Decide & Go, 90 Days to Launch! With Kristy Krueger & Dave Keepper

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Benji Block has a conversation with Kristy Krueger, VP of Marketing at Icario, and Dave Keepper, Creative Partner at Human Ideas. Together we tackle how deadlines can build momentum within your team, and the advantages of a decide and go approach.

Connect with Kristy:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristykrueger/

Connect with Dave:

https://www.linkedin.com/in/davekeepper/

Mhm. Yeah. Hello and welcome in To be to be growth,I'm your host. Benji Block B two B growth host here at Sweet Fish Media.And today I'm joined by some new friends, Kristi Krueger and Dave Pepper.Guys, welcome in to be to be growth. Thank you. Great to be here. So I'mglad to have you guys both here. I would love for each of you to just takea second. Christie, let's start with you. Explain where you work and kind ofwhat you do. Sure. So, um, I lead the marketing team at a cario. We helphealth plans to get their members to do things that are good for them. So Ithink of like going to your doctor for an office visit or getting your flushot or more serious things, like, you know, if we know a condition that youmight have, making sure you're getting into the right program or doing theright things to stay healthy. Awesome. And Dave, what about you? I am afounder and creative director at Human Ideas, where a virtual ad agency thathelps companies like, uh, Cario and Christie do everything from branding tomaking explanation type videos to writing scripts to I'm Her Man Friday.I guess we do what needs to get done. I love that. And I'm excited to get totalk to you guys at the same time, because you're each going to have suchunique vantage points on a process that you just walked through. And what we'regonna talk about today is really hitting fast forward on the brandingprocess. I've been so impressed to hear parts of Christie and Dave's story andhow they handled some really tight timelines to pull off all that's neededfrom a branding perspective. When a merger happens and really a new brandis born from scratch. What typically would take six months? They did inthree. So Christie paint for us. Just a picture of the task at hand. What wereyou tasked with? And then how did Dave become an asset in a key player in thisprocess? Sure, So it basically was to...

...companies coming together. Um, Novo andRebel were in the same space do the same thing, and so it made a lot ofsense for us to come together and offer more to the market and So the task athand was, you know, we don't want to stay. Revel, and we don't want to stay.No, but we want to come up with a brand new brand so that people you know havesome inspiration around us. They see this and they think they have allpositive thoughts coming in. So we really have this challenge then, ofOkay, what should that be? And where do we start? And how do we make it evenbetter than the brands that we were before? Uh, and do that in 90 days. Sonot only are you joining teams together that have never worked together beforethat actually were competitors and saying, Okay, you're on the samemarketing team now let's let's create this brand where you know it unites usand creates this momentum that we are doing something great for the market.And how do we package that up in a way that people will understand it and be,you know, excited by it and have it be inspiring? Three months? We're going todo that in 90 days. Like why? Why is it 90 days like that's That's a very shortterm for a lot of the things that that would involve, like a new website, anew name that has to go through legal new teams coming together, newcollateral. You know, everything is new, which is exciting and fun, but in 90days, that quite the challenge. So in that circumstance, you have to makesure you have the right partners and people who are brave and ready to just,like, jump in and make this happen and have a similar approach to the work.And so that's why Dave is on this call because he was my first person to reachout to a human ideas. I've worked with him in the past, and I don't rememberwhat the first Call was, but I remember the reaction to 90 days. Do youremember Dave? I don't think I I think I used proper English. I don't thinkthere was too much too much surprised. Yeah, it was definitely an accelerateaccelerated timeline. Oftentimes, agencies, I'm going to say two thingsabout agencies. I came. I came up...

...through the advertising agency world,and I think agencies sometimes are capable of moving faster than clients,and that's simply because the clients their thing right, and you have toprove something in your It's easier for us to name to throw names at you. Thenyou just say, Yes, that's the name forever. I'm going to, you know, Andthen you have layers and different people who who may or not beinfluencing that decision, who may or may not be in the meeting. So my firstquestion was, Are we going to get access to the decision makers? AndChristy assured me of that. And so right away I was like that put me atease. And then there's an efficiency that I have found post advertisingagency life, that we are deciding to go kind of team as, well, big. So we'veall been in. Let's let's be honest, we've all been in big, stupid meetingswhere we're like most of the people there are talking, don't have a bigrole. That's that's just corporate. We avoid those. We meet quickly. We I lovea 15 minute meeting personally, so we at the start based on this 90 days thatafter I pick myself off the floor, when Christie said 90 days, we just knewthat we were going to have to be efficient. And that means, you know,making just the stuff we need and nothing you know, nothing you don'tneed. So I think there was a was the ex chair, remember? That SUV waseverything you need. Nothing. You don't. That was kind of our approach, and thatserved us well, Christie, on your end, the decide and go approach waspartially just because, man, this is a tight timeline. But you see a lot ofbenefits to that approach. Now post this whole situation right wheredeciding go becomes just a way that you function. Talk to me about that foryour team and how it kind of added fuel and energy to you guys. Yeah,absolutely. I think it was really important that we had a strong projectplan going into this and everyone who was, you know, a stakeholder in thisprocess. New. We're gonna decide and go situation. So, like Dave said, you know,we'd scheduled 30 minute meetings and...

