Create a Content Waterwheel That Accelerates the Impact of Your Content Marketing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, Dan Sanchez discusses (and practices) an idea of combining three content marketing disciplines in order to get the most leverage with each piece of content.

...mhm Welcome back to BBB growth. I'm danSanchez, my friends call me dan says, and I'm here to talk about the contentwaterwheel approach now in case you're like, wait, did he just say waterwheeldan, do you mean content? Flywheel? I'm mixing two metaphors for this one andone of them is the content waterfall and the other one is the contentflywheel because I find that there's some concepts you can blend together toreally help your content marketing just go farther and faster to kind of getmore virology out of it and honestly kind of have a good mix of the, likethe quantity play, we like to see it, sweet fish media and the quality playthat so many people, you know, bang the table for so often. So here's the ideathe content waterwheel again is a blend of the waterfall approach and thecontent flywheel approach and a little bit of what jim Collins calls thebullet approach. So let's kind of cover...

...each one and then talk about how we'regonna blend together to achieve maximum effectiveness with your contentmarketing. Starting backwards with the waterfall. Now, if you've heard us forvery long, you know that we're a huge fan of the content waterfall. So thecontent waterfall works like this, it's like creating a solid piece of content,usually a long form piece, it could be a blog post, it can be a youtube video,it could be a podcast, like the one I'm recording right now and then taking itand breaking it up into all the smaller pieces to promote across all the otherchannels. So if I publish this podcast that's turning it into a blog post andthen turning it into maybe a Youtube clip and then a micro video and somesocial posts or maybe multiple social post. Right? Taking that big piece ofcontent and turn it into a lot of other pieces of content. All usually linkingback to the bigger piece of content that is what you call the contentwaterfall. Now on the other side, there's a content flywheel where onceyou start doing it, it starts to build...

...momentum. It's some kind of contentsystematic content creation that once you do more and more of it, it buildsmomentum. Right? So that can often happen with search engine optimization,right? The more blog posts you get to rank, the easier it is for the nextblog post too. Right? Because you're starting to build domain authority andthe more that rank the faster it goes and it takes a while to get started.But once you have a good S. E. O uh flywheel going, it can really start toproduce results. And so I'm blending that into it too. And then of coursethe little bullet approach from Jim Collins book, I think it's from good togreat, but it might be great to last. I don't know, it's one of his books, thebullet approach which is takes instead of taking firing cannonballs at everynew idea, like take a pistol and just shoot little tiny shots at it, be doinglittle experiments all the time trying out a little idea here. A little ideathere. Another little idea over there and then seeing which ones actuallyconnect before you aim the cannon of execution at it to do something to dosomething really drastic behind it,...

...right? You want to try and test littlethings. So here's how the content waterwheel approach works for contentmarketer. At least what I've been experimenting with between the channelsof my linkedin profile and this very podcast. So what I'm doing is I'mcreating multiple pieces of small content on linkedin anytime I have awhim, anytime I have a new idea, any time I've been even thinking aboutsomething and then posting, I'm posting it to linkedin, right? I'm posting tolinkedin multiple times a day. But this would work even if you're not posting 1,23 times a day, like I am just be posting all your ideas to social media,most of them will be okay, don't just be okay, get a few 100 views, few 1000views whatever is the norm, but every once in a while you're gonna comeacross something for me, it's about once, twice a week where an idea reallyconnects. It's not just the way you wrote, it's the idea itself and lots ofpeople comment, it gets farther reach...

...than normal and you know, you havesomething really, really good, this podcast is actually a result of that. Iposted this, my linkedin page and this post did really well. Hence I'm herenow recording an episode about it to actually practice what I preach thereagain, that's kind of like taking the bullet approach to social media, tryingout lots of different things in small little chunks and if it fails it fails,that's okay. But every once in a while you're gonna hit something good. And weas marketers as much as we like to think, we know what's gonna work, likewe don't, we have to test things right and social media is a great place totest things out to see which ones work. Now the ones that connect, that's whereyou start to go back, the ones that connect you then take to your long formmedia and you know, it's good because people are already taking the littlepiece nugget you threw out there. So let's expand on the ones that work andflush them out to be a full blog post to be a full podcast episode. You flushit out and then you go and take that,...

