796: 4 Tips To Scaling Up By Expert Outsourcers w/ Bryan Miles

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Bryan Miles, Co-Founder and CEO at Belay.

Click here to connect with this guest on LinkedIn.

Looking for a guaranteed way to create content that resonates with your audience? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients and let them choose the topic of the interview, because if your ideal clients care about the topic, there's a good chance the rest of your audience will care about it too. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to be tob growth, a daily podcast for B TOB leaders. We've interviewed names you've probably heard before, like Gary Vander truck and Simon Senek, but you've probably never heard from the majority of our guests. That's because the bulk of our interviews aren't with professional speakers and authors. Most of our guests are in the trenches leading sales and marketing teams. They're implementing strategy, they're experimenting with Pactics, they're building the fastest growing BB companies in the world. My name is James Carberry. I'm the founder of sweet fish media, a podcast agency for B Tob Brands, and I'm also one of the CO hosts of this show. When we're not interviewing sales and marketing leaders, you'll hear stories from behind the scenes of our own business. Will share the ups and downs of our journey as we attempt to take over the world. Just getting well? Maybe let's get into the show. All right, we're excited to welcome to the show Brian Miles, the CEO and Co founder of Ballet. Brian has had a lot of success growing that company and helping others to grow their companies. So excited to talk with you today, Brian Rex. Thank you for the opporunity to be here. Yeah, absolutely. Why do you give us a quick introduction to what you do and can your background and how I get started with ballet? Sure, so, back in two thousand and ten, my wife and I left some really nice jobs to start a virtual assistant company and over time since two thousand and ten, or over eight years now, we've grown to add two more other services, virtual bookkeeping and virtual webmaster services. All of our folks are based here in the United States. Currently we have a team of over seven hundred people that represent our clients, mostly the United States and Canada, and I absolutely...

...love what I do. I love helping clients get the relief they need. From an administrative background, we do all the things that no one likes to do. All that unsexy stuff and we do provide a lot of relief to worn out leaders with really great people. So it's a joy to do what I get to do every day. Well, I think what's really fun about what you do is that you don't just see the way you're going your company, you see the way others are going their company and whether it's people in House or people that they're outsourcing to through your company. I'm sure you see a lot of those interaction. I think we're going to benefit from some of your learnings today, so let's dive in here. The first principle that you kind of want to walk through was this idea of saying no more than saying yes. Can you break that down force give an idea what you mean? You Bet so. I'm a sales get heart. I love sales because I think just that the best sales people in the world. All they do is simply people. But the problem is sales people will often times, and sales organizations want to say yes a lot because they have a quota or they got numbers, the meter so forth. But if you're looking at long term, a viable brand, you want to say no more than you say yes. And what that means you to say no. You've got to actually know who your ideal prospect is and to do that you've really got to work hard with your marketing team to really identify WHO's that ideal target meeting. Is it a certain particular industry? Is a certain size of revenue? Is it is certain Avatar of a particular prospect, and really knowing those things so that you can say no to a lot of things that would distract or pull away from your brand and say yes to those that are the more obvious picked for your for building your business. That's great. And and do you have any advice for those? Because obviously, at the top levels, let's say you're talking to a founder of a small start up, this is easy. You can explain to them. Look, you've got to have a vision, you got to stick to it and and they're they've got their hand on every marketing asset and every sales opportunity and they're very involved as those organizations grow. How do you how do you suggest that they communicate that in terms of maybe their policies or...

...the way they talk to their employees, about being willing to say no more than saying yes. But think it's hard. You know, if you have to go back to a bigger reason for why you would say no and remind employees, especially frontline employees, of why we would say no to particular prospects or to certain revenue and ultimately, well, I've found is true organization, and where I've coached this another organizations are friends that have businesses. When they've said no on a consistent basis to say yes to the right things, their businesses actually grown faster. But it's very comer intuitive. So it's important that of special frontline employees or folks are mid level managers, that you're articulating the real why for why we would say no to particular revenue set and really go after that, which wouldn't enhance your brand. And that's, you know, it's just something that's learned over time that you've really frankly, got to continue to say. They are, you know, communicate on. Yeah, that's great, that makes complete sense. Now as you're growing that organization, you're trying to communicate these things. Ultimately, you can't own everything, you can't be responsible or touch every sales opportunity, every marketing asset and you suggest something unique as far as delegation that you look at delegation and different like than most people who just delegate tasks. You want to break that down? Yeah, you know, I learned this early on when we started our organization, that I just made the assumption that we had hired adults and that adults would do the job. And so for us, if they are adults in which we hired, then we should be able to delegate a result to them and not the task, because if there are adults and there may be more qualified than I am, then they'll probably get to the result quicker and better and they'll know the task to do. Now, we obviously provide resources and we're there for them if they need to beat something up to get the result. But what we found is an employee knits through a heart to result way better than they do fifty five tasks and they take greater ownership and they know the result that's expected of them. So for us we want to we want a team...

