787: What Makes a High-Performing Marketing Team (According to Top CMO's) w/ Ray Coppinger

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Ray Coppinger, Head of Marketing at Teamwork.com.

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There's a ton of noise out there. So how do you get decision makers to pay attention to your brand? Start a podcast and invite your ideal clients to be guests on your show. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to be tob growth, a daily podcast for B to be leaders. We've interviewed names you've probably heard before, like Gary vanner truck and Simon Senek, but you've probably never heard from the majority of our guests. That's because the bulk of our interviews aren't with professional speakers and authors. Most of our guests are in the trenches leading sales and marketing teams. They're implementing strategy, they're experimenting with tactics. They're building the fastest growing be tob companies in the world. My name is James Carberry. I'm the founder of sweet fish media, a podcast agency for BB brands, and I'm also one of the CO hosts of this show. When we're not interviewing sales and marketing leaders, you'll hear stories from behind the scenes of our own business. Will share the ups and downs of our journey as we attempt to take over the world. Just getting well, maybe let's get into the show. Welcome back to the B tob growth show. We're here today with Ray Coppinger. He is the director of marketing at team work. Ray, how's it going today? Doing really well, Logan. Thanks so much. Hey. Well, thank you for being on the show. Ray, really excited to be able to do this interview with you. We had some scheduling conflux before, so really glad that you and I are getting a chance to to record this because I'm really excited for you to share the inscience that you guys gather through someone of the unique survey of modern marketing leaders. Before we do that rare I would love for you to share with our audience a little bit of background on yourself and maybe what you and the team at team worker up to these days. Absolutely, Logan, and just sit to say thanks so much for having us on. been a big fan of the the podcast for quite a while, so really excited to be here. My own background slogan is I've been a BB marketing for the last fifteen years and in my last role before team work I worked in Marquetto, so I'm very much coming from that Martech bubble and living within that kind of MARTECH space. So it's been really, really exciting to move into and non, I suppose you know, traditional Martech company but which still has application within the marketing community. In my role a team work today I'm heading up the marketing team and it's really exciting because the companies are really high growth kind of trajectory at the moment. I suppose just to give a little bit of background. At teamworkcom we builds as products for teams of all types and look our vision as a company's to make teams all around the world more efficient, organized and and effective. We have been in business for the last eleven years. We've grown to twenty fourzero paying customers globally and we have customers all the way up to the likes of Busney and then we kind of scale down to smaller businesses as well using some of our products. Just finally, to kind of round off Logan, currently we have three products in our sweet...

...team or projects is a tool which is a work management, project management collaboration platform which is used by thousands of marketing teams across the world and I think that's probably his most residents or relevance to the audience that we have today. We have trade today and then in q one hundred and twenty nineteen, we're lunching two more products into our suite and we hope to grow that speed up to ten products within the next three years. So lots of growth, lots of think be hiding things and excited to share a little bit of research today. Yeah, well, it definitely sounds like there's exciting things going on with you and your team race. So really excited to hear your insights here and the the topic we're going to be talking about today in the components that make up a really successful marketing team are things that were actually sourced through this survey that you guys collaborated with Jay Bear on. went to a lot of modern CMOS and marketing leaders and ask them some questions on this topic. So tell us a little bit about how this project got started and where you guys went with it before we get into some of the findings, would love to hear some of the background and how this came to be. Yeah, absolutely, Ogan. So the I think the survey came out of collaboration you mentioned. As you mentioned, with with J bear. I think we were wanted to explore you know, obviously we're coming from Teamworkcom we've a really convested interest in, you know, really understanding and being thought leaders in the whole concept of teamwork and, as I said, lots of our customers are marketing teams or creative teams. So what we wanted to kind of understand is, let's go to the thought leaders within marketed with a marketing space and let's hear what they believe are the characteristics, are traits of the best marketing teams I've they've either run or been a part of. So what we wanted to do with Jay was kind of reach out to some of the, I suppose, foremost CMOS who are currently working today, and we were really lucky. We have we had nine kind of CMOS and marketing leads kind of help us out with this, with this survey and research, and I think we've got a compelling set of secrets or kind of traits which they've come back and which have clearly kind of come out in what the surveys that Jay help us put together. And each one of them, you know, was basically responding with things that they found effective for building a team and also components of great teams that they've been a part of so really excited to dive in. The first one that kind of came out, bubbled up to the surface was hiring for culture or fit. So tell us a little bit about what the findings were around this point. Right. So with this one, I think what was really interesting and what I'll do maybe, Logano, I just kind of talk through some of the responses from some of those marketing leaders as well. But maybe before I get to that, one of the things, and we in Jay talked about this, was, you know, here a Teamworkcom, what we do, we have a set of core values in organization. We have six core values and what we do in terms of our hiring process, and there are performance reviews afterwards, is really higher and majure performance around those core values. So...

