B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2107 · 11 months ago

The Cheat Code for Hope and Connection in B2B Marketing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, we talk to Jonathan J Mentor, CEO and Founder at Successment.co.

Yeah, Hey everyone welcome back to be to be growth. I'm Olivia Hurley and today I'm joined by Jonathan mentor who is the founder and ceo of Success Mint Bold growth marketing Jonathan. How are you doing today? I'm doing wonderful. Olivia is great to see you again. I'm really excited to be here. Me too. I'm so glad that we get to talk. We have just a really, really exciting discussion up ahead. I think I've learned so much in in my time that I've been chatting with you and I'm excited for our listeners to here. You have to say Before we, we jump in, we're going to talk about your journey into B two B marketing and just a bunch of advice you have and things you've encountered um in your analysis on the, you know, the industry today. But before we do that, can you bring us into your world and talk to us a little bit about what you're doing at Success Mint and why you're doing it. Sure. So Success Mint is a boutique uh, growth marketing agency based in new york. And then Miami, uh, we're a growing team of eight core team members and we have a large bench of freelancers that assist us on larger projects. We focused on minority led and owned enterprise. So most of the startups and scallops in the world of tech and related industries that are moving forward with purpose that are uh, mission led and driven. We're supporting those folks and it's been a record year for us to Success Mint, we've got some really exciting clients and different spaces that are talking about really important things. And we've been around to help amplify their message and help them get organized and really just change the world. And I'm just excited to be alone for the journey. Oh my gosh, that's awesome. So Let's go back. I think 10 years you said, How did you get your start and B2B marketing? Right. So I believe in leading with vulnerability. I believe that it's really important in leadership, especially an industry as flashy as marketing, I think. So, I always start by, you know, speaking my vulnerable truth. So about 10 years ago um I was in a totally different industry, I was in HR and employee benefits and sitting in that seat. It was a privilege because somebody that gave me the opportunity to step into that industry had no formal training and I had no formal training and marketing either. Um what I found was is that my mindset put me in a position for success within that industry. But what I found was is that in HR and an employee benefits. What I loved about it was the people rather than the projects. And I got really excited about promoting the different and the unique ideas within the space, which at the soul is what marketing is. So, I started forming relationships with different vendors and speaking about different projects I was involved in and before I knew it, I realized, oh, I'm marketing myself and I'm marketing my vendors and I'm marketing the projects that were involved in. And that involved uh speaking at some national conferences that involved publishing a few books that involved speaking to the media that involved coaching and mentoring my colleagues within that industry and quickly throughout the industry, I gained a reputation for being a marketer. Mind you, my official title at that time 10 years ago was like account executive at this firm that I was working at. Nothing to do with marketing. So what I did was is I presented a marketing proposal to my line manager at the time and I said, hey, I want to step out of account management and I really like to introduce a marketing leg to the department, you know, I think I've got some really great ideas, I have some data to back it up and I still keep that marketing strategy and plan in my google drive to remind me how far I've come because it was really, it was really mickey mouse our Olivia. It was so funny to look at how I thought about marketing back then as a novice and how...

