B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast
B2B Growth: Your Daily B2B Marketing Podcast

Episode 2107 · 4 months ago

The Cheat Code for Hope and Connection in B2B Marketing

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode, we talk to Jonathan J Mentor, CEO and Founder at Successment.co.

Yeah, Hey everyone welcome back to be to begrowth. I'm Olivia Hurley and today I'm joined by Jonathan mentor who is thefounder and ceo of Success Mint Bold growth marketing Jonathan. How are youdoing today? I'm doing wonderful. Olivia is great to see you again. I'mreally excited to be here. Me too. I'm so glad that we get to talk. We havejust a really, really exciting discussion up ahead. I think I'velearned so much in in my time that I've been chatting with you and I'm excitedfor our listeners to here. You have to say Before we, we jump in, we're goingto talk about your journey into B two B marketing and just a bunch of adviceyou have and things you've encountered um in your analysis on the, you know,the industry today. But before we do that, can you bring us into your worldand talk to us a little bit about what you're doing at Success Mint and whyyou're doing it. Sure. So Success Mint is a boutique uh, growth marketingagency based in new york. And then Miami, uh, we're a growing team ofeight core team members and we have a large bench of freelancers that assistus on larger projects. We focused on minority led and owned enterprise. Somost of the startups and scallops in the world of tech and relatedindustries that are moving forward with purpose that are uh, mission led anddriven. We're supporting those folks and it's been a record year for us toSuccess Mint, we've got some really exciting clients and different spacesthat are talking about really important things. And we've been around to helpamplify their message and help them get organized and really just change theworld. And I'm just excited to be alone for the journey. Oh my gosh, that'sawesome. So Let's go back. I think 10 years you said, How did you get yourstart and B2B marketing? Right. So I believe in leading with vulnerability.I believe that it's really important in leadership, especially an industry asflashy as marketing, I think. So, I always start by, you know, speaking myvulnerable truth. So about 10 years ago um I was in a totally differentindustry, I was in HR and employee benefits and sitting in that seat. Itwas a privilege because somebody that gave me the opportunity to step intothat industry had no formal training and I had no formal training andmarketing either. Um what I found was is that my mindset put me in a positionfor success within that industry. But what I found was is that in HR and anemployee benefits. What I loved about it was the people rather than theprojects. And I got really excited about promoting the different and theunique ideas within the space, which at the soul is what marketing is. So, Istarted forming relationships with different vendors and speaking aboutdifferent projects I was involved in and before I knew it, I realized, oh,I'm marketing myself and I'm marketing my vendors and I'm marketing theprojects that were involved in. And that involved uh speaking at somenational conferences that involved publishing a few books that involvedspeaking to the media that involved coaching and mentoring my colleagueswithin that industry and quickly throughout the industry, I gained areputation for being a marketer. Mind you, my official title at that time 10years ago was like account executive at this firm that I was working at.Nothing to do with marketing. So what I did was is I presented a marketingproposal to my line manager at the time and I said, hey, I want to step out ofaccount management and I really like to introduce a marketing leg to thedepartment, you know, I think I've got some really great ideas, I have somedata to back it up and I still keep that marketing strategy and plan in mygoogle drive to remind me how far I've come because it was really, it wasreally mickey mouse our Olivia. It was so funny to look at how I thought aboutmarketing back then as a novice and how...

