782: Rebuilding a 20-Year-Old Brand From the Ground Up w/ Jaime Punishill

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Jaime Punishill, CMO of Lionbridge.

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There's a ton of noise out there. So how do you get decision makers to pay attention to your brand? Start a podcast and invite your ideal clients to be guests on your show. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to be tob growth, a daily podcast for B TOB leaders. We've interviewed names you've probably heard before, like Gary Vander truck and Simon Senek, but you've probably never heard from the majority of our guests. That's because the bulk of our interviews aren't with professional speakers and authors. Most of our guests are in the trenches leading sales and marketing teams. They're implementing strategy, they're experimenting with tactics, they're building the fastest growing BB companies in the world. My name is James Carberry. I'm the founder of sweet fish media, a podcast agency for BB brands, and I'm also one of the CO hosts of this show. When we're not interviewing sales and marketing leaders, you'll hear stories from behind the scenes of our own business. Will share the ups and downs of our journey as we attempt to take over the world. Just getting well, maybe let's get into the show. Welcome back to the B tob grows show. We're here today with Jamie punish all. He is the chief marketing officer at Lion Bridge. Jamie, how's it going today? Man, awesome. Thanks so much, Logan to having a great day. Awesome. Well, good to hear and really glad that we're able to connect, especially knowing that you're going through a bit of a brand reboot with your company. So making for long days and I appreciate you making some some time to share your expertise on going through that process with our audience here. I think you've got some really practical takeaways to share with some other marketers who are maybe sitting in the same seat or will be at some point soon, and having to face, you know, a large brand reboots. So excited to dive into that topic. But before we do, Jamie, I would love for you to give our audience a little bit of context about who you are and you know what the team at Lion Bridge is up to these days. Sure, I'm fairly new to lion bridge and fairly new to this industry. I joined last November. Lion Bridge is one of the world leaders in language services in linguistic expertise really and global go to market support. So as a companies take their their brands and their products to different cultures, different languages, different markets. That's where we have a long time, twenty plus year leadership in the industry and the ball industry is going through a transition and we've we've got a, you know, a new CEO and a whole new executive team. So it's a pretty exciting time over here. Awesome. Jamie, you mentioned this is not your first time going through a major, you know, brand reboot of an older established company. So tell us a little bit about you know,...

...what is like going through this the second go round, before we get to some of the talking points that you mentioned that we'd like to share about. You know what it's like to go through that? Yeah, well, I mean, look, it's great to have had the experience of the first time, that's for sure, because it's it's not an easy mountain to the climb. I most recently, before Lion Bridge, was at Tiaa, which is a large institutional money manager and and financial advice. Really Finetza Services Company, who is your may or may not know, did its first national advertising campaign and rebranding program a couple of years back and I the fortune of helping a think through that. So a lot, frankly, a lot of the lessons of tanking and organization like that which had, you know, really not had sort of a single unified brand, really rethinking it's, you know, go to market, digital engagement strategy hats. That are have been key lessons and learnings that have guided us as we've set up the program for thinking through how we take Lion Bridge, which is, you know, real history of acquisitions and and and building up a company. And, you know, we're in forty seven countries. Are we have offices and forty seven countries, you know, we support, you know, customers and all in about every conceivable market. We help folks with three hundred and fifty plus languages and sort of stitching together last twenty years of global growth and telling one cohesive story across every industry and every dimension is it's a fun challenge, but a lot of work. Nice awesome. Well, definitely some hard earned lessons that you've experienced in going through this and and now going through it a second time helping, you know, a brand with a major reboot. I think you've got some valuable things to share with our audience. The first thing that you mentioned as we were talking about this offline, Jamie, was, you know, rethinking everything to a foundational or anatomic level, backing up maybe further than you think you need to in this process. Tell us a little bit about that in the context of this brand rebuilding topic. Yeah, so I think it's it's a something you watch a lot. I watch a lot, a lot of mistakes when people the other of a they find a new technology or they've got a new thing to do and they try to just apply it against the old world as it is, and and what you get then is sort of a new version of the old right. I like to you know, if you automate a bad process, you just have a faster way of doing things badly. Yeah, right is a sort of a good way to think about it. And and I think when you're going through an exercise like this, if you are hoping that the to say this, my old boss, God bless her, you know, would repeat to US almost at nauseum. You know, branding...