I think about marketing now. So what happened was it was a turning point because my line manager at the time, she was like, you're nuts, you know, you got these crazy ideas, this is not that kind of industry, we're not creative here where a sales driven, you know, industry and we don't need marketing. So you really knocked the wind out of my sails. So what I did was as I decided to go directly to the Ceo who had an open door policy at the time and I said, hey, I'd love to take you out to lunch. And at the time I was in um I was in new york and I worked in the Westchester office, the Ceo worked in the Manhattan office, took him out to lunch and here I was in my best suit pocket square my briefcase, my printed out marketing plan of 24 slides and I said, the reason I invited you out was because, you know, I'd like to challenge my line manager because I have this really good idea that would bring revenue to our firm and here's my plan and I presented it to him and he was blown away and there was a little bit of blowback because he approached my line manager and he was like, hey, you know, we got this employee who has taken initiative, he's presented this plan, I'll be at mickey mouse our, but it's a plan. You know, that the intention is in the right place. Why haven't I heard about this from you? Why am I hearing about it from him? So it was this thing where a I did not get to do the marketing plan with them be, you know, eventually the, the environment, the environment forced me to rethink where I wanted to be at the time. And what I did was, as I said, okay, I got to spread my wings, I gotta do something else. So the vendors in the industry that I was working with because again, I was working as an HR and play benefits consultancy, Right? So my whole job was vendor management to put solutions together for the end client, whatever. So the relationships that I have with the vendors I approached them and I said, hey, you know, I know that you're trying to penetrate this industry, this is a sales channel for you, etcetera, etcetera. But who understands what it is that you're doing as an HR technology, or um a Bennett Tech technology or an insured tech technology better than me, because I'm the one who has to take it us system with selling it internally, and then I presented to the client. So once I did that, you know, I picked up a couple of gigs and what ended up happening was is I just could not go to sleep at night with as excited as I was to work, I'm telling the story of innovative new technologies in the space. So whatever ended up happening, the firm that I was working with, you know, they gave me the ultimatum, hey we have to part ways because you know where a consultancy and you're trying to do this other thing and so I threw out the peacetime Olivia and that's where success meant was born. And so when I found its success mint back then, it was before the pandemic and again I decided to be vulnerable and bre with myself and I took myself and my six year old daughter, Zora Rose and I relocated from new york city to Miami florida without a plan and I said I'm going to do this market, I'm gonna make this thing work and from there the pandemic hit and I took a very unscientific approach to things and I said, you know what if people are trust at home, that means that they're going to consume a lot more content in the digital space because now they're a captive audience. I don't have to compete with other channels, like they are living on digital and um I approached some Miami based businesses and businesses across the US and business just grew from there and here we are, many years later with um with a very profitable, uh purposeful, impactful agency. I love that mickey mouse our and all. I want to get inside your mind a little bit. 10 years ago, What was the B2B space like for my minorities? Can you speak specifically to part of that? Sure. I think that 10 years ago I don't think that entrepreneurship was such a buzzword, I don't think that it was as glamorous, I don't think that it was as...

...interesting or as even as accessible as it is now with a much more remote brave new world that we're in. So minorities didn't have a lot of visibility and I was in I mean, Olivia to be quite frank, I was in a very old boys industry, it was insurance, it was hr they weren't a lot of people that looked or sounded like me in the industry. And when I say minority again, you know, I believe in leading with vulnerability. I was a minority in the space because not only was I a brown person, I was a person from from a lower economic class, I'm from the L G B. T. Q community, I'm a college drop out. You know, I came from, you know, I didn't come from the Hamptons or I didn't come from, you know, uh you know, the coast of san Jose California, you know, there was a lot of barriers in my mind at the time that when I finally was able to connect with other people, helped me to understand like, oh yeah, like these kind of like mental barriers are shared by myself and with other people as well. The turning point for me in my mind 10 years that well on this 10 year journey was I was able to speak at business insurance magazines, DND leadership conference and I was I was in a room full of you know, white insurance professionals because remember I came from the E. B. Space or whatever. And finally there was a room of people that shared the concern that there was kind of like a talent crisis within that specific industry. And they said we need more diversity of color and thought and religion and gender and ability and age in order to move this industry forward on an innovative, on an innovative path. And my participation there and the way that I really got the crowd up out of their seats with my personal journey. I've carried it with me throughout my entire career into marketing. And it's part of why, you know, I like to empower other minorities and power and minority is a very powerful word, but it's also diluted on the other hand, because minority can mean so many things to different people. And I feel that there is no limit to you feeling like the minority in the room. And when you have to tell your story as a business, especially to other businesses. And you're competing with Um with a hotshot procurement department or you're competing with other marketing resources, internal and external. And, you know, a B2B business plan that, you know, has a specific idea or theory in mind for their marketing strategy you have to penetrate by being the human being first. And I have found that in more recent years especially following the issues surrounding of George Floyd and the way it kind of woke up the nation in terms of brands really starting to examine their D. N. A. Initiative, their multicultural stances. I believe that it's a much more prevalent and poignant topic that brands are attaching numbers and metrics and data and resources to. Whereas before it was kind of like you know we'll we'll get there when we get there or you know we'll hire this woman or this black person for optics and keep everybody happy. It's like now it's like no we we we need to understand their unique point of view anecdotally compare that to data scientifically and this is a more appropriate way to approach new markets. You mentioned shifting your mindset and the barriers that you encountered. Some of them external. Absolutely. And some of them internal in your in your mental space. Can you tell me a little bit about your mindset when you started the impetus for shifting your mindset and where you are now? Yeah, the impetus for for me starting her name is Maria Rose, she's turning six and she's very loud and bossy. So becoming a father for me changed my perspective in terms of where I wanted to be in my career and what lifestyle I wanted to afford her and what experiences and exposures I wanted to get her. So that was the mindset shift on a personal level. I had a lot of barriers when I came into corporate America in general, but even...