...we knew at the end of that meetingthere needed to be a decision, and that was going to be the decision. And thenwe move on because we knew if we didn't hit that it was going to moveeverything back and we could not Have that happen and still meet our Januaryfive deadline, our launch date. So it means coming into meetings and beingreally prepared. And one thing I said to Dave was, Okay, so you know, youcome in with three ideas, And all three ideas are great ideas. Like if theypick one of those three, we have to be happy with it because we're not goingback and, you know, recreating it. Sure, we can tweak and do things like that,but it really means doing your homework up front. And so Dave and Team did anawesome job taking us through brand workshops and, you know, interviewingthe leadership team, interviewing people who work with clients,interviewing people who should have a stake in the brand As you're buildingthe structure so that it can grow, and that has really paid off. So now whenwe go into meetings, it's like we can decide and go and be successful. We'veproven that we did this in 90 days. I Never want to do something in 90 daysagain, but I'm sure it will happen. Yes, it's stressful, but there's alsoexcitement that goes into it, and you do have to start making tough decisionsquickly. But at least you're making decisions from, like, three really goodoptions. Dave, as you come in and you have to have these initialconversations with key stakeholders like you mentioned, you've got to getas clear of a picture as possible. So how are you working to understand thatvision and get that clear picture so that you can help build? Yeah, You knowwhat we start with Hopefully in every case and certainly in this one wasdoing a lot of listening before we come up with any kind of, you know, here'swhat we should do. We did quite a bit of research. We talked to a lot ofpeople, joined hands with Cristian team around the customer, so to speak, byreally deeply understanding what they were looking, what customers need it,how we could help how this new entity,...

...these two companies that came togethercould help. Uh, And if you start from that and then do something that feelsgenuine for the company right that's relevant and engaging to the customerand unique in the competitive marketplace and you find that kind ofmiddle ground. That was how we started the entire process. We kind of use thatlens to guide us forward. And I think that's why we were one of the reasonsthat we were able to be as efficient and quick as we needed to be.Absolutely. One of the things I found fascinating that you took the teamthrough was this archetype system that I think was a bit unique. Would youtalk about that and what it clarified for you? Yeah, well, starting witharchetypes. We didn't obviously invent that. That's Carl Young and, you know,basically came up with that. That whole system of 12, there's 12 of them, andmany of the brands that we all know you know are associated with them. In fact,there was a study done That found an increase of 66% of value in themarketplace, with brands that associate themselves tightly with one of thesearchetypes. So if you think of like if I said rugged what what brand would youhave? A lot of people will right away, you know, Jeep, right? You think ofrebel. You think of Harley Davidson. You think of the Creator, for instance,Apple or Tesla so and on and on. Right at this stage, there's a sage archetypethat's about wisdom. IBM would be one that would closely associate with thatarchetype. So in the days before 2020, when we all got virtualized, we woulddo this a lot of these exercises in the room, and we would do a lot of thingsstanding up for the group of executives, and we have post its and and, you know,big reams of paper, and we do it that way. What we had done previous to kindof lockdown in early 2020 was created some digital tools that allowed us todo this. And they were also part of the...