...which is now pillar content and you? Reposted to social media again, not the same way you did before, which wasreally a teaser the main idea, but now you're going to flush it out becauseyou have pillar content to go and break it up in a different chunks so you cancome at it from all the different angles. So that way you create, what isthe water wheel and it goes round and round and round and hopefully fasterand faster and kind of almost think about it like a damn right, like a damnthe waterfall like just produces so much momentum and gets the all thegears spinning to produce some significant electricity, right? So thisis kind of like the water wheel and action because each time you get betterand better at creating all those pieces of content and maybe one of thosepieces you broke up for the waterfall do it exceptionally well, a specificexample or a way of saying it, you're like you let's run it back throughagain because that particular angle resonated a bit more, maybe you canturn that back into a specific angle, you need to take back through thepillar or back through a long form content again. So again you need tochannels for this, a short form and...

...long form, but between the two, you canreally get this thing spinning and it becomes a little bit more viral eachtime now. Again you got to be always testing out new ideas to get it inthere, but you should be able to find things that work in order to put themback into your long form content machine. So with that in mind, I thinkmost people will understand like the testing the ideas phase, like all thesocial media marketers and content marketers are like, okay, we can dothat, we can test more ideas. But what do you do when you want to take theidea and then flush it out into a bigger piece of content. So I wanted tokind of use like a very tried and true framework in order to flush it out, andthat's just using the five Ws and how coming up with where did the idea comefrom, Is there an origin story? Where did you come up with this idea? Did itlike occur to you while you were taking a shower on a run on a bike ride in thecar? Were you listening to somebody else? Were you reading a book? Give ussome context. How did you come up with this idea? What is the idea? Right? Yougotta cover that probably first. Who is...

...the idea for? And why should they careabout this idea? How would they implement it? Step by step? Right. SoI'm just walking through the five Ws and how in order to flush out the ideaand then just taking some more time to expand on it. So, let me give you someexamples as I try to even practice again, What I'm talking about here.Walking through the W is like, what does this actually look like? Now? Thismodel can lead to a lot of exciting, different types of content that youprobably weren't even thinking about before, But as I've done this over andover again for the last year, here's some of the things I've seen otherpeople do what it's led to for others and what it's led to even for myself orfor sweet fish. So doing this method of testing out a bunch of little ideas canlead to larger thought leadership ideas or pieces, for example, Dave Gearharttested a small idea, he's testing...

...little ideas all the time with hislinkedin, but one stuck with him and now it has become a pillar of what he'sknown for and that's life is too short to work for a ceo that doesn't getmarketing. It's literally become like his his main idea, the thing around hiscommunity rallies around it can also lead to stronger points of view. As youtest out different ideas and stuff, you might find that some of your ideas havepush back, have resistance and you'll find that some people love it. Somepeople hate it and sometimes you'll find out that well you're wrong, youget proven wrong and you're like, okay, hopefully your humble enough to admitit, but sometimes you're like, you know what, After having some goodconversation about this, I only feel more confident in my stance on this andthose become really strong points of view. This happened to me about a yearago and James really rallied with me at Sweet fish media around the idea thatquantity is better than quality because quantity often leads to quality andwe're always judging what quality is too much internally and we just need tothrow out the idea rough in order to...

...test out to see even what resonateswith people I think were too harsh and I don't want to dive too much into thatidea. But you can kind of see where it's going. There's a lot of peoplethat hated it. There's a lot of people that loved it. It became a strong pointof view that I hold with James and Sweet fish media now, but it was firsttested through a single link in post and then I posted lots of posts aboutit. Then it created a whole podcast episode about it and then it wasflushed out more into more podcast episodes and now I'm here talking aboutit again using the water wheel model. You can create new campaigns aroundthis, we started posting and talking about Arlington evangelists programthat we use internally. Sweet fish. Now we've created whole podcast about itshoot, we've been invited to speak on other podcast about it and we'reprobably gonna turn it into a live webinar coming up soon. And then itprobably into a video series on how to use a link to an evangelist program foryour employees. But it all started with just posting about it because we weredoing something, it was unique and a lot of people wanted to know more aboutit. So that post got traction, we turned it into the pillar content backand forth that went into the water...