...more so in marketing, because I saw so many things that counted against me and I didn't see a lot of people that were successful sitting in the seat where I wanted to be. So what I had to do was like the first thing I did was I read I consumed contents on the topic and I said I need to understand how to be better, I need to understand how to be smarter because I have a, you know, at the time I had a chip on my shoulder, I'm like, they're gonna, you know, they're not going to work with me because I don't have a college degree, they're not going to work with me because I have tattoos, they're not going to work with me because I'm younger, they're not going to work with me because um I have a new york accent, they're not going to work with me and all the knots. I turned them into butts, right, Like it's amazing what can happen when you stop saying the no or can't or whatever and then you turn that into a but or an ant. So I would say I'm brown and I bring a multicultural perspective to the marketing plan. I'm young and I know a little bit more about millennial marketing than they do. I'm LGBT and I know what, I know what it is to walk into a room full of trauma and try to hide it in conversation. So originally it was me kind of overcompensating for all the barriers that I had in my head. But you know, I looked back and then I looked at where I was and I was like, wait a minute. I've spoken to national stages. I get recruited for different positions all the time. I'm working on multimillion dollar businesses. I'm talking to the investors, I'm talking to a board like, no, no, no, no, no, I belong here and I need to look back at the people who are watching me for success because I want to inspire them. So for me it was about shifting the mindset from barriers and seeing opportunities there and these opportunities turned into a very, um, a very successful agency. In fact, one of the things that I present to people in terms of my agency, when I'm positioning, you know, what's so different about your agency success, Mint Actually means the combination of two words, success and commitment. Success plus commitment equals success Mint. So if you're committed to success in your mindset, this is how you're going to move forward as a B two B marketing because it's a tough, very competitive industry. Absolutely. It sounds like so much of overcoming those barriers was seeing the results. And I'm curious did that not only did that bolster your confidence, but it did it bolster other people's confidence in you and give you more opportunities when you're able to say like, you might not see all this other stuff about me that's very important or you might want to overlook me because of this, these things about me. But look at the results. Is that maybe some advice that you would give Yourself back then or anybody trying to start now of like the results are what speaks. Yeah. I think that I think that B2B marketers have a pr problem. No pun intended. Or maybe there is a pun intended, but there's a public relations issue with market is that we do a lot of stuff. It's fluffy. The timelines are so long. You need all of these things, they're all of these processes, We need this lead time, we need to understand, we need to test, we need to and it's just like it's all bullshit Olivia. Like if you have a process and you set goals and you set metrics that ladder up to KPs and you measure each step of the way, then there's nothing ambiguous. There's nothing clandestine about what you're doing as a marketer. So for me, it's yes. Get the results okay. Quantifying them. But also understand different people, like information in a lot of different ways, You know, and you got to speak at people's level because not everybody is ready to be vulnerable. You can have a CMO who literally, you know, they're supposed to be data driven. They're supposed to be scientific. They're supposed to look at spreadsheets and graphs and numbers all...

...day, but really what they want, they want to be presented a slide show. They want pictures, they want to see, you know, a cartoon character taking them through the journey of their marketing funnel and they will connect with you and this will allow them to connect to you in a much better way. So it's less about all of the things that you're supposed to be and the results that you can bring to the table and how you present that information. One of the things that was a turning point with success, Mint was being able to build our proprietary process for two reasons. Number one, if I can unpack a discipline as complicated and sophisticated as a marketing strategy and help you understand it in a minute or two, then I always turn around and I say, you know, if you can understand what we do at success meant that easily imagine what I can do for the story you're trying to tell your target market, imagine the businesses that you're trying to penetrate with these enormous boards of decision makers to decide if they want to hire or engage your services. They have to you know you have to educate that there's so many steps let's break it down. And the four step process that we use that success meant to kind of transfer this information is called boom. It's a four step process and each step of the game has a goal and an action and boom stands for begin operate. Obviate and maximize so in step one our goal is to develop a targeted data and for marketing and distribution strategy. The action that we take to to make that happen is we do a webinar content audit. Um We do a competitive analysis we do by our segmentation is and we do a market research report to inform strategy in step number to operate, we develop an optimized, we develop optimized content, we activate distribution channels and then we we amplify brand influence the action that we take to support. This goal is to deploy strategic content. We develop an influencer outreach strategy and we will find any automation technologies in step number three. Obviate. The goal is amplified brand influence to generate a high volume of quality new business leads. What do we do to get there? We take action by deploying paid advertisements, placing earns media and activating brand allies and influencers to share content. In the final step, maximize the goal is to identify and improve the most effective marketing tactics that lead to success and the action that we take to get there is we analyze campaigns, we refined tactics and we increase lead exposure. Those are the four steps boom began operating via to maximize and Olivia. You're gonna remember this when you're going to sleep tonight with your peanut butter and jelly in your glass of milk. It's easy to remember. And we, it's kind of a flywheel very similar to, you know, the big guys help spot. They use a flywheel and success in our flywheel is boom. Boom is an iterative process that we apply to marketing strategy day over day, week over week, month over month, quarter over quarter. And it all ladders up to the kind of KPI is that a CMO or CEO wants to see? It's a very simple kind of like master dashboard, they are sitting in the driver's seat. They see everything that they need to see. But if something is broken or something doesn't add up, we have the data to back it up and we can always go back to step for maximize and decide as a team cooperatively. Hey, this is broken, This is what we hypothesize is going to fix the marketing strategy. How about we, you know, we partner with each other and decide, hey, is this right for your specific business? I've seen a super targeted, I've seen super targeted marketing results in clarity on what it is that we're working on because again, like marketing means so many things to so many different people. Like marketing can mean, um, you know, sales enablement marketing can mean content development, marketing can mean lee generation marketing can mean brand equity and awareness marketing can mean pr or a combination of some of the two or you know, but everybody like everybody thinks about marketing differently. So if you don't first identify what are the, I don't care about your marketing goals. What are...

