If you don't define that and get buy in on that and have multiple people be a part of it. It will fail. So you really have to understand what the purpose of the company is and really build around that and create buying. And you cannot cut corners on that because that is the foundation. And everything good comes out of that when you get it right. Hey, everybody, Logan with sweet fish here if you've been listening to the show for a while, you know we're big proponents of putting out original organic content on linked in. But one thing that's always been a struggle for a team like ours is to easily track the reach of that linked in content. That's why I was really excited when I heard about Shield the other day from a connection on you guessed it linked in. Since our team started using shield, I've loved how it's led us easily track and analyze the performance of our LinkedIn content without having to manually log it ourselves. It automatically creates reports and generate some dashboards that are incredibly useful to see things like what contents been performing the best and what days of the week are we getting the most engagement and aren't average views per post. I'd highly suggest you guys check out this tool. If you're putting out content on linked in and if you're not, you should be. It's been a game changer for us. If you go to shield app dot ai and check out the 10 day free trial. You can even use our promo code B two B growth to get a 25% discount. Again, that's shield app dot ai And that promo code is B the...

...number to be growth All one word. All right, let's get back to the show. Yeah, I totally agree. One of the things I found so interesting in the 90 day approach because obviously we're talking to marketers. Salespeople were talking to be to be leaders, and we want to help them. Not everyone's going to be put in the situation you guys were in within the 90 day deadline. But a big take away from me when I hear the story is deadlines, whether artificial or very real, are extremely helpful. And so I wonder if we could talk about that for a second and the value you saw specifically in having that deadline, Maybe how people could use deadlines to their advantage, whether it's to create momentum in a team or how you've seen it really facilitate growth in your life and in your business is Christy. Let's start with you on that one. Yeah, I had this slide that I used in every company presentation because we were very transparent about what we were doing and how we were going to get there and I had milestones on each one. We're going to hit this by this date. We're gonna hit this by the next state, and I think even just like communicating it to the company is saying we're going to do this. I have told 300 people now that I am committed to making this happen and then kind of the positivity flip of taking that terror of telling people you're going to do something that's really, really hard, and you're not quite sure how you're gonna do it for, You know, there's a lot of things that can happen is changing that flipping it to excitement and using it as fuel to be like this is going to be amazing. And each of these milestones is like a celebration until we get to that end. January 5th launch where it's like the fireworks go off and the shuttle launches. And, you know, we had, like, pictures of NASA and shuttles taking off and, you know, like how amazing this was going to be like all the work was going to pay off. But just like nasa, you know, you have to have a checklist and you have to have everything, everything ready, and and and think it through very strategically,...

...or else your launch is going to be a disaster. So you know all that planning is very important and having those deadlines and all the things that you know, you're gonna you're gonna check off and get done. So it's just it's really important to have those milestones and to celebrate those milestones as you get there and get excited about. Look at that logo. It looks amazing. Everyone loves the mission, the values, it's all coming together, and they start to build on each other. So I think just going into any project, whether it's a brand launch or it could be something with product or even accounting, build excitement into the plan and make sure that you communicate those milestones and get the team. You know, build that momentum. Like you said, Benji, It's, like, so important to internally to build that that buy in and even inspire others by, you know, doing a huge project and bringing the team together and collaborating, bringing in partners and then sharing that success. Yeah, Dave, I wonder what your your thoughts are there. I love a deadline. I come from the creative community designers, writers. Nobody does anything without a deadline because they're doing everything else that has a deadline. So if you don't have a deadline Uh, yeah, deadlines are what made this project happen. And the other thing I gotta say, hats off. And don't skimp on project management. Hire a project manager. They are worth their weight in gold. Have one. And and listen to them and let them guide you through the process. They are just focused on hitting those deadlines. We would not have done it, but my right, Christy, we wouldn't. We wouldn't be here without Gayle. She, uh anyway, uh, absolutely. Project manager. And then I really feel like we were able to move quickly because the people that needed to be in the room, knew they needed to be in the room and they made time for it. And so I think respecting the process and being there not just not just physically, but being there, Giving it your full attention...