I think about marketing now. So whathappened was it was a turning point because my line manager at the time,she was like, you're nuts, you know, you got these crazy ideas, this is notthat kind of industry, we're not creative here where a sales driven, youknow, industry and we don't need marketing. So you really knocked thewind out of my sails. So what I did was as I decided to go directly to the Ceowho had an open door policy at the time and I said, hey, I'd love to take youout to lunch. And at the time I was in um I was in new york and I worked inthe Westchester office, the Ceo worked in the Manhattan office, took him outto lunch and here I was in my best suit pocket square my briefcase, my printedout marketing plan of 24 slides and I said, the reason I invited you out wasbecause, you know, I'd like to challenge my line manager because Ihave this really good idea that would bring revenue to our firm and here's myplan and I presented it to him and he was blown away and there was a littlebit of blowback because he approached my line manager and he was like, hey,you know, we got this employee who has taken initiative, he's presented thisplan, I'll be at mickey mouse our, but it's a plan. You know, that theintention is in the right place. Why haven't I heard about this from you?Why am I hearing about it from him? So it was this thing where a I did not getto do the marketing plan with them be, you know, eventually the, theenvironment, the environment forced me to rethinkwhere I wanted to be at the time. And what I did was, as I said, okay, I gotto spread my wings, I gotta do something else. So the vendors in theindustry that I was working with because again, I was working as an HRand play benefits consultancy, Right? So my whole job was vendor managementto put solutions together for the end client, whatever. So the relationshipsthat I have with the vendors I approached them and I said, hey, youknow, I know that you're trying to penetrate this industry, this is asales channel for you, etcetera, etcetera. But who understands what itis that you're doing as an HR technology, or um a Bennett Techtechnology or an insured tech technology better than me, because I'mthe one who has to take it us system with selling it internally, and then Ipresented to the client. So once I did that, you know, I picked up a couple ofgigs and what ended up happening was is I just could not go to sleep at nightwith as excited as I was to work, I'm telling the story of innovative newtechnologies in the space. So whatever ended up happening, the firm that I wasworking with, you know, they gave me the ultimatum, hey we have to part waysbecause you know where a consultancy and you're trying to do this otherthing and so I threw out the peacetime Olivia and that's where success meantwas born. And so when I found its success mint back then, it was beforethe pandemic and again I decided to be vulnerable and bre with myself and Itook myself and my six year old daughter, Zora Rose and I relocatedfrom new york city to Miami florida without a plan and I said I'm going todo this market, I'm gonna make this thing work and from there the pandemichit and I took a very unscientific approach to things and I said, you knowwhat if people are trust at home, that means that they're going to consume alot more content in the digital space because now they're a captive audience.I don't have to compete with other channels, like they are living ondigital and um I approached some Miami based businesses and businesses acrossthe US and business just grew from there and here we are, many years laterwith um with a very profitable, uh purposeful, impactful agency. I lovethat mickey mouse our and all. I want to get inside your mind a little bit.10 years ago, What was the B2B space like for my minorities? Can you speakspecifically to part of that? Sure. I think that 10 years ago I don't thinkthat entrepreneurship was such a buzzword, I don't think that it was asglamorous, I don't think that it was as...

...interesting or as even as accessible asit is now with a much more remote brave new world that we're in. So minoritiesdidn't have a lot of visibility and I was in I mean, Olivia to be quite frank,I was in a very old boys industry, it was insurance, it was hr they weren't alot of people that looked or sounded like me in the industry. And when I sayminority again, you know, I believe in leading with vulnerability. I was aminority in the space because not only was I a brown person, I was a personfrom from a lower economic class, I'm from the L G B. T. Q community, I'm acollege drop out. You know, I came from, you know, I didn't come from theHamptons or I didn't come from, you know, uh you know, the coast of sanJose California, you know, there was a lot of barriers in my mind at the timethat when I finally was able to connect with other people, helped me tounderstand like, oh yeah, like these kind of like mental barriers are sharedby myself and with other people as well. The turning point for me in my mind 10years that well on this 10 year journey was I was able to speak at businessinsurance magazines, DND leadership conference and I was I was in a roomfull of you know, white insurance professionals because remember I camefrom the E. B. Space or whatever. And finally there was a room of people thatshared the concern that there was kind of like a talent crisis within thatspecific industry. And they said we need more diversity of color andthought and religion and gender and ability and age in order to move thisindustry forward on an innovative, on an innovative path. And myparticipation there and the way that I really got the crowd up out of theirseats with my personal journey. I've carried it with me throughout my entirecareer into marketing. And it's part of why, you know, I like to empower otherminorities and power and minority is a very powerful word, but it's alsodiluted on the other hand, because minority can mean so many things todifferent people. And I feel that there is no limit to you feeling like theminority in the room. And when you have to tell your story as a business,especially to other businesses. And you're competing with Um with a hotshotprocurement department or you're competing with other marketingresources, internal and external. And, you know, a B2B business plan that, youknow, has a specific idea or theory in mind for their marketing strategy youhave to penetrate by being the human being first. And I have found that inmore recent years especially following the issues surrounding of George Floydand the way it kind of woke up the nation in terms of brands reallystarting to examine their D. N. A. Initiative, their multicultural stances.I believe that it's a much more prevalent and poignant topic thatbrands are attaching numbers and metrics and data and resources to.Whereas before it was kind of like you know we'll we'll get there when we getthere or you know we'll hire this woman or this black person for optics andkeep everybody happy. It's like now it's like no we we we need tounderstand their unique point of view anecdotally compare that to datascientifically and this is a more appropriate way to approach new markets.You mentioned shifting your mindset and the barriers that you encountered. Someof them external. Absolutely. And some of them internal in your in your mentalspace. Can you tell me a little bit about your mindset when you started theimpetus for shifting your mindset and where you are now? Yeah, the impetusfor for me starting her name is Maria Rose, she's turning six and she's veryloud and bossy. So becoming a father for me changed my perspective in termsof where I wanted to be in my career and what lifestyle I wanted to affordher and what experiences and exposures I wanted to get her. So that was themindset shift on a personal level. I had a lot of barriers when I came intocorporate America in general, but even...