...your business goals? What are your revenue goals? What are your investors breathing down your back about? What are your mentors telling you that you need to improve upon within your operation? These are the things I want to know because then I will back into how can marketing help those things because marketing cannot cure all of the problems, right? We can treat symptoms but we can't cure a disease unless we know what's causing it within the marketing strategy. So if it's an operational thing again, based on my experience being a human facing person, being vulnerable, I'll say that sounds like an HR issue or that sounds like an L. N. D. Issue or that maybe that sounds like an operational issue. You know that's not our specialty. But you know this is what we've seen from our other clients that will help to accelerate what's going on in marketing. And if a marketer goes in, you know, with their deck and where a legion agency and we'll do your S Ceo. And it's just like you're you're not, you're leading with what, you know and what you've done is like a template for success rather than listening to what the client needs, tuning into what their goals are and attacking them very strategically josh. What do you think is the most irritating thing for me to be buyers right now, anne Logan, I love talking to you about this. You know that the number one challenge right now is that many customer facing teams in the B two B space right now are forcing their potential buyers too, by the way that they want to sell, buyers don't want to buy that way. Right now, they want to, by the way they want to buy. We need to enable those buyers, we call this buyer enablement at sales reach. We need to enable those buyers to make better decisions quicker in a comfortable environment that's more personalized for them to move forward with that process. Dude, that's awesome. I couldn't agree more since I've been using sales reach in my own sales process. It's allowed me to really enable the buyer to move more quickly in really two ways. One, they don't have to download a bunch of attachments. I can send them to one page with the proposal case studies different resources because let's face it, the proposal is just one part of the sales conversation and probably only one sales enablement piece of content that you're sending. So it makes it easier on them. And then the other thing is, you know, we're selling to our champions and then we're making them have to re give our pitch to the entire buying committee. So one thing I do is put a custom 2 to 3 minute video on the top of my sales reach page that says, hey, here's all the resources, tie it back to the conversation. Here's the proposal. Let me know if you have any questions and it allows me to give a little bit of kind of a mini pitch to the rest of the buying committee, introduce myself, which helps me build trust and credibility and helps the buyer not have to repeat the entire pitch from scratch. So if anybody is looking to do the same thing in their own sales process, I'd highly suggest they reach out to you and the team over at sales, reach for anybody listening. Just go to sales reach dot IO to talk to josh and the team. Absolutely. And what a way to build trust too. I think everybody wants to be listen to him to be seen holistically. Even as a, like a representative of a company to, I'm curious to jump onto another track here in your tenure in the B two B marketing world and especially in your, in your tenure as the founder of success Mint, how have you seen the landscape change for my minorities and B two B marketing? That's a great question because the challenges are always going to be there, right. I think that the challenge is always gonna be there. But the big difference, at least that I see personally is that for me, the biggest cheat sheet in life, if there is anything by way of a shortcut in life or career or marketing, it's to have somebody that you can rely on that you trust that's sitting in the seat where you want to be and they're willing to share their journey with you in a very vulnerable and purposeful way. And 10 years ago there were not latin X and gay and black and brown and poor folks...