...when the sea level people at a correo now correo. But then new co, um showed up to meetings. They were not on their phones, they were 100% there and they were present in every way. And in that way we were able to move quickly because we got there consensus. We literally would go around and make sure everybody was heard and getting that alignment and then making sure they understood where we were in the process. We start every meeting with we back up two steps. Last time we were here, we did, and just those fundamental and, you know, it's kind of blocking and tackling. I watch the football game last night, so those blocking and tackling things really make a difference. And, um, project managers are really good. When you get a good one, Mail their feet to the floor because you'll you'll use them every time they make sure that stuff happens. And that's why I think we were able to deliver what we delivered in 90 days. Mm. You know, a big portion of Christy. What I hear you saying just a minute ago is the momentum that was created in this time period for your team. And it came from several things that you did right came from the deadlines that came from celebrating those winds along the way. But also, you guys were very intentional about how you named things. Is that right? And making sure that team members felt like they were a part of something bigger than themselves. So talk me through that. And what you guys did strategically there. Yeah. So, in building the brand, like I mentioned the mission, the values it's about getting by and internally first, um, not just from the people who were the stakeholders in, you know, some of the key decision making. But then all the people who are going to be a part of this brand who are delivering that promise and those are the employees. Nobody wants to be called an employee. I hate it when people call me an employee. You know, I'm a human. I want to be a part of something. And so just name your community, right? And so we named ourselves the Islanders, and that was actually Dave's idea. I remember when he sent me the email, I was like, What can we call ourselves? And he's like a couple names and then Islanders,...

...and I was like, Oh, that's risky. I don't know if they're going to go for that, but I think it's right because we're named after a Correa, which is a Greek island. And the reason why is because it's one of the blue zones and our mission is all about making the world a healthier place, one person at a time. There are Blue Zone where the people there live the longest, healthiest lives in in the world, right, so they're doing something right. And so we wanted to pattern ourselves after this island where people live healthy, meaningful, long lives. And so we thought, Why don't we become Islanders? And the first time I sent an email to everyone and called them Islanders, it took a deep breath like, Oh, this is this could blow up in my face or this could be really cool. And then Steve, our CEO, sent an email and he called them Islanders. And then it's stuck. And from from there on out, we have been Islanders, and people have really lashed onto that. And it's our community now. And, you know, we have t shirts about it. We have all kinds of things we have. Our QB are with an Islander theme. Um, it's really worked out well. And I think whenever you want to bring people together, you if you can name it, it's very helpful. Yeah. What was the the initial conversation? Was it just an ongoing thing between Dave between the two of you guys, or how did it come to like, we should name this, Dave, Was that something that maybe you would want to speak to? Sure. I think I'd back up and say all of this comes from, you know, again, the mission, the vision, the values, the positioning, all of this. We ended up in a career. I'm calling with the name and the name of the company was Think we brought, like, five or six to that presentation. All you know, all that had been mostly vetted and came in with that one, and that was one of our leading candidates. And I think that when you do have something that is on what you've determined your brand to be exciting was the personality and pioneer was the brand archetype. When...

...you get there, then you it just informs so many things. Like like the name of the company Ikaria. And then when you know, Christy reached out and said, You know, what should we call ourselves? And I think I threw over three or four ideas, but I was like, I really think you guys are just Islanders. I really thought, you know right away. It just felt like, yeah, it was a bit of a departure. And there's a leap of faith you take because, you know, everybody's be Excuse the expression, but there are B. S meters are just, you know, people are are a little cynical, you know, we're very marketing Saturday. We can see marketing coming at us, and that's as true internally as it is externally, you know? Um, yeah, I know marketing when I see it. And so if it feels like you're putting it on, um, then it doesn't work. But if it feels like it's it's completely and I an idea that's in line with what with what you know and what you are expecting of the brand and believe. And then it fits really nicely and an idea like that that may seem like it's a little out. There really isn't and those those are the geeky little things that make it fun to go to work. And I'm really every time Christy Carlson says, we need a, you know, piece of swag, a name or a thing or, you know, a new name for our our annual, you know, thought leadership event or something, and it all flows from that. So that's when I think it's working well, is when it doesn't feel put on, and it really feels like a part of the company. Yeah, I think part of the advantage you guys saw was in the fact that you were emerging two things right, because there was this fresh start aspect which definitely takes on risk but also brought in this not only need for unity, but this ability to man. If we had a name, we could kind of bring everybody in around this new thing you gave us something that we can kind of latch ourselves onto. So I love that. I think it would take a little bit more strategy if you have. You know, your organization's maybe more entrenched, you're not going through a rebrand and...

...you're going to just bring in a new name. I think that's where Davis spot on. There will be a B s meter that people can read if it's just trying to force momentum. But it's not really tied to Mission or it's not really tied division. People will see straight through that, and you're not going to get the desired effect. So making sure it's extremely tied to mission and vision that there is intention behind it. And then there's strategy as to even the fact that, I mean, when when you send out that email, you know people are going to look at and be like Oh, man, if they're calling it, you know, we're all Islanders now we're all bought into this now, So having the right sort of communication strategy as to how you release that, I think is is really important. Overall, I love this conversation. I love this idea of decide and go where we started and all the kind of ebbs and flows of this conversation. But Christy and then Dave, any follow up kind of last thoughts before we close this conversation? Sure. I think you know, I would just I just can't say enough that understanding the mission of your company, whether you're rebranding or you have a mission currently like using that more often in what you're doing. So, for example, if you're starting a planning meeting, you know, we started ours and they were like, close your eyes and think about the members that we serve and what are they going through? What are you know, what are they experiencing? And then the slide came up of our mission is to make the world a healthier place, one person at a time. Think about that person, you know, and really framing it up around the mission and the people that we serve, like Dave said, It's our promise to those members, too. You know, two people to help them to be healthier and and thinking about that every time you're doing some major decision making or you're even in an all company meeting and you're reminding your your Islanders or whatever you call yourselves, reminding them why we're here and why we do this. You know, you come home at night to your kids, you want to be able, or your family, your friends. You want to be able to be proud of where you work and what you do...