...when we're doing it, these were people, you know, we're assessing them against the six core values and if that individual and the success within getting the role within team Workcom, you know, our quarterly and annual performance series are all based around those core values and I think just for us, you know, in kind of the bubble here a Teamworkcom, that's a really effective way of hiring for cultural fit. But just that just to kind of connete gives some of the the other leaders a point of view on this. It was really interesting. It really strongly came across that, you know, culture of fit was one of the most important things. Peter Bell, who heads up the the marketing team for Marquetto in the India region, his take was that, you know, he believes that the most important thing is culture of it because basically he feels he can train for the skills that marketers need nowadays. But getting the person who fits in the organization and can work as part of the team was absolutely critical. So I think that was kind of an interesting one. You know, Jeff Rowers, who is the CMO or at yexed, he was talking about. You know, he wanted people who were kind of fearless in, you know, the face of change, can work on multiple projects whout getting overwhelm. So again, that's that kind of idea of bringing the people who can adapt to the culture with an organization and not get faced by kind of the obviously the very busy environments that they're working in. Yeah, and the changes, those are going to be a little bit different, but knowing the culture that you're hiring into. His kind of the starting point. They're right. You know, you've got to know what you're trying to match to. I think that's great, right. Yeah, no, absolutely. And then just a final one, Logan fear on this David Kine, who's the the CMO at plan grid. I think, you know, he's again, you know, tying back to this concept of, you know, teamwork and you know he kind of just, you know, his statements, he just seems a big believer in the power of the team. He kind of tries to avoid people who are very much about promoting themselves and he wants people who basically, you know, they go on to con advance themselves at in kind of you know, with the at the cost of the bigger pictures. So it's really about getting people who will plug into a team that he's creating and then deliver value through the others he's working with or around. I love that. You know, we've talked about that a lot on our team in hiring for cultural fit that you know you can you can kind of tweak the the positions and shuffle people around in the seats on the bus, as long as you know there's an overall fit and you can you can change those around if you're starting on the right foot and there is, you know, that cultural fit to fall back on. This next one you wanted to share, Ray, I think is a good segue from that in making success metrics transparent so you bring people in there are good fit for your culture. Now how do you how do you make, you know, success metrics transparent so that you know there's an ongoing good vibe of the culture and people feel rewarded, engaged and have an opportunity to succeed? So tell us a little bit more about what were the findings from some of these CMOS and marketing leaders...

...on this point? Yep, so this one of the thing is is is very near and dear to my heart as well. Logan, just in terms of, you know, marketing metrics. I know it's something which is a lot written about. It's a very popular topic within the marketing world in terms of people creating content around this. I think you know the general idea here is that, you know, marketing teams have, you know, we have in our own team here we have kind of multiple sub teams. You have the demand and team, we have a product marketing team, the corporate team, the marketing operations team, and I think the eye, just a general kind of sense from from the marketing leaders is that, you know, each kind of be to be marketing team member has to understand, you know, not just what they're measuring, not whether it's pipeline or opportunities or squls or quills, but they do understand how they're doing and ultimately why they're doing it as well, and I think that kind of really is was critical. Karen Steel, who's the cmot lean data, you know, she kind of said that basically all the team members had to be clear what the score board is and then have kind of real time access to seeing that scoreboard to see how they're tracking week to week, months and month quarter to quarter, to kind of really assessed as a marketing team. Are they driving the results that they're ultimately measured on? And you know, from a person perspective, I've worked in marketing teams where success metrics word transparent and it I think it is a huge blocker to people doing the best work and people, you know, really being able to kind of prioritize their work towards of things which have the most impact. Today's gross story is all about search engine marketing. The company were highlighting is sentinel one. This challenger Cyber Security Brand was set out to disrupt the endpoint protection space. Their brand was top notch, their product was innovative, but they were struggling to gain traction online in an already developed industry. Then they found directive consulting, a B toob search marketing agency. Within the first quarter of working with directive, Sentinel one was able to increase their organic traffic by a hundred and twenty eight percent and overall lead volume by an outstanding two hundred and fifty one percent. I have a hunch that directive can get these kind of results for you too, so head over to directive consultingcom and request a totally free custom proposal. That's directive consultingcom. All right, let's get back to this interview, this next one, just coming off of the flip my funnel conference, where there were a ton of marketing and sales people, a lot of great names on both sides of the House. There was even, you know, a family feud interaction between a marketing team and the sales side. You know, this topic of aligning with sales seems like we can't talk about it enough, and interested to see that it yet made yet another list here of what the top CMOS are talking about that make for successful marketing team. So what did they have to say about marketing and sales alignment?...