...more so in marketing, because I saw somany things that counted against me and I didn't see a lot of people that weresuccessful sitting in the seat where I wanted to be. So what I had to do waslike the first thing I did was I read I consumed contents on the topic and Isaid I need to understand how to be better, I need to understand how to besmarter because I have a, you know, at the time I had a chip on my shoulder,I'm like, they're gonna, you know, they're not going to work with mebecause I don't have a college degree, they're not going to work with mebecause I have tattoos, they're not going to work with me because I'myounger, they're not going to work with me because um I have a new york accent,they're not going to work with me and all the knots. I turned them into butts,right, Like it's amazing what can happen when you stop saying the no orcan't or whatever and then you turn that into a but or an ant. So I wouldsay I'm brown and I bring a multicultural perspective to themarketing plan. I'm young and I know a little bit more about millennialmarketing than they do. I'm LGBT and I know what, I know what it is to walkinto a room full of trauma and try to hide it in conversation. So originallyit was me kind of overcompensating for all the barriers that I had in my head.But you know, I looked back and then I looked at where I was and I was like,wait a minute. I've spoken to national stages. I get recruited for differentpositions all the time. I'm working on multimillion dollar businesses. I'mtalking to the investors, I'm talking to a board like, no, no, no, no, no, Ibelong here and I need to look back at the people who are watching me forsuccess because I want to inspire them. So for me it was about shifting themindset from barriers and seeing opportunities there and theseopportunities turned into a very, um, a very successful agency. In fact, one ofthe things that I present to people in terms of my agency, when I'mpositioning, you know, what's so different about your agency success,Mint Actually means the combination of two words, success and commitment.Success plus commitment equals success Mint. So if you're committed to successin your mindset, this is how you're going to move forward as a B two Bmarketing because it's a tough, very competitive industry. Absolutely. Itsounds like so much of overcoming those barriers was seeing the results. AndI'm curious did that not only did that bolster your confidence, but it did itbolster other people's confidence in you and give you more opportunitieswhen you're able to say like, you might not see all this other stuff about methat's very important or you might want to overlook me because of this, thesethings about me. But look at the results. Is that maybe some advice thatyou would give Yourself back then or anybody trying to start now of like theresults are what speaks. Yeah. I think that I think that B2B marketers have apr problem. No pun intended. Or maybe there is a pun intended, but there's apublic relations issue with market is that we do a lot of stuff. It's fluffy.The timelines are so long. You need all of these things, they're all of theseprocesses, We need this lead time, we need to understand, we need to test, weneed to and it's just like it's all bullshit Olivia. Like if you have aprocess and you set goals and you set metrics that ladder up to KPs and youmeasure each step of the way, then there's nothing ambiguous. There'snothing clandestine about what you're doing as a marketer. So for me, it'syes. Get the results okay. Quantifying them. But also understand differentpeople, like information in a lot of different ways, You know, and you gotto speak at people's level because not everybody is ready to be vulnerable.You can have a CMO who literally, you know, they're supposed to be datadriven. They're supposed to be scientific. They're supposed to look atspreadsheets and graphs and numbers all...

...day, but really what they want, theywant to be presented a slide show. They want pictures, they want to see, youknow, a cartoon character taking them through the journey of their marketingfunnel and they will connect with you and this will allow them to connect toyou in a much better way. So it's less about all of the things that you'resupposed to be and the results that you can bring to the table and how youpresent that information. One of the things that was a turning point withsuccess, Mint was being able to build our proprietary process for two reasons.Number one, if I can unpack a discipline as complicated andsophisticated as a marketing strategy and help you understand it in a minuteor two, then I always turn around and I say, you know, if you can understandwhat we do at success meant that easily imagine what I can do for the storyyou're trying to tell your target market, imagine the businesses thatyou're trying to penetrate with these enormous boards of decision makers todecide if they want to hire or engage your services. They have to you knowyou have to educate that there's so many steps let's break it down. And thefour step process that we use that success meant to kind of transfer thisinformation is called boom. It's a four step process and each step of the gamehas a goal and an action and boom stands for begin operate. Obviate andmaximize so in step one our goal is to develop a targeted data and formarketing and distribution strategy. The action that we take to to make thathappen is we do a webinar content audit. Um We do a competitive analysis we doby our segmentation is and we do a market research report to informstrategy in step number to operate, we develop an optimized, we developoptimized content, we activate distribution channels and then we weamplify brand influence the action that we take to support. This goal is todeploy strategic content. We develop an influencer outreach strategy and wewill find any automation technologies in step number three. Obviate. The goalis amplified brand influence to generate a high volume of quality newbusiness leads. What do we do to get there? We take action by deploying paidadvertisements, placing earns media and activating brand allies and influencersto share content. In the final step, maximize the goal is to identify andimprove the most effective marketing tactics that lead to success and theaction that we take to get there is we analyze campaigns, we refined tacticsand we increase lead exposure. Those are the four steps boom began operatingvia to maximize and Olivia. You're gonna remember this when you're goingto sleep tonight with your peanut butter and jelly in your glass of milk.It's easy to remember. And we, it's kind of a flywheel very similar to, youknow, the big guys help spot. They use a flywheel and success in our flywheelis boom. Boom is an iterative process that we apply to marketing strategy dayover day, week over week, month over month, quarter over quarter. And it allladders up to the kind of KPI is that a CMO or CEO wants to see? It's a verysimple kind of like master dashboard, they are sitting in the driver's seat.They see everything that they need to see. But if something is broken orsomething doesn't add up, we have the data to back it up and we can always goback to step for maximize and decide as a team cooperatively. Hey, this isbroken, This is what we hypothesize is going to fix the marketing strategy.How about we, you know, we partner with each other and decide, hey, is thisright for your specific business? I've seen a super targeted, I've seen supertargeted marketing results in clarity on what it is that we're working onbecause again, like marketing means so many things to so many different people.Like marketing can mean, um, you know, sales enablement marketing can meancontent development, marketing can mean lee generation marketing can mean brandequity and awareness marketing can mean pr or a combination of some of the twoor you know, but everybody like everybody thinks about marketingdifferently. So if you don't first identify what are the, I don't careabout your marketing goals. What are...