...starts at home and so much of an new brand, rebirth or a rebrand of an organization is really about galvanizing the internal culture around this new belief, this this this new message, this sort of new rally and Chris, such as it were. And if you're going to do that you've really got to unpack all the way back underneath to understand how people got to where they were. And so I'll give you a really sort of simple example. That sounds like mom and Apple Pie, but I'm all often struck by how people don't do it. And you see. You take something like Seo Right, seo in and of itself is not a terribly difficult thing, but you see a lot of companies struggle at it and then when you unpack why this struggling, you realize that they haven't gone all the way back to the beginning and said how do I even think about creating a piece of content and pushing it out into the market? And and so at Tia is a good example. We had to go back and actually rewrite the entire marketing brief to make sure that Feo content and search terms were inside of the beginning of the brief process and then reach train every market who was thinking about how would you go thinking about a piece of content, so that SEO was up front so that, as it pushed all the way through, the content was designed with that execution in mind, whereas you see in most, in many organizations, I should stations a most, in many cases you see folks do the exact same thing they've always done and then say super now let's add let's do some search optimization to it, and of course it's never that effective. And I think that applies against any of these new activities. Right, you think about you know, one of the things that we do a lot of is help folks go into new markets. Well, if you know you're going into a new market and you're just going to take a campaign or a product or an approach that you've already developed in one market and just bolted into a new market, that's not nearly going to be as effective as you go all the way back and you say I got a design, a product that works in multiple markets. And so, you know, we went as we're looking at that here. We literally are thinking about every process, every piece of content, the website, all of our social channels, our whole approach to content strategy. Literally think about everything as if you were starting fresh, and it's an opportunity to do that too. You get to question every assumption. So don't, don't, don't miss that window. But if you don't, it's like, you know, tearing down a two story house and trying to put a hundred and ten story skyscraper on it. It was built to support a two story how but foundation with not built for a hundred and ten, you know, story skyscraper. And so if you don't go all the way down and you really limit what you can build on top of it. Yeah, I think that's a fantastic analogy. You've got to back up a little bit further, maybe, maybe a step or two further than you're actually thinking. And while that can...

...be daunting, you know what I caught that you just said there is that, you know, it's also an opportunity. It's an opportunity to question a lot of assumptions. It's a lot of opportunity for a fresh start. So, while it can be daunting, there's also a great opportunity in this process if you're willing to back up far enough. The next thing, Jamie, you mentioned that you've found very, very helpful to keep in mind in a sort of rebranding or a brand reboot process like this is to design with change in mind, and I think you had a good analogy of, you know, your plan and strategy alongside a gps in picking the spot where you're going when you set your your gps directions on your smartphone. Tell us a little bit more about that. Yeah, look, I think there's not a businessperson, much less a marketer, who can with a straight face look at you and say here's exactly where the organization's going to be in twelve months or twenty four months or thirty six months. And yet so much of our planning process is designed with these very, very long cycles and and and long programs in mind. With, again, if you haven't done the first steff where you're rethrink your structure, you're just planning on a different cadence than the world is operating now. You know, I can't tell you if augmented reality or conversational search agents will be really important net in September, but they're probably going to be relatively important sometime soon for many businesses. How do I structure a really long marketing plan or really long program or campaign that doesn't have flexibility built into it? And so what I encourage my teams to do and when we're doing. We're thinking about our planning, even our budgeting is is to your point. I think about it very much like a GPS exercise, like hopping in my car. I know my point of departure and I know my point of arrival and, with few exceptions, those are fairly well understood and those are are fairly certain. What I can't tell you is at any given moment exactly the path that we're going to take. Right. So you know every week just about I'm driving up to Boston from Connecticut where I live. You know it's a roughly threehour drive plus or and I go into ways and it knows my office. But I will tell you almost every week as a slightly different path because price don't know how traffic is going to build up ahead or the accident with the cops and Saturn. I think that's no difference in business and and so smart marketers, I think these days are literally building some machility and flexibility into their process to give them some optionality, because the world is just pivoting so fast with so many new mediums and so many different trends that if you haven't built that in, you've literally designed failure into your system because you're too rigid. Today's gross story is all about search engine marketing. The company...