...that are leading enormous global enterprise marketing operations. Now you see a few more of them, we need to be doing better. Okay. It's a start, you know, we want to see more women leading, we want to see more black and brown leading, we want to see more LGBT leading, we want to hear more about at least I because I'm just nosy Olivia, I want to hear those folks that came from Detroit michigan or Bronx new york or opa locka Miami or uh you know Oakland California, I want to hear those stories, you know don't conceal them because People need to know that there's diversity of thoughts within the world of B2B marketing, you know, and one of the things that I see that's slowly shifting is that people are having braver conversations and marketing and it just connects you to people. And I know that, you know, there's a school of marketing that it's all data, it's a science, but there's something to be said about connecting with someone who looks like you and things like you and can relate to you because at the end of the day, B two B marketing or B two B supply chain or you know, shoe salesman, you want to relate to people and you have a larger opportunity to relate to people if they share something in their journey that they can connect with to you. And I think that in business people are becoming braver and especially in a category as formal as B two B marketing is becoming less formal. You know, people used to show up in suits and ties to zooms and meetings and now people are showing up in t shirts with, you know, a man bun To me, you know, I'm just, you know, shouting myself out here. Um and people are still like, you know what? Let me not judge this person, They're here for a reason, OK? They've compelled me to get to this point, let me allow them to share their expertise. And as soon as you share the expertise, as soon as you give them that ah ha moment, the doubt sort of melts away and you can connect with them and you can really start delivering them results for. And instead of coming from a place where it's the, you know, us versus them. It's like the client is trying to find holes in our marketing theory and, you know, we're trying to, you know, hold on to the client. It's like, no, this is collaborative. You know, we're an agency and yes, there are those who would consider me, you know, a thought leader within marketing and all of that, but I'm the first to admit, I like to be the stupidest guy in the room. I give all the credit to my team and I asked all of the questions I've gotten off of um pictures with prospects or I've come in to troubleshoot existing client projects and ask the silliest question. You know, there was a communication issue. I wonder why do you have wifi messed up in your house or something? Like we sent you three emails. I'm just trying to figure out what's going and you know, it will diffuse the situation. Everybody laughs and then you have a vulnerable moment, you find out what the problem is, you get rid of it and then it's just like and then my team are coming. I cannot believe you asked them that Jonathan and I'm like, well if I don't, we're either going to lose the client, we're going to continue tip someone around the thing, sneaking in the bushes and my feet are too soft for eggshells. So let's let's rock and roll. Let's move through this difficult thing and move on to the fun thing. I love that. I love that you called it a cheat code two. And the way that I've kind of been turning this over in my head as you're talking is like the cheat code for hope and connection and B two B marketing is mentorship. It's it's there's no, I mean you can do it a million other ways Olivia, but it's gonna take you longer, it's gonna be harder and you're gonna make more mistakes and there's nothing wrong with mistakes. But if you're a perfectionist like me you don't like to make them if you can avoid them. So you just have to I mean the mentors are gonna know they're gonna warn you about the pitfalls, they can provide you with the templates, they can make the introductions to the resources, they can tell you the software that works,...