...full of people that results oriented up and down the organization in ballet so that we can execute like crazy. But it really just starts with them. Communicate it. Look, here's the result, I trust you with and we'll work backwards into the task and you'll figure all that out because you're an adult and you're awesome at what you do. But really we're going to celebrate the result with you. It sounds like you have kind of a running theme here of everyone understanding what the ultimate goal is, and you know this is kind of deviating here, but is there a way that you guys do that in your organization that you've seen successful in others? Well, I've seen it successful in other organizations. I'll tell you how. We've seen it become very portable inside our organization and very pervasive. Is this? We've basically said that the results in your area or your role, they really roll up to our mission, and our mission, while incredibly important to us, it really hooks into the mission in the vision, which is really for simply for ballet. It's that our vision is to help others achieve their vision. Now that sounds so simple. Look at our services, of what we provide. We're helping others execute on what they're trying to accomplish inside their organization. So those results that day to day they're achieving, or weekly or poorly whatever, ultimately prop up our mission, but also the vision. What we're trying to accomplish it delay. Yeah, that makes total sound months and a good leader, and in a really good leader, not to interrupted. Just a good leader, will never lose sight of that and constantly articulated. Today's growth story is about Lilliard Insurance Agency. The biggest challenge for one of their B tob sales agents was finding contact information for businesses that fit his target profile. He was running out of time to meet his monthly sales goal, so he turned to simple Internet searches. Too often, information he found was old and unreliable. He was spending too much valuable selling time looking for email addresses and phone numbers that turned out...

...to be inaccurate and unusable anyway. The Rep Sam Hoover, heard about sales genie from his manager and that's when everything changed. Sam started using sales genie's powerful database access to build targeted lists and get the contact information he needed to work new leads. He was able to profile his best customers to find prospects that look just like them. He even US sales gene to find ways to reach them with direct mail, email and online marketing campaigns. Sam immediately increased his monthly sales production by two hundred percent. Can Sales Genie. Hope you drive similar sales results. Probably head over to sales GENIECOM BE TOB to get a demo and a free customer analysis. All right, let's get back into the show. Well, and then that comes back to a point that you made before we hit record here about out sharing the why more often than the other details. Right, there's the what, the how, the when. How important is that for that leadership to continually be communicating that? And then does it relate back to how you talk to customers? For sure. I think in particular the why inside your organization, with your employees, your team, the why trump's the what, the win the how every time, because when you're not around, if they know the why, they know how to fill in the blank, but if they don't know the why, they don't know the destination they're supposed to arrive at. So they can't do the other things very well. And a poor leader does that. A poor leader tells them everything but doesn't give them the great why or the or the destination. A good leader, a great leader over time, will say this is why, this is important, this is why I'm asking you to do this, this is why you're on this call. This is why you're on this project whatever. So that the why, the big why, is there when you're not around and and I think that you could even, especially from the client management or account management standpoint, you can also articulate the why to your clients as well. Say Hey, this is why this is important globally and this is what we're marching to. We want to make sure that we're in alignment...