...reason that this front end of the ofthe branding process happened as quickly as it as it did. We have acouple to digital tools. We have one that helps, um, that asks questions toleadership that helps arrive at what the archetype has agreed to be and thenpersonality as well. And they ask questions like, You know, what? What'syour mission? And you drag little little endings to these questions intopositions of one you know, priority 12 and three. What would the market missmost if you weren't there? And you, You know, but and triangulating all thesethings were able to pretty quickly get to, uh, the archetype that was that washad a lot of agreement, and and, uh, and the personality that had a lot ofagreement. And with that, we were able to get alignment far faster than usual.And and then I'll hand it to Christian team for being to decide and go, uh,culture, that just when they saw it, if we gave them good reason for it and itmade sense, they didn't They didn't Navel gaze. They said, yes. Let's go. Ithink the other thing, too, is that then they felt like they were, and theywere a part of it. They were part of building this brand, you know, theirvoice was incorporated immediately. So when they saw those little pieces inthere, they're like, Hey, that that was for me. I like that like, Yeah, andthere was a lot of alignment right away, so we knew we were in a good spot forthat. Decide and go approach. When we saw that everyone was aligning to thatpioneer archetype. Mm. When you think of what could have maybe gone wrong butdidn't some common pitfalls that teams might have if they were to do thisprocess again, sped up that again in the crunch that you guys were in. Whatare some of the things the pitfalls that you would say people shouldactively try to avoid? And Dave, let's start with you on this one. Don't makestuff you don't need. I've watched too many branding processes where you knowwe we we build the Acropolis or there's...

...a big pyramid and everything is youknow, all this stuff is labeled and you get, you know, you spend all the time.This column is labeled this and this is a and for what? You know what do youuse that forever? It goes into a drawer and it never gets used. Every singlething that we did had had a use, and it was all in order that we have used somany times that we've got this system down this branding system down. Justit's highly efficient, and Christie is nodding because it was. You get youryou get What's your vision? What's the mission? What's the archetype? What'sthe personality? Um, what's the positioning? All that stuff and it allshould inter relate. You don't Each one of those things shouldn't be adifferent cluster of words. They should all fit together like an efficientpuzzle. And when they do, I think that made it easier for people to buy. Andthen to Christie's point, this wasn't a coat of paint that we came in and juststarted slapping on the walls of the near of marketing. Right? This thismarketing this brand, which is another word for a promise to your customer,right? This brand was genuine to the company because it had all the peoplewhose hands need to be in it. We're in it, and then it feels it doesn't feellike more Kool Aid, you know? I mean, we're all kind of, Let's face it,people are cynical, they're distracted. They're looking at their phones.Everybody listening to this podcast right now is probably looking at theirphones. Everybody's distracted and and they've they've all got other things tobe doing. So if we're not interesting, fast and relevant immediately, we losetheir attention. So, um, I think it's as important for an internal group ofpeople as it is for the external. People like that. Brands external, likeyou're talking to customers. You're talking about the marketplace. Butinternally, if people don't buy it, if people are like, yes, it's just, youknow, whatever. I'm not This isn't for me. And this is just leaderships tryingto get me to work harder for the same...

...thing, kind of think. Then you losethem. And that's why I think the process that we went through did bringpeople along and made them feel like this is their brand. It wasn't uscoming in saying, you know, selling them something, and we were reallyhelping them discover who they were. Yeah, Christy, what would you say? Yeah,I would add to that to just don't cut corners. Even though you're in this 90day period, just very a tight turn. Don't cut corners in the beginning.Really define your mission, your vision, your values because, like Dave wassaying, a brand is a promise to your customers. It's the soul of the company.If you don't define that and get buy in on that and have multiple people be apart of it. It will fail. So you really have to understand what the purpose ofthe company is and really build around that and create buying. And you cannotcut corners on that because that is the foundation. And everything good comesout of that when you get it right. Hey, everybody, Logan with sweet fish hereif you've been listening to the show for a while, you know we're bigproponents of putting out original organic content on linked in. But onething that's always been a struggle for a team like ours is to easily track thereach of that linked in content. That's why I was really excited when I heardabout Shield the other day from a connection on you guessed it linked in.Since our team started using shield, I've loved how it's led us easily trackand analyze the performance of our LinkedIn content without having tomanually log it ourselves. It automatically creates reports andgenerate some dashboards that are incredibly useful to see things likewhat contents been performing the best and what days of the week are wegetting the most engagement and aren't average views per post. I'd highlysuggest you guys check out this tool. If you're putting out content on linkedin and if you're not, you should be. It's been a game changer for us. If yougo to shield app dot ai and check out the 10 day free trial. You can even useour promo code B two B growth to get a 25% discount. Again, that's shield appdot ai And that promo code is B the...