...wheel and we're not even done with that,that water we'll still running and running, we keep finding new aspects ofit because it's a bigger idea. It takes a lot of time to flush it out. We'restill discovering new things about it so it can lead to a whole new contentcampaigns, it can lead to new products. I remember, gosh years ago, probablyseven years ago, john O Nolan posted a blog post that went viral, I think ontwitter about how Wordpress is flawed and what he would do to redesignwordpress from scratch, It went so viral that he ended up putting togetherlike a go fund me not a go. Fund me like an Indiegogo, I can't remember theother one, but you know, like one of those crowdsourcing platforms to fundhis idea and it was highly successful and he's built a whole alternative toWordpress called Ghost, but it started with a small little bullet to see ifthere, if the idea even resonated, it could have got some traction, but notenough to show him that this needed to become a whole product and now it'schanged his life forever more because...

...he's the Ceo and founder of thatcompany, it could lead to a whole new brand element, you might and in fact Ifind the best brands or the ones that evolve over time using this. If youlook at a lot of people like Gary V like he didn't start off as robust ashe is. Like he's built it one piece at a time based on what's going, what'sresonated with people as he's posted, he's posting ideas all the time andconstantly keeping the ones and pulling them closer that really hit right forhim. It's like the idea of documenting the journey, I think he just randomlysaid that Nicole once and that became thing that resonated that now he goesback to all the time that happened to me about a year ago. I was just comingup with a custom hashtag because it was kind of a cool thing that I saw a fewother people do and it ended up becoming a core pillar of my personalbrand because my hashtag became hashtag Danchev is right, that's a nickname.Some people used for me. I had other nicknames, but that became a core partof my don't know my, my personal brand. So people call me dan says all the timenow. And of course I end every post with Sanchez, but I even renamed myhome personal site around Sanchez dot...

...com instead of daniel Sanchez dot comshorter is better. And Dench is just way more memorable and interesting,right? It takes a two name word and puts it into 11 name, Sanchezsummarizing my first, my last right and that's just work shoot I even startedoff this episode saying my friends call me dan says because they do. So you cansee how this is a really powerful idea. Shoot little content experiments outthere on a regular basis. Take the ones that are hits, turn them into biggerpieces of content, full pillar posts or episodes like this one and then take itand redistribute that pillar post into a bunch of smaller pieces to come at itfrom different angles or different segments. Right, So I'm going to handover this episode, this full episode to my, my linkedin content writer whowrites, I don't know, she writes about a third of my content from linkedin andshe's gonna take and break this up into a bunch of other posts, two differentangles. Some of it will cover like the why of this, Some of it will cover thehow of this. Some of it will cover some...

...of the illustrations I gave like Davegear hearts or my dance says, example, she's going to go and then break thisup into a bunch of different pieces that will flood out over the next monthor two and that's how this works. As I'm still testing out different ideas,I'm getting the most out of the ones that worked and round and round thiscontent. Waterwheel flies right, so hopefully this has been helpful to youif it has then come and connect with me on, linked in my goodness. If you'renot connected with me on linkedin, where have you been? Like come and findme, it's at linkedin dot com slash I. N slash digital marketing dan. We need tohang out, we need to connect, we need to talk and you can see some of theexamples of this whole thing in action. You come see some of those posts andthen watches posts get turned into episodes and then episodes get turnedinto more posts and see how this thing actually works. So come connect with meon linkedin, I love connecting, I love hearing from anybody listening to theshow and then actually having conversations on linkedin, I reply toevery D. M and I love to hear from all...

...of you. So come and find me there andif this show has blessed you, please give it a rating that you feel that itis worth on whatever podcast subscription platform that you'relistening to right now, give it what you think it's worth and only you onlyneed tap the rating, don't you don't have to leave a review if you don'twant to, but if you can tap the three star of the four star, hopefully maybethe five star, that would be fantastic. It really helps the show out a ton.Thank you so much for listening is your buyer at BdP marketer. If soyou should think about sponsoring this podcast Bdb Growth gets downloaded over130,000 times each month and our listeners are marketing decision makers.If it sounds interesting, send Logan and email Logan at Sweet Fish Media dotcom. Yeah, yeah.

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