B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 1761 · 3 months ago

Your Content Delivery Isn't as Good as You Think It Is, with Caitlin Ridge

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this replay episode, Timmy Bauer talks with Caitlin Ridge, Director of Strategic Communications at Formation, about why your content distribution and delivery isn't quite as great as you think it is.

Today on B two B growth, we are sharing a featured conversation from our archive, with over two thousand episodes released. We want to resurface episodes worth another listen. Before we jump in, I just want to say I would love to connect and hear from you on Linkedin. You can search Benji walk over there and that's a great place to also interact with sweet fish and B two B growth. All right, let's jump into today's featured conversation, conversations from the front lines of marketing. This is B two B growth. I'm your host, Timmy Bower, content strategist here at sweet fish, and my guest today is Caitlin ridd she is the director of corporate marketing at Allacadia. CAITLIN, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me to me. I'm excited to be here. Me Too. I'm so excited to talk to you about this topic. It's something that, as a content strategist, I think about all the time and our last conversation we were jamming on the philosophy of we gotta ship content versus genuinely publishing trash, and uh, I remember what sparked it is we were just talking about content strategy and I asked you you know what's an overrated trend in B two B marketing, and you just see so many linkedin videos that are these long ramblings of nothing. So why don't you go ahead and start there? Just describe your inspiration for for why you said this is a problem. Yes, yes, that they are my personal pet peeve. I'll be honest. The walk and talk videos on Linkedin, Um that are rambling, because I'm come from a heavy content side as well. I think about content and content strategy way more often than I probably should, Um, and you do. You're always looking for new channels. Linked in, particularly in B two B, is such a powerful channel and I really when I look at those videos, I just think there's a lost opportunity. Like if your take the time to put something out there first, impressions...

...are everything and if people catch the first video is like a five minute philosophical ramble of a video, that's like straight up your nose and there's wind in the audio, that's not a pleasant like viewing or listening experience for anyone and you've lost the chance to capture this audience. Like I just think that, like when you think about your brand and the awareness of the engagement you're trying to get. I'm not. I'm not touting perfection by any means. Like I do think there needs to be that concept of like get it out there, can make it good enough and go but like there's a level. There's a level between like let me just walk around the block and talk versus let me plan out what I want people to do after this video. How big of a problem do you think this is in the general scare? There's clearly much bigger problems than the world. No, I mean, you know, I think the problem is that the problems that we're not telling people what to do in these videos. Like I'll take a add video that's like two minutes. That's giving me really insightful content, because that that's where I was intending to take this is we see Gary v post these kinds of videos. So I want to get to, you know, what's the difference. But before I get to what's the difference, why do you think the problem is so prevalent? I think it started with a couple of influencers, to be honest, and then everyone was like, oh, they collect a lot of audience doing this different style of video. So I think that it started out not as a problem, but now it's just become this copycat and I'd rather people do the copycat of like let me put out two minutes on something that you could do, like a quick tip, like here's how to do this, here's why you should care about this. But instead they took the idea of like the walk and talk, and that's the part they copied, and they're copying the wrong part of this idea, I think, and personally, another problem is that a lot of people, myself included, we think we have so much to say, like we think, we think our thoughts are so valuable and we think somebody wants to hear US ramble, which is crazy level...

...of pretentiousness. It's a fair point. Yeah, I think. I think most people have something to say. I don't think that we all have something to say every week for ten minutes that's going to drive something. So I think that's where I would ask the people that are doing these kinds of videos to stop and think, like what's your strategy behind this? If your goal is that you have these like couple core topics and this is part of a thought leadership program by all means create the videos do what you need to do get it out there. I think that's one cool thing about the pandemic is that like seeing people in their houses has become so normal that, like you don't need this polished, perfect video studio anymore to produce linked in videos, but you do need to be giving back. Like there I saw this really great sales consultant one where he was talking about like the difference between consultative and transactional selling. It was genius. He was definitely doing it on this porch and the audio was a little rough, but it was one of those where I was like, you made the effort to condense it and give people a strong like what should you do after this video? That I really admire and I think that's the kind of content we should be putting out there. Like what's going to happen after this and as like, for me in corporate marketing, I'm always thinking, like what's the brand perception that we're going to be putting out with this, and that's what I want people to think about. is like ultimately posting on Linkedin, like people now today, or I have just read this, like people are spending like three hours a day on social media. Channels and that's been like a big jump even in the past year, obviously because we're all trapped at home so there's not as much to do. Like think about that. You have so much more capability to capture people's attention right now and build positive perception of whatever brand, like your personal brand, the brand of the company you work for. But that brand is connected to what you're putting out and you do need to take that half a minute to think about like, what are you actually trying to get people to do here? Like, don't just gramble. Give me a concept, give me a call to action, give me something that I walk a from that and...