...number to be growth All one word. Allright, let's get back to the show. Yeah, I totally agree. One of the things Ifound so interesting in the 90 day approach because obviously we'retalking to marketers. Salespeople were talking to be to be leaders, and wewant to help them. Not everyone's going to be put in the situation you guyswere in within the 90 day deadline. But a big take away from me when I hear thestory is deadlines, whether artificial or very real, are extremely helpful.And so I wonder if we could talk about that for a second and the value you sawspecifically in having that deadline, Maybe how people could use deadlines totheir advantage, whether it's to create momentum in a team or how you've seenit really facilitate growth in your life and in your business is Christy.Let's start with you on that one. Yeah, I had this slide that I used in everycompany presentation because we were very transparent about what we weredoing and how we were going to get there and I had milestones on each one.We're going to hit this by this date. We're gonna hit this by the next state,and I think even just like communicating it to the company issaying we're going to do this. I have told 300 people now that I am committedto making this happen and then kind of the positivity flip of taking thatterror of telling people you're going to do something that's really, reallyhard, and you're not quite sure how you're gonna do it for, You know,there's a lot of things that can happen is changing that flipping it toexcitement and using it as fuel to be like this is going to be amazing. Andeach of these milestones is like a celebration until we get to that end.January 5th launch where it's like the fireworks go off and the shuttlelaunches. And, you know, we had, like, pictures of NASA and shuttles takingoff and, you know, like how amazing this was going to be like all the workwas going to pay off. But just like nasa, you know, you have to have achecklist and you have to have everything, everything ready, and andand think it through very strategically,...

...or else your launch is going to be adisaster. So you know all that planning is very important and having thosedeadlines and all the things that you know, you're gonna you're gonna checkoff and get done. So it's just it's really important to have thosemilestones and to celebrate those milestones as you get there and getexcited about. Look at that logo. It looks amazing. Everyone loves themission, the values, it's all coming together, and they start to build oneach other. So I think just going into any project, whether it's a brandlaunch or it could be something with product or even accounting, buildexcitement into the plan and make sure that you communicate those milestonesand get the team. You know, build that momentum. Like you said, Benji, It's,like, so important to internally to build that that buy in and even inspireothers by, you know, doing a huge project and bringing the team togetherand collaborating, bringing in partners and then sharing that success. Yeah,Dave, I wonder what your your thoughts are there. I love a deadline. I comefrom the creative community designers, writers. Nobody does anything without adeadline because they're doing everything else that has a deadline. Soif you don't have a deadline Uh, yeah, deadlines are what made this projecthappen. And the other thing I gotta say, hats off. And don't skimp on projectmanagement. Hire a project manager. They are worth their weight in gold.Have one. And and listen to them and let them guide you through the process.They are just focused on hitting those deadlines. We would not have done it,but my right, Christy, we wouldn't. We wouldn't be here without Gayle. She, uhanyway, uh, absolutely. Project manager. And then I really feel like we wereable to move quickly because the people that needed to be in the room, knewthey needed to be in the room and they made time for it. And so I thinkrespecting the process and being there not just not just physically, but beingthere, Giving it your full attention...

...when the sea level people at a correonow correo. But then new co, um showed up to meetings. They were not on theirphones, they were 100% there and they were present in every way. And in thatway we were able to move quickly because we got there consensus. Weliterally would go around and make sure everybody was heard and getting thatalignment and then making sure they understood where we were in the process.We start every meeting with we back up two steps. Last time we were here, wedid, and just those fundamental and, you know, it's kind of blocking andtackling. I watch the football game last night, so those blocking andtackling things really make a difference. And, um, project managersare really good. When you get a good one, Mail their feet to the floorbecause you'll you'll use them every time they make sure that stuff happens.And that's why I think we were able to deliver what we delivered in 90 days.Mm. You know, a big portion of Christy. What I hear you saying just a minuteago is the momentum that was created in this time period for your team. And itcame from several things that you did right came from the deadlines that camefrom celebrating those winds along the way. But also, you guys were veryintentional about how you named things. Is that right? And making sure thatteam members felt like they were a part of something bigger than themselves. Sotalk me through that. And what you guys did strategically there. Yeah. So, inbuilding the brand, like I mentioned the mission, the values it's aboutgetting by and internally first, um, not just from the people who were thestakeholders in, you know, some of the key decision making. But then all thepeople who are going to be a part of this brand who are delivering thatpromise and those are the employees. Nobody wants to be called an employee.I hate it when people call me an employee. You know, I'm a human. I wantto be a part of something. And so just name your community, right? And so wenamed ourselves the Islanders, and that was actually Dave's idea. I rememberwhen he sent me the email, I was like, What can we call ourselves? And he'slike a couple names and then Islanders,...