Right, yeah, I kind of when I saw this come through in the survey Logan and and you'll know this having worked in kind of in the bad marketing space for a good while now. It's it kind of makes every list, doesn't it? It's one of those kind of it's the no brainer one. But I think, you know, it's really worth highlighting this because, you know, again, based on personal experience and seeing, you know, marketing teams in action, it's something just which needs constant love and carried attention to make sure that that that relationship is strong. I think just in terms of some of the things that were coming out, you know Tim cop his take was that, you know, marketing a lot of times get sucked into the activity bubble or the activity trap, which is, you know, looking at channels and just being doing busy work but really kind of forgetting about you know, how does this align with what sales are trying to do? You know, I think the thing which came out clear for pretty much from everybody was sales are int the B Tob World Anyway, sales are marketing is kind of primary customer and I think that's a mindset markets absolutely need to have. So I think some of the things that came out in terms of practical things which I think are really interesting. You know, Jeff Roars, he said that marketing have to be listening into sales calls. They need to get a deeper level of understanding of what's going on in a sales opportunity so that they can add value along the way to those opportunities being created. But I think, you know, the main takeaway I think I came out with from this section, I think Logan was, you know, just in terms of marketing, getting into the detail of what sales do day to day. Again, just some practically examples here. Team work. You know, we rotate people over to the sales team to sit alongside them, to do a day in sales shadowing people, understanding what the life of a salesperson does. You know, we're doing some customer visits next month and I'm going to be flying out with our head of customer engage we to sit and listen to what customers are doing with the sales team. You just really kind of understanding. We can bring that back and bring that into everything we're doing in marketing. Yeah, I think that is unbelievably impactful with, you know, not only having your team sit alongside sales, listen to sales calls, do a day in the life of sales, as you put it. I love that. I was recently on a previous episode of the show talking with Mark Smith, the VP of sales at wantly, and he was talking about the portance of sales people sitting down and being able to empathize with their prospective clients and people that fit their buyer persona and, as you mentioned, sales being the primary internal customer of marketing. There goes a long way when there's that understanding and empathy. Right. Yep, absolutely awesome. The next thing, Ray, we were talking about before we hit record on this was, you know, prioritizing projects and tying them to business goals. So I have to think some of this has to come back with you know, sales and marketing lineman a little bit because, you know, prioritizing projects, like you said, making sure...

...that they're not busy work, that they're actually tied to to revenue. But curious to hear what some of the top CMOS are talking about on this point. Yeah, this was really interesting. I think Tim Cop who was previously the CMO, it's at exact target and he's run some really big, I guess, marketing teams and functions. But what Tim said it was really interesting. He said that like within eighteen months, what kind of gets and kills a lot of CMOS is effectively knowing how to prioritize their work, and which I think is really interesting. I think the average lifetime to see Moo is about twenty four to thirty six months. So I think it's interesting that Tim is identifying kind of that ability to prioritize work. I think is something which was a really challenging part of being a CMO nowadays and you know, I think we see that day to day. You know again see in kind of and working with other marketing leaders, it is really difficult to to know what work is the most can of impactful, what is the most the highest priority. I think you know, this one ties, like you be said, to pretty much some of the other points we talked about. The aligned with sales, the ability to kind of have success metrics clearly defined and and available and I think, I think what Tim says is that you kind of need to figure out sequentially, you know, how going to do, you know, pick out the biggest piece of work, keep them, prioritize and then knocking down. That's and he's take is that it's part our part signs, and I think I am I kind of agree with that. And again, not to kind of reader at things, but you know, he gets he talks about, you know, this idea of getting blind by blinded by tactics not getting something into that busy work kind of syndrome as well. You I think the other part of this, I guess, in terms of prioritization, is, you know, if you have the right metries in place, you know if you have the right technology stack in terms of, you know, managing your work, managing, you know, the priorities here a team work. We have this quarterly, you know, I suppose it's gold setting, or we call them rocks, to every every quarter we set, you know, five or six rocks as a company and then within each each team, they have their rocks for the quarter and that's that's a good way, I think, of making sure that you are working towards things which don't shift. You know, once you have set her up for the quarter, you continue to work in that until it's done. But yeah, this is a really big one and technology can help, but, as tim says, it is part art as well. There is a kind of an art to this, to this being good at this. Yeah, well, the next thing kind of flows from that. That made this list Ray, you know, providing real time feedback as you're setting up your teams. This is the goal, this is what we're rowing towards. You know, this is the goal. That's not going to change. What do you do in the meantime to make sure that you're helping people stay on course and you're you know, it's still promoting a good culture internally, keeping people motivated and feeling good about their work. So tell us a little bit about what marketing leaders had to say about providing real time feedback to their team throughout, you know, their their marketing team themselves. Yeah, I think what you just said there, because it...