...your business goals? What are yourrevenue goals? What are your investors breathing down your back about? Whatare your mentors telling you that you need to improve upon within youroperation? These are the things I want to know because then I will back intohow can marketing help those things because marketing cannot cure all ofthe problems, right? We can treat symptoms but we can't cure a diseaseunless we know what's causing it within the marketing strategy. So if it's anoperational thing again, based on my experience being a human facing person,being vulnerable, I'll say that sounds like an HR issue or that sounds like anL. N. D. Issue or that maybe that sounds like an operational issue. Youknow that's not our specialty. But you know this is what we've seen from ourother clients that will help to accelerate what's going on in marketing.And if a marketer goes in, you know, with their deck and where a legionagency and we'll do your S Ceo. And it's just like you're you're not,you're leading with what, you know and what you've done is like a template forsuccess rather than listening to what the client needs, tuning into whattheir goals are and attacking them very strategically josh. What do you thinkis the most irritating thing for me to be buyers right now, anne Logan, I lovetalking to you about this. You know that the number one challenge right nowis that many customer facing teams in the B two B space right now are forcingtheir potential buyers too, by the way that they want to sell, buyers don'twant to buy that way. Right now, they want to, by the way they want to buy.We need to enable those buyers, we call this buyer enablement at sales reach.We need to enable those buyers to make better decisions quicker in acomfortable environment that's more personalized for them to move forwardwith that process. Dude, that's awesome. I couldn't agree more since I've beenusing sales reach in my own sales process. It's allowed me to reallyenable the buyer to move more quickly in really two ways. One, they don'thave to download a bunch of attachments. I can send them to one page with theproposal case studies different resources because let's face it, theproposal is just one part of the sales conversation and probably only onesales enablement piece of content that you're sending. So it makes it easieron them. And then the other thing is, you know, we're selling to ourchampions and then we're making them have to re give our pitch to the entirebuying committee. So one thing I do is put a custom 2 to 3 minute video on thetop of my sales reach page that says, hey, here's all the resources, tie itback to the conversation. Here's the proposal. Let me know if you have anyquestions and it allows me to give a little bit of kind of a mini pitch tothe rest of the buying committee, introduce myself, which helps me buildtrust and credibility and helps the buyer not have to repeat the entirepitch from scratch. So if anybody is looking to do the same thing in theirown sales process, I'd highly suggest they reach out to you and the team overat sales, reach for anybody listening. Just go to sales reach dot IO to talkto josh and the team. Absolutely. And what a way to build trust too. I thinkeverybody wants to be listen to him to be seen holistically. Even as a, like arepresentative of a company to, I'm curious to jump onto another track herein your tenure in the B two B marketing world and especially in your, in yourtenure as the founder of success Mint, how have you seen the landscape changefor my minorities and B two B marketing? That's a great question because thechallenges are always going to be there, right. I think that the challenge isalways gonna be there. But the big difference, at least that I seepersonally is that for me, the biggest cheat sheet in life, if there isanything by way of a shortcut in life or career or marketing, it's to havesomebody that you can rely on that you trust that's sitting in the seat whereyou want to be and they're willing to share their journey with you in a veryvulnerable and purposeful way. And 10 years ago there were not latin X andgay and black and brown and poor folks...