...with what your why is, with our why, so that we which we're arriving at the same place together. Yeah, I love that. It's funny. I'm taking notes here for myself and hopefully the listeners are as well, for their business, but also for my personal life. I've got three little kids and holy cow, what an important principle. Communicating that why. I like you. Look, this is why we want you to do these things, and then ultimately helps to teach them a greater principle. That's great. Yeah, I meet a lot of leaders that I'm I'm really frankly surprised that when you ask them like where they're heading, they're only looking out just a couple days or couple weeks or a couple months. They're not. They're not aiming at a particular deep why that's out there. You know, the problem with that is you're not going to straight line towards it. You know, you're kind of weaving in and out and Zigzag and you know. And instead you need to put a huge why out there for where you're headed and then you can you can go into straight as line of possible to get there. Yeah, that's fantastic. Now, because you said it's not always a straight line. Things are changing. You've got to adapt. You've got a figure. You know, this principle of like look, we know where we are today, we know where we want to go, but it's not always a clean path. They're things are always changing. How do you, guys in particular, communicate that change to your employees, for example? We just, you know, it's Best I can. I just remind every employee that works for ballet that changes a constant. If you want a significant set of stability, then go work for a fortune five hundred and you may find it. They're or not. For us, we are growing organization, we're scaling up and we've come from the days of start up and bootstrap to where we are today with budgets and teams and so forth. But the reality is. Change is always been part of our business and for the right reasons. We don't change for the sake of change, we change because we would be better with our services. We want to enhance the experience for our clients and, for the really frankly, for those who work for us as well. So we want them to embrace it, so much so that one of our core values inside of ballet is what we call vision, and it's just real simple,...

...and we tie that off to we refused to accept the status quote. So, for an organization that refuses to accept the status quo, what does that mean? We are all about change for the right reasons. So I think that, and I think that's true really of even a nonprofit or for profit. They just change is inevitable if you want to stay in business long term and you want to succeed. So I think that the more that you could help your employees really embrace change versus see this is Oh, another thing or another initues we have to get through, but no, this is really why we succeed and how we grow, then I think they'll start to appreciate change all the more. Yeah, that makes sense and if you had to guess, and it's I'm putting on spy here with this question. What percentage of the change that happens in your organization is it comes from kind of the ground up, from those employees Daytoday, realizing that there's something that could be done better, and what percentage it's like top down? Ay, as a CEO and Co founder, you know that we need to be improving these figures. Is there a split somewhere there? Yeah, I'd say it's probably thirty percent, I'm from from the bottom up, and probably seventy percent from the bottom down, and a lot of that is, you know, they're not necessarily they may have ideas that, I think, impact change for our business and but the key leaders in our business the ones that are out there in the market. They're here with the market saying should be the ones beating that up internally to say should we do this? Should we change? Should we add this? Should we delete this? You know that those are the things that are worth while the leadership team. But we do, you know and it and with that they too in our side. In Our business we've gone from being a small start up to now and medium sized corporation. We do want the ideas where our frontline employees are touching our clients every day. They're coming to US and saying, Hey, we think we should do this, what about this idea? We welcome that and sometimes those things are significant in the impact. Big Change for the right reasons in our business. So I think early on when you're start up, you know there's kind of a couple key or court leaders and their kind of this is what we do and we pivot.

We changed so for was the employee count grows. All of that idea that that massive change can't come from a singular place inside your business. It's got to be shared by really the whole organization. Yeah, now, that makes sense. Most has been great, Brian. If people want to learn more about ballet or more about yourself, where can they find you online? Here there's two places they can go. First, as blaze SOLUTIONSCOM, they can learn all about our services and what we do and how we serve our clients. And then the ones. I just recently wrote a book called Virtual Culture and the website for that is virtual culture bookcom and it's basically how our organization, we grew to size without ever having an actual office, and how we built our company culture around that. It's fantastic, excellent. I know a lot of folks are going to be interested in that and potentially interested in those services. That's great, Brian, thank you for being on the show. We appreciate it. Thank you for the opportunity, REX has been great. Becoming a thought leader doesn't just happen. If you want to build a strong personal brand and extend your reach online and offline, you need a plan. Want help developing yours. CHECK OUT IMPACT Summit. This one day event is bringing together best selling authors, professional athletes, influential CEOS and emerging entrepreneurs, all for one purpose, to equip you to lead, influence and inspire. Whether you're looking to build a lasting legacy with your business or extend the reach of your brand. Impact Summit speakers will share inspiring stories and practical lessons to help you on your way. Did we mention a session on launching and growing a podcast? You guessed it. You'll hear from sweet fish media's own James carberry during that session. You won't want to miss all of these influencers and leaders coming together in Salt Lake City on October thirteen. Ready to learn more? Check out influencer ink dot CEO IMPACT SUMMIT BE TOB growth. Listeners can get fifteen percent off the price of their tickets for this event by using the Promo Code Sweet Fish. Sweet Fish, so use that code, get...

...your tickets today and get ready to grow your brand and your influence at Impact Summit two thousand and Eighteen.

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