...every day. And if you don't know what your mission is at your company, try and find that just for yourself for your own good. Um, because it really does make a difference. And then when you do call people Islanders, they know an Islander has a mission. We are doing something good on this planet and we're doing it together, and that's why we work so hard. And that's why we're excited about what we do. So if you have your mission and you're committed to that, you know what it is. So many companies don't even know what their mission is, or it's like five sentences long, and you could never possibly repeat it, work on your mission and make it so that people can remember what it is, and then it's actually meaningful, and then integrate that into more of what you do and you'll see amazing results. Yeah. You know, there was an old ad that featured this kind of man sitting in a chair like this and used to like looking like, you know, like, he was just kind of disgruntled. And the copy of the ad said, I don't know you. I don't know your company. I don't know your history. I don't know what you stand for. I don't know. Blah, blah, blah. And I was like, you know, 10 10 of these lines, and at the end, it says Now, what was it that you wanted to sell me? And ultimately Christy and I work in the marketing department. Our job in a B two b setting is to hand. Qualified leads are the best leads we can we can give to the sales people who are going to close the deals. We don't close deals. We're not. We don't sell stuff. So what is most important for us is integrity. Why would they believe that? We can deliver what we say we can deliver. And the integrity comes from being the same. No matter where you are, whatever the touch point is and being authentic, companies love to talk that's always in the brand. Values were authentic, your authentic. If people experience the same you no matter where they experience you. And that's why connecting all this stuff is so important, actually, mission critical.

If you think of it that because otherwise if I see or if you, if your actions are different than your words or your different online than you were, you know in person. Uh, then you know, and I go to your offices and I'm like, Well, this is you know, what's what's that on the wall? We're constantly learning. That's what people do, and you're going to either teach me to expect the same things from you or expect you to be different. And our job is is to create that authenticity through integrity and making sure that the whole the whole company walks and talks as best we can in a way that's authentic to them and is consistent across all those touchpoints. And I think that's one of the reasons that this worked, as Christie has pointed out, is because of the teamwork that we have among our our team, but also not skipping steps and staying true to the process, which, If sometimes compressed, can actually be fun. I mean, I know you, Christy, but I had a great time is not only my fate. One of my favorite case studies in a 25 plus year career, but we had a blast. Yeah, a lot of times the executives would say, I'm so looking forward to this meeting. This was, you know, or they'd be like, This was the best meeting of my day. Now I have to go to this boring meeting. But I loved this meeting. I love that. Well, Dave Christy, thank you so much for sharing your insights and what you learned through this process. I'll give a quick, round up three things that I'm taking away from this conversation. First off, meaning and meaning leads, right? Vision leads. You gotta start there. If you don't have clarity around, that's gonna be really hard to do. Any of the other stuff that we talked about in this conversation? 2nd names and themes build unity and momentum. So do so intentionally based on what the first thing meaning and vision and then three deadlines can be fun. Also, deadlines are momentum builders. They create a buzz and they helped fuel innovation. And, uh, those are practical things we can take away from...

...this conversation. And we can be better for it in whatever business. Wherever you are listening to this from today, Dave. Christy, can you quickly just tell us where can people stay connected with you? How can people follow your work moving forward from here? For me, Lincoln is probably the best place to get a hold of me. Awesome, Dave. Yeah, Same Dave Cooper. It that linked in or human ideas. Human dash ideas dot com. Thanks for the plug. Absolutely. Thank you, guys, for being on B two b growth today. Listeners subscribe if you aren't already subscribed to be to be growth on whatever your favorite podcast platform is, we're always releasing content that will help fuel innovation in your business. And we'll be back soon with another episode. You can connect with me on LinkedIn as well. Just search Benji Block and keep doing work that matters. Mhm. Yeah. Is your buyer at B two B marketer? If so, you should think about sponsoring this podcast. BDB growth gets downloaded over 130,000 times each month and our listeners are marketing decision makers. If it sounds interesting, send Logan and email Logan at sweet fish media dot com.

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