...that are leading enormous globalenterprise marketing operations. Now you see a few more of them, we need tobe doing better. Okay. It's a start, you know, we want to see more womenleading, we want to see more black and brown leading, we want to see more LGBTleading, we want to hear more about at least I because I'm just nosy Olivia, Iwant to hear those folks that came from Detroit michigan or Bronx new york oropa locka Miami or uh you know Oakland California, I want to hear thosestories, you know don't conceal them because People need to know thatthere's diversity of thoughts within the world of B2B marketing, you know,and one of the things that I see that's slowly shifting is that people arehaving braver conversations and marketing and it just connects you topeople. And I know that, you know, there's a school of marketing that it'sall data, it's a science, but there's something to be said about connectingwith someone who looks like you and things like you and can relate to youbecause at the end of the day, B two B marketing or B two B supply chain oryou know, shoe salesman, you want to relate to people and you have a largeropportunity to relate to people if they share something in their journey thatthey can connect with to you. And I think that in business people arebecoming braver and especially in a category as formal as B two B marketingis becoming less formal. You know, people used to show up in suits andties to zooms and meetings and now people are showing up in t shirts with,you know, a man bun To me, you know, I'm just, you know, shouting myself outhere. Um and people are still like, you know what? Let me not judge this person,They're here for a reason, OK? They've compelled me to get to this point, letme allow them to share their expertise. And as soon as you share the expertise,as soon as you give them that ah ha moment, the doubt sort of melts awayand you can connect with them and you can really start delivering themresults for. And instead of coming from a place where it's the, you know, usversus them. It's like the client is trying to find holes in our marketingtheory and, you know, we're trying to, you know, hold on to the client. It'slike, no, this is collaborative. You know, we're an agency and yes, thereare those who would consider me, you know, a thought leader within marketingand all of that, but I'm the first to admit, I like to be the stupidest guyin the room. I give all the credit to my team and I asked all of thequestions I've gotten off of um pictures with prospects or I've come into troubleshoot existing client projects and ask the silliest question.You know, there was a communication issue. I wonder why do you have wifimessed up in your house or something? Like we sent you three emails. I'm justtrying to figure out what's going and you know, it will diffuse the situation.Everybody laughs and then you have a vulnerable moment, you find out whatthe problem is, you get rid of it and then it's just like and then my teamare coming. I cannot believe you asked them that Jonathan and I'm like, wellif I don't, we're either going to lose the client, we're going to continue tipsomeone around the thing, sneaking in the bushes and my feet are too soft foreggshells. So let's let's rock and roll. Let's move through this difficult thingand move on to the fun thing. I love that. I love that you called it a cheatcode two. And the way that I've kind of been turning this over in my head asyou're talking is like the cheat code for hope and connection and B two Bmarketing is mentorship. It's it's there's no, I mean you can do it amillion other ways Olivia, but it's gonna take you longer, it's gonna beharder and you're gonna make more mistakes and there's nothing wrong withmistakes. But if you're a perfectionist like me you don't like to make them ifyou can avoid them. So you just have to I mean the mentors are gonna knowthey're gonna warn you about the pitfalls, they can provide you with thetemplates, they can make the introductions to the resources, theycan tell you the software that works,...