...they can tell you the agencies that are real and then the agencies that are mickey mouse, they can tell you who's really making a living off of up works and who's really working with me to be enterprise. They can open all of the doors if you're vulnerable with them. And if they have the time to do it because nothing feels better than seeing someone else that you have advised to thrive. As a matter of fact Olivia, one of my New Year's resolutions and this is the middle of the year and I'm still talking about it because it was so impactful for me was, you know, aside from all the things, you know, I want to vote. You know, I want to have, you know, five, I want to get this because I live in Miami. So every day I, you know, I look at the ocean. Yeah, I live in a nice, okay, so maybe we'll share a boat. So what you write, what, you know, I want to vote, you know, I want to grow the agency by X amount. I want to evangelize the mission of these three things. I want to change that, you know, but one of them, the one that stood out, the one that's relevant to this specific question is Is one of my new year's resolutions was I wanted to mentor six young kings in marketing And I want them to be from the background that I came from. Because you asked me 10 years ago, but you didn't ask me 15 years ago Olivia 15 years ago. Olivia, you would have gotten up in the morning going down to Starbucks and I would have been the guy on the other end of the counter handing you your um what is it your mocha frappuccino. Okay. That was me. And then, you know, five years later, you know, I penetrated different but I love to take people from the different walks of life or that marketing specialists that he's really somebody's assistant but he knows the Ceo he just doesn't have the confidence to say no, no. I know S Ceo and I can be more than this marketing specialist or if I see, you know, a young woman entering uh marketing and they know what the salary bracket is, and they're negotiating a new contract as you know, as a consultant, as an employee, whatever it is, you know, they don't have the confidence to say no, no, this is 120,000, that's what I'm worth, not 75 I'm 100 and 20,000, That's that's who I am, and that's what I bring to the table, and I'm not afraid to walk away. Walk your truth and don't shrink yourself in order to get by because I did that. And it slowed me down for a long time in this 10 year journey that we're talking about, because the more I try to conceal the tattoos, you know, I'd be in a meeting and I'm up to here and I'm like, oh my god, I can barely breathe and I'm sweating. And they're like, are you okay? And I'm like, I want some water or you know, I would talk more slowly to conceal my accent or I would wear my hair a certain way or um you know, I would, you know, I would tap dance around the issue of college. No, no. Now I leave with these things and it earns me enormous respect within the industry, I have to work much harder. Okay? And when somebody walks into the room judgy and they say, oh well, you know, I have this war in N. B. A. And you know, I worked with IBM and Microsoft and JetBlue on their marketing strategy. I'm like, yeah, congratulations, I made an impact for 100,000 people this year. The companies that I work with, they might not be the size of IBM. But you know what? There combating inequality between genders. They're combating um the barriers that face Children in economically depressed communities to access education. They are taking on difficult conversations about leadership and racism in the workplace. That's not the kind of work that IBM and JetBlue does. So congratulations on your M. B. A. Congratulations for having gone to um that I believe college. Congratulations for having grown up in. I don't know the stamford Connecticut. I didn't and I'm still making an impact and we can walk in this room together and still add value as pierce. Yeah. Very cool. I think I think it's it really you know, even in in the like teaspoon of a way that I can relate to you in these things. Yeah. Because I think it would be totally, totally false for me to try...

...and relate to these things more than is appropriate. But in the teaspoon of the way that I can, I think that the thing that in my experience kind of makes me like rest easy is knowing like we can both be players in the room when we can both have success and there's no like, success is not a limited resource and and you totally are speaking that and I I love that. So, one thing I'm curious about it is who you work with now, like who are the people who are, you know, the the profile of the people who are coming to success Mint and and that you're just helping make those waves and those, those impacts that you were talking about. Sure. So one of the first things that we look at before edit anything is mission alignment. Okay, the mission of success Mint is purpose. So if you're not leading with a purpose, if you're not, if you're not an organization who has pledged to allocate real resources, real dollars, real teams to diversity and inclusion. Um, if you're not leading with awareness and empowerment and mindfulness in addition to contributing to the economy, if you're not committed to rooting for the underdog of your business does not impact people positively and it simply turns a profit, you're just not the client for us. You know, we have partners who are happy. You know, if you want to sell spatulas, great, we have a great, you know, sister agency that will help you sell spatulas. You know, if you want to, you know, sell tobacco awesome, we won't do tobacco, but you know, these people will. Um, so that's the first thing that we look at. The second thing that we look at is we really like to walk our work and we will evaluate your leadership team, will take a look on linkedin and we'll take a look at your website and we want to see the women and we want to see black men and we want to see LGBT representation and we want to ask you questions about who it is that's contributing to the thought process behind the marketing. These are the two biggest criteria that we have a success mint. And although yeah, Olivia, we have pissed some people off by telling them we're not going to work with you for this reason. And we have turned down major business. But in return, what we get is we get to work with people that we love. We get to work with people that share our ideals. And we get to work with people that are really changing the world and saying that we are a party to this change that you're making. Uh we have one client that we're working with that is working on improving okay, intersectional gender inequity. And I found that so interesting because at the same time that we're growing their mission and changing the world, our team is always being educated on what this means and how impactful it is and how nuanced it is. And although, you know, your mental real estate is only but so large, you know, you always want an opportunity to learn about things. But that's what I like to do. I'm voracious in the way that I like to learn. So when we're looking at clients, we look at, First of all, how is your leadership represented? Tell me a little bit about your journey, what changes are you trying to make? And then from there we'll decide, Hey, can we help you, you know, based on the goals that you have, are they realistic? You want to do a million next year or excuse me in a million additional next year or you want to do 100 million or you're seeking to investment or you want to get on, you know, you want to sit down with Oprah, you know, whatever it is, you know, let us know what your goals are and will definitely apply our boom process. So what is that you're trying to accomplish? And one will quickly unravel what the barriers are, what the resources are that we need and the timelines. And if you're cool with that, we're cool with you. And we always say, let's rock and roll, I love that. Let's rock and roll. So Jonathan, what tactics do you deploy that success Mint to bring about the results that you've been seeing, right? So first things first we apply boom to identify opportunities, identify channels and identify tactics but the lanes that success and plays within that. We're...