I'm like, Oh, I now know about this or I'm going to go try this. That was my team. Yeah, when I personally think about content quality, the biggest thing on my mind is the actual quality of the content, not the quality of the delivery. But when it comes to brand perception, that's where you say delivery is important. So this is a complicated question and I'm not sure how to phrase it because I have a few different competing thoughts here. Where one of them is you know that brand perception is important, but I hate when I see companies over prioritize brand perception. What are your thoughts on that? I would totally agree. I think if you're trying to over engineer your brand perception, you probably have pretty bad brand perception at that point. Like can't what do you mean when you say over Engineer Brand Persitionum, like and we'll everyone will know one of these like that when you see something on Linkedin that's this like dodgy, like very B two B old school ask like we pretended this, we've put out this e book today and here's the two things you're going to learn from it, and it's all marketing jargon, where like if you put it in front of your mom, she would have no idea what you were talking about. Like that's the kind of over engineering where like they're so afraid to bring the human element into it that it just sounds like a robot. In your personal opinion, how humble and human do you think you can get with videos and not hurt your brand perception? Oh, that's a great question. Humble, I think that's up to the brand and the person. Honestly, like that's a that's a very degree of like who you are and what you're selling to the world. As far as like the human element, I think it should be more human. I think that's one like as I think about like how brand messaging resonates right now, especially on channels like Linkedin, where like that's where we all go for our business networking, business information gathering. We're human, like we're all seeing this like again, and I feel like covid is just like part of...

...my answer all the time, and it's kind of annoying but very true, because it's the world we live in. Is like you have seen people get more human, and I love that because I think that was one of the like failures, would be two B marketing before this, is that we didn't put the human element into it enough. But from that, like perception, first impressions matter again, like that's psychological, that's just human behavioral, like part of that pieces that, like when we see something, our first instinct, like there's multiple studies that have shown it's really hard to override that first instinct, even if you have all this data and facts proving your first instinct was wrong. We, as humans, our brains, are wired to be like first instinct or the first impression. That's it. We go no further, because that's how our brains help us process all the information that comes in. So that's where I think you need to find that balance of like be human, give me the two minutes worth of awesome information, like give some good audio, like you and I talked about this on the podcast, like you told me not to wear earbuds because the audio is kind of crap when I'm speaking. Like do the little things that will take you five or ten minutes to make it just slightly better. That's that's the baseline that I'm asking people to go to here. That's a great example, because the reality is, if you couldn't find earbuds, you just weren't able to get them and we couldn't reschedule. But I want to make this episode. I would have said, all right, just use your internal microphone on your computer, because at the end of the day, my mindset is let's make the piece of content and then just in our interview we'll try to make it as good as we can and maybe I'll interrupt you a little bit less, because one of the reasons I want you to wear earbuds is so that when I get super excited about something you're saying and I want to interrupt you, I can do that and it doesn't completely throw off the audio, which is what Zoom will do. So I so I might just be taking a little bit of extra care in the actual interview, but I'd still say let's do the interview because at the end of the day, my d is Let's make the piece of...