...they can tell you the agencies that arereal and then the agencies that are mickey mouse, they can tell you who'sreally making a living off of up works and who's really working with me to beenterprise. They can open all of the doors if you're vulnerable with them.And if they have the time to do it because nothing feels better thanseeing someone else that you have advised to thrive. As a matter of factOlivia, one of my New Year's resolutions and this is the middle ofthe year and I'm still talking about it because it was so impactful for me was,you know, aside from all the things, you know, I want to vote. You know, Iwant to have, you know, five, I want to get this because I live in Miami. Soevery day I, you know, I look at the ocean. Yeah, I live in a nice, okay, somaybe we'll share a boat. So what you write, what, you know, I want to vote,you know, I want to grow the agency by X amount. I want to evangelize themission of these three things. I want to change that, you know, but one ofthem, the one that stood out, the one that's relevant to this specificquestion is Is one of my new year's resolutions was I wanted to mentor sixyoung kings in marketing And I want them to be from the background that Icame from. Because you asked me 10 years ago, but you didn't ask me 15years ago Olivia 15 years ago. Olivia, you would have gotten up in the morninggoing down to Starbucks and I would have been the guy on the other end ofthe counter handing you your um what is it your mocha frappuccino. Okay. Thatwas me. And then, you know, five years later, you know, I penetrated differentbut I love to take people from the different walks of life or thatmarketing specialists that he's really somebody's assistant but he knows theCeo he just doesn't have the confidence to say no, no. I know S Ceo and I canbe more than this marketing specialist or if I see, you know, a young womanentering uh marketing and they know what the salary bracket is, and they'renegotiating a new contract as you know, as a consultant, as an employee,whatever it is, you know, they don't have the confidence to say no, no, thisis 120,000, that's what I'm worth, not 75 I'm 100 and 20,000, That's that'swho I am, and that's what I bring to the table, and I'm not afraid to walkaway. Walk your truth and don't shrink yourself in order to get by because Idid that. And it slowed me down for a long time in this 10 year journey thatwe're talking about, because the more I try to conceal the tattoos, you know,I'd be in a meeting and I'm up to here and I'm like, oh my god, I can barelybreathe and I'm sweating. And they're like, are you okay? And I'm like, Iwant some water or you know, I would talk more slowly to conceal my accentor I would wear my hair a certain way or um you know, I would, you know, Iwould tap dance around the issue of college. No, no. Now I leave with thesethings and it earns me enormous respect within the industry, I have to workmuch harder. Okay? And when somebody walks into the room judgy and they say,oh well, you know, I have this war in N. B. A. And you know, I worked with IBMand Microsoft and JetBlue on their marketing strategy. I'm like, yeah,congratulations, I made an impact for 100,000 people this year. The companiesthat I work with, they might not be the size of IBM. But you know what? Therecombating inequality between genders. They're combating um the barriers thatface Children in economically depressed communities to access education. Theyare taking on difficult conversations about leadership and racism in theworkplace. That's not the kind of work that IBM and JetBlue does. Socongratulations on your M. B. A. Congratulations for having gone to umthat I believe college. Congratulations for having grown up in. I don't knowthe stamford Connecticut. I didn't and I'm still making an impact and we canwalk in this room together and still add value as pierce. Yeah. Very cool. Ithink I think it's it really you know, even in in the like teaspoon of a waythat I can relate to you in these things. Yeah. Because I think it wouldbe totally, totally false for me to try...

...and relate to these things more than isappropriate. But in the teaspoon of the way that I can, I think that the thingthat in my experience kind of makes me like rest easy is knowing like we canboth be players in the room when we can both have success and there's no like,success is not a limited resource and and you totally are speaking that and II love that. So, one thing I'm curious about it is who you work with now, likewho are the people who are, you know, the the profile of the people who arecoming to success Mint and and that you're just helping make those wavesand those, those impacts that you were talking about. Sure. So one of thefirst things that we look at before edit anything is mission alignment.Okay, the mission of success Mint is purpose. So if you're not leading witha purpose, if you're not, if you're not an organization who has pledged toallocate real resources, real dollars, real teams to diversity and inclusion.Um, if you're not leading with awareness and empowerment andmindfulness in addition to contributing to the economy, if you're not committedto rooting for the underdog of your business does not impact peoplepositively and it simply turns a profit, you're just not the client for us. Youknow, we have partners who are happy. You know, if you want to sell spatulas,great, we have a great, you know, sister agency that will help you sellspatulas. You know, if you want to, you know, sell tobacco awesome, we won't dotobacco, but you know, these people will. Um, so that's the first thingthat we look at. The second thing that we look at is we really like to walkour work and we will evaluate your leadership team, will take a look onlinkedin and we'll take a look at your website and we want to see the womenand we want to see black men and we want to see LGBT representation and wewant to ask you questions about who it is that's contributing to the thoughtprocess behind the marketing. These are the two biggest criteria that we have asuccess mint. And although yeah, Olivia, we have pissed some people off bytelling them we're not going to work with you for this reason. And we haveturned down major business. But in return, what we get is we get to workwith people that we love. We get to work with people that share our ideals.And we get to work with people that are really changing the world and sayingthat we are a party to this change that you're making. Uh we have one clientthat we're working with that is working on improving okay, intersectionalgender inequity. And I found that so interesting because at the same timethat we're growing their mission and changing the world, our team is alwaysbeing educated on what this means and how impactful it is and how nuanced itis. And although, you know, your mental real estate is only but so large, youknow, you always want an opportunity to learn about things. But that's what Ilike to do. I'm voracious in the way that I like to learn. So when we'relooking at clients, we look at, First of all, how is your leadershiprepresented? Tell me a little bit about your journey, what changes are youtrying to make? And then from there we'll decide, Hey, can we help you, youknow, based on the goals that you have, are they realistic? You want to do amillion next year or excuse me in a million additional next year or youwant to do 100 million or you're seeking to investment or you want toget on, you know, you want to sit down with Oprah, you know, whatever it is,you know, let us know what your goals are and will definitely apply our boomprocess. So what is that you're trying to accomplish? And one will quicklyunravel what the barriers are, what the resources are that we need and thetimelines. And if you're cool with that, we're cool with you. And we always say,let's rock and roll, I love that. Let's rock and roll. So Jonathan, whattactics do you deploy that success Mint to bring about the results that you'vebeen seeing, right? So first things first we apply boom to identifyopportunities, identify channels and identify tactics but the lanes thatsuccess and plays within that. We're...