...really good at our strategy, digital marketing, contents, Creative and Web. Um, a lot of clients come to us for a lot of different things and there are breakout services and projects that we handle. Um, but we always like try to lead with strategy because I feel as though when clients come to us and they tell us what they need and what they want, that's typically a sign that it's not the best client because there's a million different ways to slice of pie. And if you come to me and say we have a lead generation problem, we need more blogs. It's like, wait, let's diagnose the issue first. And in order to do that, we need to come up with a strategy because you wouldn't go to a doctor and say, hey, my knee hurts. Maybe I need lung surgery. It's like what, like, you know, you have to trust your expert to diagnose and treat whatever it is that your B two B marketing need is. So we leave with strategy. Then we do, you know, we go into the content generation piece, we form the com strategy. How are we approaching different conversations, where are folks having these conversations? What are the questions that come up? Let's make answer content that um that C. R. O. Conversion rate uh conversion rate optimized. And then we'll take that content and then we'll break it down into the asset classes. What channels are we deploying on? Make sure that they all work, put an evergreen campaign together. And then we start looking at, you know, day to day, week to week, quarter over quarter and really approaching different topics. And then that goes into the creative because the way that we approach it is, hey, once you have your strategy, once you have your um your contents pillars, once you have your deployment channels, it's very easy for creative to interpret these kind of things. And that's a combination of knowing what assets go on, what channel and a combination of making those things pop and really, really concise because I'm going to be marketing. You know, it's not as quote unquote fun as like e commerce or B two C. You can't get as cheeky, you can't have as much fun as like Wendy's twitter for example, you might look a little funny, but you know, there are ways to connect with the audience because at the end of the day, these are, yeah, they're B two B marketers, but there are also people, they want to laugh during their work day or think during their work day or be challenged during their work day. Um and then from there anything that's web related. So um you know top of funnel ceo, middle of funnel S. E. O. Sales enablement pieces when you're getting down to the bottom of the funnel, that kind of things and you know and then we tie a bow on it depending on what the resources are internally and what they need from us. So success meant we separate strategy from deployment depending on the size of the team because the strategy, you know based on boom because we run everything through boom boom is like our our central processing unit, right? We run everything through boom. We come up with a strategy, we make recommendations in terms of tactics and then it's you know, we have to sit down with the client and what resources can you commit internally? What resources do you want to or you know, how big of this operation do you want success meant to take over in terms of deployment? We marry those two together and then we make the brand famous and then they changed the world Jonathan. One of the things I admire so much about your work ethic and your mode of operation is how thorough you are. And I think that's so obvious in the processes in boom in all that. And I'm curious if you were to apply that, that thoroughness to Maybe like three tips, you would offer someone who is wanting similar opportunities that you've had, who's, who's hoping to land? Where you land. What would you say man? These are the three things and here's how to do them, wow, that's a great question. The first thing and the most important is give yourself permission, give yourself permission. And whenever that little...

...voice of doubt in the back of your head says, well, Gary V didn't do it this way, Neil Patel didn't do it that way, Jonathan J mentor did have mentioned that at the B two B growth podcast. You know, give yourself permission to understand that none of the people that you listen to or consume content from. None of us are uniforms. You know, maybe some of us had more advantages than the other but give yourself permission and realize that there's nothing stopping you from moving forward other than the things in your head. And when you hear the things in your head always turned the but or they can't wear the note into the why and the end and the but always change those things and it will change the internal narrative that you have for yourself. I don't have a college degree but my boss is a jerk but you know, I'm a black woman in this industry surrounded by all these white guys and I have a distinct advantage because now we're going multicultural. Like I broke my ideas to the table, like always change the narrative in your head and give yourself permission to approach the market because remember, I don't care what anybody tells. Your marketing is just as much about science and data as it is about being unique and creative and you have to have a unique combination of both. And your unique cocktail of marketing is what's gonna make you special and no supervisor or terrible clients or any of the other barriers are. And they don't let that take away from giving yourself permission to understand that you have a unique perspective. Just know that you got to hold yourself accountable to the results of your unique perspective. Number two, get yourself mentors and respect them and listen. And if you're, if you're a chatterbox like me almost hold your hand over your mouth and stop and take notes because this person, if you choose the mentor correctly, should be a person. You see yourself becoming they're sitting where you want them, where you would like to be, they have the resources that you're looking for, they have the relationships that you're looking for, they have the expertise that you're looking for and this person might look like an overnight success to you, but I guarantee you it took them years to get there of mistakes, trials, tribulations, people telling them no people telling them you can't, people telling them you're crazy, people telling them this is not the way that things are done and they made it to a place where you're sitting there like wow, this person is freaking awesome, understands that they have more to offer you buy you listening and asking the right questions than it is for you to vent to them or complaint to them or I mean and this might be because I have folks like that to mostly my daughter show color and I'll just sit there complaining to her but your mentor should be your sounding board and whenever you come across the barrier they're always going to help you to entangle because they've been where you are before and if they have it shouldn't be a mentor. Third would be to educate and prepare yourself because again for me stepping into marketing without formal marketing training and Olivia, listen, I am definitely not one to brag, I don't think I brag this entire interview, but I've been able to be a party to generating hundreds of millions of dollars in new business for the clients that success mint without any formal training. Okay, so that's just one fun fact that I'll give about Jonathan personally and successful as an agency um against all the wealth of knowledge that I've tried to provide your listeners Olivia during this conversation. But that was not magic. That was me saying to myself, like I have all of these barriers in front of me and I still got to make it to point B where these other guys are, they've been there for longer, they've been there and they're stronger, they've been there and they have more resources. I have this chip on my shoulder telling me you can't do it because you're not them and I was that guy, but I'm not Gary. The, I'll never be Gary. I'm john...