...was interesting Logan in terms of you know, I think it is about leading here and, you know, providing real time feedback is I think it's a scale of a great leader is to be able to identify that and some of the leaders are that we talked to call is sell this idea that, you know, doing a quarterly or annual review to give feedback, you know, in today's world is and it's obviously that, you know, fairly ineffective in some ways. Obviously it's useful mechanism, but I guess it's come through strongly from a lot of the leaders that in the moment, feedback, Robin I tuli calls it a gift. I think I'd strongly agree with that. You know, Peter Bell said, you know, he just getting calls out the same thing, which is bottling feedback up so you can, you know, provide it at a quarterly or semi and you or biannual kind of cadence is just not really effective nowadays, and I think that is really true and I think it is about helping people develop, you know, being able to write feedback in a candid way, but also in a way which allows them to kind of react in real time and adjust and actually improve or or make corrections to what people are doing. I think is is really, really important and I think it's a it's another one and just maybe to call this out Logan. You know, do you look back through, you know, the five kind of traits or characteristics are great teams. You know, we're not talking about technology, about ability to use technology or skills. A lot of this is softer stuff. It's about, you know, being able to work as part of our team. It's about to give and receive feedback. You know, it's about being able to align and partner with with other teams. So I think that's a really interesting thing here. It's none of the technical skills which we talk a lot about. It's not about the data skills. Yeah, it's about the the human skills which are really coming out here. HMM. Yeah, I definitely see that, you know, as a common theme. And in this last one you were just talking about, right in providing real time feedback. You know, there's the human moment. You know, not only do we expect, you know, real time instant ratification with feedback because of the pace at which everything else moves around us. Right, like we can look at our bank account. We know exactly how much money is. We don't wait for a month and statement anymore. Why should we wait for a month, then four feedback from our manager, right, and then it's also not as applicable when it's not coming in the moment, it's a little bit tougher to apply it. And so a lot of these things, as you touched on a little bit in one of the respondence talking about that, there's a lot of art to each one of these, but I think that they're all ones that you know, marketing leaders of teams large and small, could walk away and and figure out how do I break these down in, you know, my specific context for my team? I think you've provided, you know, five really great points that that do make for successful marketing teams, in the fact that you know, these are leading CMOS in the marketing space talking about these things. I really appreciate you sharing some of these findings. I think it's interesting the way that you guys tackled this this study. Ray, if anybody listening to this would like to follow up with you,...

...read more of the information in this study that you guys compiled or just stay connected with you, what's the best way for them to go about doing that? Yeah, absolutely, and I tank you so much. No good for walking through those with me. In terms of connecting with me, I'm on Linkedin. You can catch me on twitter at ray copies my handled and you know it's you want to check out team work. Just teamworkcom. You can get access to to e book which kind of goes through the points we just touched on and up be happy to kind of continue the conversation on any of those channels. Awesome, well read. This has been such a pleasure. Thank you for sharing your expertise with our audience. Really glad we got a chance to do this. Man thanks. I've been reappreciate it. Becoming a thought leader doesn't just happen. If you want to build a strong personal brand and extend your reach online and offline, you need a plan. Want help developing yours. CHECK OUT IMPACT Summit. This one day event is bringing together best selling authors, professional athletes, influential CEOS and emerging entrepreneurs, all for one purpose, to equip you to lead, influence and inspire. Whether you're looking to build a lasting legacy with your business or extend the reach of your brand. Impact Summit speakers will share inspiring stories and practical lessons to help you on your way. Did we mention a session on launching and growing a podcast? You guessed it. You'll hear from sweet fish media's own James Carberry. During that session. You won't want to miss all of these influencers and leaders coming together in Salt Lake City on October thirteen. Ready to learn more? Check out influencer INC DOT Co. IMPACT SUMMIT BE TOB growth. Listeners can get fifteen percent off the price of their tickets for this event by using the Promo Code Sweet Fish. Sweet Fish, so use that code, get your tickets today and get ready to grow your brand and your influence at impact summit. Two Thousand and Eighteen.

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