...really good at our strategy, digitalmarketing, contents, Creative and Web. Um, a lot of clients come to us for alot of different things and there are breakout services and projects that wehandle. Um, but we always like try to lead with strategy because I feel asthough when clients come to us and they tell us what they need and what theywant, that's typically a sign that it's not the best client because there's amillion different ways to slice of pie. And if you come to me and say we have alead generation problem, we need more blogs. It's like, wait, let's diagnosethe issue first. And in order to do that, we need to come up with astrategy because you wouldn't go to a doctor and say, hey, my knee hurts.Maybe I need lung surgery. It's like what, like, you know, you have to trustyour expert to diagnose and treat whatever it is that your B two Bmarketing need is. So we leave with strategy. Then we do, you know, we gointo the content generation piece, we form the com strategy. How are weapproaching different conversations, where are folks having theseconversations? What are the questions that come up? Let's make answer contentthat um that C. R. O. Conversion rate uh conversion rate optimized. And thenwe'll take that content and then we'll break it down into the asset classes.What channels are we deploying on? Make sure that they all work, put anevergreen campaign together. And then we start looking at, you know, day today, week to week, quarter over quarter and really approaching different topics.And then that goes into the creative because the way that we approach it is,hey, once you have your strategy, once you have your um your contents pillars,once you have your deployment channels, it's very easy for creative tointerpret these kind of things. And that's a combination of knowing whatassets go on, what channel and a combination of making those things popand really, really concise because I'm going to be marketing. You know, it'snot as quote unquote fun as like e commerce or B two C. You can't get ascheeky, you can't have as much fun as like Wendy's twitter for example, youmight look a little funny, but you know, there are ways to connect with theaudience because at the end of the day, these are, yeah, they're B two Bmarketers, but there are also people, they want to laugh during their workday or think during their work day or be challenged during their work day. Umand then from there anything that's web related. So um you know top of funnelceo, middle of funnel S. E. O. Sales enablement pieces when you're gettingdown to the bottom of the funnel, that kind of things and you know and then wetie a bow on it depending on what the resources are internally and what theyneed from us. So success meant we separate strategy from deploymentdepending on the size of the team because the strategy, you know based onboom because we run everything through boom boom is like our our centralprocessing unit, right? We run everything through boom. We come upwith a strategy, we make recommendations in terms of tactics andthen it's you know, we have to sit down with the client and what resources canyou commit internally? What resources do you want to or you know, how big ofthis operation do you want success meant to take over in terms ofdeployment? We marry those two together and then we make the brand famous andthen they changed the world Jonathan. One of the things I admire so muchabout your work ethic and your mode of operation is how thorough you are. AndI think that's so obvious in the processes in boom in all that. And I'mcurious if you were to apply that, that thoroughness to Maybe like three tips,you would offer someone who is wanting similar opportunities that you've had,who's, who's hoping to land? Where you land. What would you say man? These arethe three things and here's how to do them, wow, that's a great question. Thefirst thing and the most important is give yourself permission, give yourselfpermission. And whenever that little...

...voice of doubt in the back of your headsays, well, Gary V didn't do it this way, Neil Patel didn't do it that way,Jonathan J mentor did have mentioned that at the B two B growth podcast. Youknow, give yourself permission to understand that none of the people thatyou listen to or consume content from. None of us are uniforms. You know,maybe some of us had more advantages than the other but give yourselfpermission and realize that there's nothing stopping you from movingforward other than the things in your head. And when you hear the things inyour head always turned the but or they can't wear the note into the why andthe end and the but always change those things and it will change the internalnarrative that you have for yourself. I don't have a college degree but my bossis a jerk but you know, I'm a black woman in this industry surrounded byall these white guys and I have a distinct advantage because now we'regoing multicultural. Like I broke my ideas to the table, like always changethe narrative in your head and give yourself permission to approach themarket because remember, I don't care what anybody tells. Your marketing isjust as much about science and data as it is about being unique and creativeand you have to have a unique combination of both. And your uniquecocktail of marketing is what's gonna make you special and no supervisor orterrible clients or any of the other barriers are. And they don't let thattake away from giving yourself permission to understand that you havea unique perspective. Just know that you got to hold yourself accountable tothe results of your unique perspective. Number two, get yourself mentors andrespect them and listen. And if you're, if you're a chatterbox like me almosthold your hand over your mouth and stop and take notes because this person, ifyou choose the mentor correctly, should be a person. You see yourself becomingthey're sitting where you want them, where you would like to be, they havethe resources that you're looking for, they have the relationships that you'relooking for, they have the expertise that you're looking for and this personmight look like an overnight success to you, but I guarantee you it took themyears to get there of mistakes, trials, tribulations, people telling them nopeople telling them you can't, people telling them you're crazy, peopletelling them this is not the way that things are done and they made it to aplace where you're sitting there like wow, this person is freaking awesome,understands that they have more to offer you buy you listening and askingthe right questions than it is for you to vent to them or complaint to them orI mean and this might be because I have folks like that to mostly my daughtershow color and I'll just sit there complaining to her but your mentorshould be your sounding board and whenever you come across the barrierthey're always going to help you to entangle because they've been where youare before and if they have it shouldn't be a mentor. Third would beto educate and prepare yourself because again for me stepping into marketingwithout formal marketing training and Olivia, listen, I am definitely not oneto brag, I don't think I brag this entire interview, but I've been able tobe a party to generating hundreds of millions of dollars in new business forthe clients that success mint without any formal training. Okay, so that'sjust one fun fact that I'll give about Jonathan personally and successful asan agency um against all the wealth of knowledge that I've tried to provideyour listeners Olivia during this conversation. But that was not magic.That was me saying to myself, like I have all of these barriers in front ofme and I still got to make it to point B where these other guys are, they'vebeen there for longer, they've been there and they're stronger, they'vebeen there and they have more resources. I have this chip on my shoulder tellingme you can't do it because you're not them and I was that guy, but I'm notGary. The, I'll never be Gary. I'm john...