...and I was like, Oh, that's risky. Idon't know if they're going to go for that, but I think it's right becausewe're named after a Correa, which is a Greek island. And the reason why isbecause it's one of the blue zones and our mission is all about making theworld a healthier place, one person at a time. There are Blue Zone where thepeople there live the longest, healthiest lives in in the world, right,so they're doing something right. And so we wanted to pattern ourselves afterthis island where people live healthy, meaningful, long lives. And so wethought, Why don't we become Islanders? And the first time I sent an email toeveryone and called them Islanders, it took a deep breath like, Oh, this isthis could blow up in my face or this could be really cool. And then Steve,our CEO, sent an email and he called them Islanders. And then it's stuck.And from from there on out, we have been Islanders, and people have reallylashed onto that. And it's our community now. And, you know, we have tshirts about it. We have all kinds of things we have. Our QB are with anIslander theme. Um, it's really worked out well. And I think whenever you wantto bring people together, you if you can name it, it's very helpful. Yeah.What was the the initial conversation? Was it just an ongoing thing betweenDave between the two of you guys, or how did it come to like, we should namethis, Dave, Was that something that maybe you would want to speak to? Sure.I think I'd back up and say all of this comes from, you know, again, themission, the vision, the values, the positioning, all of this. We ended upin a career. I'm calling with the name and the name of the company was Thinkwe brought, like, five or six to that presentation. All you know, all thathad been mostly vetted and came in with that one, and that was one of ourleading candidates. And I think that when you do have something that is onwhat you've determined your brand to be exciting was the personality andpioneer was the brand archetype. When...

...you get there, then you it just informsso many things. Like like the name of the company Ikaria. And then when youknow, Christy reached out and said, You know, what should we call ourselves?And I think I threw over three or four ideas, but I was like, I really thinkyou guys are just Islanders. I really thought, you know right away. It justfelt like, yeah, it was a bit of a departure. And there's a leap of faithyou take because, you know, everybody's be Excuse the expression, but there areB. S meters are just, you know, people are are a little cynical, you know,we're very marketing Saturday. We can see marketing coming at us, and that'sas true internally as it is externally, you know? Um, yeah, I know marketingwhen I see it. And so if it feels like you're putting it on, um, then itdoesn't work. But if it feels like it's it's completely and I an idea that's inline with what with what you know and what you are expecting of the brand andbelieve. And then it fits really nicely and an idea like that that may seemlike it's a little out. There really isn't and those those are the geekylittle things that make it fun to go to work. And I'm really every time ChristyCarlson says, we need a, you know, piece of swag, a name or a thing or,you know, a new name for our our annual, you know, thought leadership event orsomething, and it all flows from that. So that's when I think it's workingwell, is when it doesn't feel put on, and it really feels like a part of thecompany. Yeah, I think part of the advantage you guys saw was in the factthat you were emerging two things right, because there was this fresh startaspect which definitely takes on risk but also brought in this not only needfor unity, but this ability to man. If we had a name, we could kind of bringeverybody in around this new thing you gave us something that we can kind oflatch ourselves onto. So I love that. I think it would take a little bit morestrategy if you have. You know, your organization's maybe more entrenched,you're not going through a rebrand and...

...you're going to just bring in a newname. I think that's where Davis spot on. There will be a B s meter thatpeople can read if it's just trying to force momentum. But it's not reallytied to Mission or it's not really tied division. People will see straightthrough that, and you're not going to get the desired effect. So making sureit's extremely tied to mission and vision that there is intention behindit. And then there's strategy as to even the fact that, I mean, when whenyou send out that email, you know people are going to look at and be likeOh, man, if they're calling it, you know, we're all Islanders now we're allbought into this now, So having the right sort of communication strategy asto how you release that, I think is is really important. Overall, I love thisconversation. I love this idea of decide and go where we started and allthe kind of ebbs and flows of this conversation. But Christy and then Dave,any follow up kind of last thoughts before we close this conversation? Sure.I think you know, I would just I just can't say enough that understanding themission of your company, whether you're rebranding or you have a missioncurrently like using that more often in what you're doing. So, for example, ifyou're starting a planning meeting, you know, we started ours and they werelike, close your eyes and think about the members that we serve and what arethey going through? What are you know, what are they experiencing? And thenthe slide came up of our mission is to make the world a healthier place, oneperson at a time. Think about that person, you know, and really framing itup around the mission and the people that we serve, like Dave said, It's ourpromise to those members, too. You know, two people to help them to be healthierand and thinking about that every time you're doing some major decision makingor you're even in an all company meeting and you're reminding your yourIslanders or whatever you call yourselves, reminding them why we'rehere and why we do this. You know, you come home at night to your kids, youwant to be able, or your family, your friends. You want to be able to beproud of where you work and what you do...