...you know, don't allow those things to become the internal conversation that you have with yourself. If there is not something that you know, you have two options, you can either learn it or you can partner with somebody that loves it and then you'll always have that resource covered. For example, one of my biggest areas of opportunity with successful is I cannot don't put me in front of Martek. I don't like systems, I don't like coding, asked me to do any of these things and I will be like, I don't know, but you know what, I gotta have year over here and I've got, I knelt over there and we can get this done like learn how to, to give yourself permission to lean into the things that you're really, really good at, learn about the things that you're not so good at or you don't love and learn how to, you know if you're just starting out, learn how to partner with somebody that doesn't really really well or if you're an agency owner listening to this, give yourself permission please to let go of these things, you are an owner of a business, you are not an individual contributor, it's okay to say to a client literally in a conversation because they run their own business to, I don't know how to do that Greg but you know who does on my team is Javier here so I will connect you with Xavier and I will join the conversation to make sure all the dots connect. If I had to give three pieces of advice, it would be those three. Number one, give yourself permission Olivia number to find yourself a sounding board of great mentors And # three learn about the things that challenge you. Oh my gosh, well if I were to give a summary of your summary, it would be hope confidence and a dose of reality in PDB marketing. That is, that is so actionable. And I think that's, I think my favorite part of this is just how hopeful the spaces and how hopeful you are about, about what people can achieve. Oh my gosh, I have so much to think through. I'm so glad we got to talk and I'm and I'm really excited for our, for our listeners to um come along with us on this journey Jonathan. How can people learn more about success Mint and where can they go to connect with you and learn more about you? Um Well, success Mint dot C O is the best place not successful dot com. You'll end up on some, I don't know some domain but successful dot Ceo is probably the best Olivia. There's actually a video that I'll send you. It's about a minute and a half that describes boom. Um, so if you're not a person who likes to peruse through websites and you'd rather just get the abridged version of today's conversation, I think that the boom overview video is going to work really, really well or you know, hey, google, you know, google my name. See if I'm full of crap or not, you know, and you can decide for yourself if I'm worth listening to. I love that. Oh my gosh, well can people find you anywhere on social media or anything like that if they want to reach out to learn more. Yeah, absolutely. So all my handles are at Jonathan, J. Mentor jail, N A T H A N, the letter J and then mentor M E N T O R. That's my real last name. It's not like a moniker so that's on twitter and instagram I think you can find me on facebook the same way um, and then on linkedin, Jonathan J mentor, I love literally I am the most approachable person. Your message is not going to sit in my inbox for like you know seven days if you reach out and you're like you are the mentor there but or you know I want you to work with my company on market. Like I will answer like I'm literally sitting at my socialist so you can always reach me oh my gosh, well I am so so glad you joined me today on GDP growth and I'm so glad we know each other. Yeah, yeah. Is the decision maker for your product or service of BB marketer. Are you looking to reach those buyers through the medium of podcasting? Considered becoming a co host of GDP growth. This show is consistently ranked as a top...

...100 podcast in the marketing category of apple podcasts, And the show gets more than 130,000 downloads each month. We've already done the work of building the audience so you can focus on delivering incredible content to our listeners if you're interested, email Logan at Sweet Fish Media dot com.

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