...you know, don't allow those things tobecome the internal conversation that you have with yourself. If there is notsomething that you know, you have two options, you can either learn it or youcan partner with somebody that loves it and then you'll always have thatresource covered. For example, one of my biggest areas of opportunity withsuccessful is I cannot don't put me in front of Martek. I don't like systems,I don't like coding, asked me to do any of these things and I will be like, Idon't know, but you know what, I gotta have year over here and I've got, Iknelt over there and we can get this done like learn how to, to giveyourself permission to lean into the things that you're really, really goodat, learn about the things that you're not so good at or you don't love andlearn how to, you know if you're just starting out, learn how to partner withsomebody that doesn't really really well or if you're an agency ownerlistening to this, give yourself permission please to let go of thesethings, you are an owner of a business, you are not an individual contributor,it's okay to say to a client literally in a conversation because they runtheir own business to, I don't know how to do that Greg but you know who doeson my team is Javier here so I will connect you with Xavier and I will jointhe conversation to make sure all the dots connect. If I had to give threepieces of advice, it would be those three. Number one, give yourselfpermission Olivia number to find yourself a sounding board of greatmentors And # three learn about the things that challenge you. Oh my gosh,well if I were to give a summary of your summary, it would be hopeconfidence and a dose of reality in PDB marketing. That is, that is soactionable. And I think that's, I think my favorite part of this is just howhopeful the spaces and how hopeful you are about, about what people canachieve. Oh my gosh, I have so much to think through. I'm so glad we got totalk and I'm and I'm really excited for our, for our listeners to um come alongwith us on this journey Jonathan. How can people learn more about successMint and where can they go to connect with you and learn more about you? UmWell, success Mint dot C O is the best place not successful dot com. You'llend up on some, I don't know some domain but successful dot Ceo isprobably the best Olivia. There's actually a video that I'll send you.It's about a minute and a half that describes boom. Um, so if you're not aperson who likes to peruse through websites and you'd rather just get theabridged version of today's conversation, I think that the boomoverview video is going to work really, really well or you know, hey, google,you know, google my name. See if I'm full of crap or not, you know, and youcan decide for yourself if I'm worth listening to. I love that. Oh my gosh,well can people find you anywhere on social media or anything like that ifthey want to reach out to learn more. Yeah, absolutely. So all my handles areat Jonathan, J. Mentor jail, N A T H A N, the letter J and then mentor M E N TO R. That's my real last name. It's not like a moniker so that's on twitter andinstagram I think you can find me on facebook the same way um, and then onlinkedin, Jonathan J mentor, I love literally I am the most approachableperson. Your message is not going to sit in my inbox for like you know sevendays if you reach out and you're like you are the mentor there but or youknow I want you to work with my company on market. Like I will answer like I'mliterally sitting at my socialist so you can always reach me oh my gosh,well I am so so glad you joined me today on GDP growth and I'm so glad weknow each other. Yeah, yeah. Is the decision maker for your productor service of BB marketer. Are you looking to reach those buyers throughthe medium of podcasting? Considered becoming a co host of GDP growth. Thisshow is consistently ranked as a top...

...100 podcast in the marketing categoryof apple podcasts, And the show gets more than 130,000 downloads each month.We've already done the work of building the audience so you can focus ondelivering incredible content to our listeners if you're interested, emailLogan at Sweet Fish Media dot com.

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