...every day. And if you don't know whatyour mission is at your company, try and find that just for yourself foryour own good. Um, because it really does make a difference. And then whenyou do call people Islanders, they know an Islander has a mission. We are doingsomething good on this planet and we're doing it together, and that's why wework so hard. And that's why we're excited about what we do. So if youhave your mission and you're committed to that, you know what it is. So manycompanies don't even know what their mission is, or it's like five sentenceslong, and you could never possibly repeat it, work on your mission andmake it so that people can remember what it is, and then it's actuallymeaningful, and then integrate that into more of what you do and you'll seeamazing results. Yeah. You know, there was an old ad that featured this kindof man sitting in a chair like this and used to like looking like, you know,like, he was just kind of disgruntled. And the copy of the ad said, I don'tknow you. I don't know your company. I don't know your history. I don't knowwhat you stand for. I don't know. Blah, blah, blah. And I was like, you know,10 10 of these lines, and at the end, it says Now, what was it that youwanted to sell me? And ultimately Christy and I work in the marketingdepartment. Our job in a B two b setting is to hand. Qualified leads arethe best leads we can we can give to the sales people who are going to closethe deals. We don't close deals. We're not. We don't sell stuff. So what ismost important for us is integrity. Why would they believe that? We can deliverwhat we say we can deliver. And the integrity comes from being the same. Nomatter where you are, whatever the touch point is and being authentic,companies love to talk that's always in the brand. Values were authentic, yourauthentic. If people experience the same you no matter where theyexperience you. And that's why connecting all this stuff is soimportant, actually, mission critical.

If you think of it that becauseotherwise if I see or if you, if your actions are different than your wordsor your different online than you were, you know in person. Uh, then you know,and I go to your offices and I'm like, Well, this is you know, what's what'sthat on the wall? We're constantly learning. That's what people do, andyou're going to either teach me to expect the same things from you orexpect you to be different. And our job is is to create that authenticitythrough integrity and making sure that the whole the whole company walks andtalks as best we can in a way that's authentic to them and is consistentacross all those touchpoints. And I think that's one of the reasons thatthis worked, as Christie has pointed out, is because of the teamwork that wehave among our our team, but also not skipping steps and staying true to theprocess, which, If sometimes compressed, can actually be fun. I mean, I know you,Christy, but I had a great time is not only my fate. One of my favorite casestudies in a 25 plus year career, but we had a blast. Yeah, a lot of timesthe executives would say, I'm so looking forward to this meeting. Thiswas, you know, or they'd be like, This was the best meeting of my day. Now Ihave to go to this boring meeting. But I loved this meeting. I love that. Well,Dave Christy, thank you so much for sharing your insights and what youlearned through this process. I'll give a quick, round up three things that I'mtaking away from this conversation. First off, meaning and meaning leads,right? Vision leads. You gotta start there. If you don't have clarity around,that's gonna be really hard to do. Any of the other stuff that we talked aboutin this conversation? 2nd names and themes build unity and momentum. So doso intentionally based on what the first thing meaning and vision and thenthree deadlines can be fun. Also, deadlines are momentum builders. Theycreate a buzz and they helped fuel innovation. And, uh, those arepractical things we can take away from...

...this conversation. And we can be betterfor it in whatever business. Wherever you are listening to this from today,Dave. Christy, can you quickly just tell us where can people stay connectedwith you? How can people follow your work moving forward from here? For me,Lincoln is probably the best place to get a hold of me. Awesome, Dave. Yeah,Same Dave Cooper. It that linked in or human ideas. Human dash ideas dot com.Thanks for the plug. Absolutely. Thank you, guys, for being on B two b growthtoday. Listeners subscribe if you aren't already subscribed to be to begrowth on whatever your favorite podcast platform is, we're alwaysreleasing content that will help fuel innovation in your business. And we'llbe back soon with another episode. You can connect with me on LinkedIn as well.Just search Benji Block and keep doing work that matters. Mhm. Yeah. Is your buyer at B two B marketer? Ifso, you should think about sponsoring this podcast. BDB growth getsdownloaded over 130,000 times each month and our listeners are marketingdecision makers. If it sounds interesting, send Logan and email Loganat sweet fish media dot com.

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