...content. Do you see that in the B Two b space or do you feel like B Two B is too hesitant about no, let's just make the piece of content. No, I actually think that there has been the past like five years or so, I've seen more and more of that. Posh was like, let's make the content, let's make it as good as we can. I think that's my like back to our original problem that I was discussing. My pet peeve is that, like let's make the piece of content. I think people use that as a way to be sloppy and I think if you spent five minutes, because to your point, like what if I couldn't find this, we could have figured it out with some other option. But you asking me to wear these headphones was a really small request. It really wasn't that hard to do something like that. That's what I'm saying, is that, like you should ship the content. You should make sure that you're seeing that you're the content you're putting out is quality. You shouldn't let like small things detract you from it. But it doesn't mean you should get lazy. Like you're still publishing content, you're still pushing it out to an audience and you're still making impressions on those people. And so that's where I think that like take those five or ten minutes to write that, you know, figure out the best possible version of it, and then go for it. Like how many amazing memes have we all seen of people like dogs in the background, kids running in and interrupting stuff, like the world is okay with seeing the human side now, but like, let me be able to hear you, let me like be able to see your face, non straight up, your nostrils, like they're saamful of little things. We can all do to be slightly more polished and we're still human beings. So so if you were to just outline those or, let's say you at Your Company, how you folks would think about creating content at scale while being human. And you know, when the when the content inspiration strikes, we make the Pisa content and we ship the piece of content. I guess what's Your Plan that you follow? Yeah, I think for me my plan is always like what do we what do we want this piece of content to do? Like I don't ever want to put content out for the sake of putting content out,...

...like that's just random acts of marketing. The step one is your strategic about what do you want the piece of content to do? WHATS NEXT? Is Um so we have what we want to do. What's the tone? Is this serious? Is this funny and lighthearted? Like what's that piece? And then third is let's create the content. So, like those truly are my three steps. Is, like I want to make sure that there's a purpose to it. I want to make sure that the messaging hits, because I do think that's so important in today's content, especially social content, like you're only capturing like a little snippet of people's information as they're scrolling, but sessions on linkedin are increasing like a quarter right now. Like you should not push it out there because there's like a tiny section in the background that looks funky. That's again to my over engineering, like that's way too corporate. But you need to have those three steps of like what's the purpose, what's the tone, and then like let's create it. How much content are you guys at allocadia putting out through the personal brands and profiles of your team? Quite a bit actually. So we on my team are a head of content marketing that's on my team. We have a whole schedule of content from our internal team, so like blog posts, infographics, you know, various videos, things like that that we're publishing in general. We then shared out to the entire organization so that they can put their own spin on it. So for the CS team, it may be that we had a great customer story come out there, sharing how excited they are for the customer they help every day. Sales is then taking that and spinning it and saying, like look, how valuable allocadia is. So we really do encourage our team to share things from their own perspective and we've seen huge engagement increases in that the past three or formats we we have as well. It's one of the biggest if somebody's not doing it everything. There's one thing that we didn't talk about that I'm a big believer in, but I'm curious how it plays into what we're talking...

...about, and that is I am such a believer in the iterative approach to making content and making content good. Um. So I will often, if I have an idea, I'll find some channel that I can just get the idea out and then I'll just iterate on it over time. What's your feeling about that in the context of what we're talking about? I completely agree that iterative is the best bet, because I think otherwise you get stuck in that Rut of like perfection over progress. If you're trying so hard to just get it perfect, you're missing probably like a month of opportunity to get in front of people. Um. So my general philosophy on it is like I want to get something about eight percent. I want us to have nailed, like what are we trying to do? What's the tone? But then let's put it out there, like we've we've been testing a current brand program actually, we had a couple of different ideas about like the verbiage for like what's how do we get people to like move deeper into the funnel? How do we actually get people to engage? So we tested it out on social ads, because social ads are super easy to put out. It's a quick change if we do want to do some of the wording, and we've been a B testing a couple of those factors for the past month and a half, knowing that spring season is going to be big, I know. Well, like it's not in live in person events, but like virtual events for Adobe summit, for there's B two B summit. Like we want to have things nailed by then. So we started the process eight weeks ago to start iterating on things so that we feel really strong by the time April hits. I love that. I love that a lot. Yeah, awesome. Well, Caitlin, this has been a really fun conversation. How can listeners connect with you? You can connect with me on Linkedin, Caitlin Ridge, or come to the alacadia website. Um Allacadia DOT COM. This has been great. Thanks for having me. B Two B growth is brought to you by the team...

...at sweet fish media. Here at sweet fish we produce podcasts for some of the most innovative brands in the world and we help them turn those podcasts into micro videos, linkedin content, blog posts and more. We're on a mission to produce every leader's favorite show. Want more information, visit sweet fish media DOT COM.

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