...were highlighting is sentinel one. This challenger Cybersecurity brand was set out to disrupt the endpoint protection space. Their brand was top notch, their product was innovative, but they were struggling to gain traction online in an already developed industry. Then they found directive consulting, a Bob Search Marketing Agency. Within the first quarter of working with directive, Sentinel one was able to increase their organic traffic by a hundred and twenty eight percent and overall lead volume by an outstanding two hundred and fifty one percent. I have a hunch that directive can get these kind of results for you to so head over to directive consultingcom and request a totally free custom proposal. That's directive consultingcom. All right, let's get back to this interview. Awesome. The next thing, Jamie, you wanted to talk about was, I think, goes off of that really well. You mentioned, you know, the speed at which things are moving, and so, as we think about our buyers, one of the things that you mentioned is really critical in this sort of process is assuming the global nature of your buyers set a little light on that for us. Yeah, I think the you know, in a in a world where we are digitally led in lots of our interactions. And there are a few exceptions. So that clearly and there are certain businesses, you know, if you're in a regulated market where you can only work in one you know, locale, this is probably a little less relevant. But for the rest of us, you know, the minute you put up the website, the minute you put up the the social account or the blog or whatever, you lit instantaneously have an audience in the billions and you can't control, by and large, where that audience is coming from. And you know, I I think I shared, you know, when I was part of the team, I led the team that develop social media for City Bank, you know, ten years ago, and it was literally my face on the first twitter account that went live and it was really for citybank North America, but I couldn't stop the guys in Brazil, people in Singapore from discovering that account and asking us questions and we just we weren't structured for that right by a stretch of the imagination. And that was, you know, ten years ago and you know, a few hundred million mobile of you know, smartphones ago, right, and so if you're not assuming that your audience is going to come from lots of different places, than you're already all prepared, whether that's, you know, the language that you choose to do business in, the you know just the traffic, the shipping, the payments, you know, you can go right through the list of things that you might need small business or a large enterprize. But you know, the global markets exist now and that globality, I think it's there's again just a new thing. You know, just and you know, forget the the political environment and the noise that's going on in the world. They just one...

...hundred percent clear that more and more corporations and more and more buyers are operating as if it's a global marketplace, which is also a super exciting opportunity, but quite a different thing. Yeah. So the next thing that I know you mentioned is foundational in in this sort of approach, for you at least, almost is a little bit counter to that point of thinking about, you know, the differences and the different challenges that you're going to have to overcome in also not losing sight of the commonality. So you know, I think you put it well. As we were chatting offline, Jamie, is assuming more commonality in your audience, then you might first expect tell us a little bit about how you've approached that, what you've learned doing, you know, a rebranding project, and how this comes into play there. Yeah, and I think, look, this is, I think part of any marketing exercise, much less something like a rebranding project, where you know, if you're really taking a step back and looking at the world from your buyers view in and trying to understand the differences in your buyers and the different messages are the ways in which you can you can engage with with that, with that customer set. We hear lots of terms now, hyper personalization, hyper targeting, you know, and selling and so forth, and and your head will explode if you try to come up with the thirty seven hundred per mutations. And I'm sure right now there's a couple of guys getting ready to email me about how they're going to have ai solutions that will help me hyper target. But I think it misses it misses the most important point about people, and I think you see this inherent and say apples marketing, which looks for these the essence of humanity that really will stretch across the globe, that focuses on they don't try to be different in every market, that actually try to figure out what is the chor essence of humanity and every market. And we're not all apple but if you focus that way, you know, I think you know I use a metaphor or, you know, sort of an analogy. Ninetynine percent of the DNA of a rat and human are the same and that's really important for things like testing drugs or beauty products or the things like that that we don't want to test on humans. That's similarity really matters. Now the one percent matters too, because most of us don't like to think of ourselves is all that close to you sort of a gray road and with a bad rat for the plague. So difference is matter and they can matter a lot. But we we spend all of our time focusing on one percent, which can lead you down really a complex path of unnecessary differentiation when in reality bust of your buyers have similar problems. They've slightly different needs of slightly different moments and they'll resonate with slightly different things. But we're really, as humans, more alike than we are different. It's a much simpler approach to your marketing...

...if you start with the assumption how do I find as much commonality as I can and focus only on essential difference. Yeah, I love it, Jamie. The last thing I know you want to touch on was, you know, thinking about your team. So if we think about you, know you're you're taking a brand in a new direction and in rebranding is a huge undertaking and obviously there are a lot of people that that contribute to this sort of effort. So thinking about your team very critically and how you can equip them to make this transition and and what is the right that? So tell us quickly, you know what what you've learned in that area in what people should be thinking about on this point with a project like this. Yeah, this is a completely unscientific statement, but anytime I've gone in any sort of change management, big transition like exercise, I kind of assumed that forty percent of the folks eat just aren't going to make they're just not going to make the transition. They whether it's they are unwilling, they are too tethered, they are unable however you choose to view that crew. There are lots of folks that just aren't going to make the transition and I think more often than not I watch folks go in and try to drive a change or a transformation and they pretty much assume that they can just bring nearly a hundred percent of people along for the ride, and I think that's a dangerous assumption going in and I think is a leader. That really leaves you with two things when you've got to really understand you're asking. If you if you take the first three or four things that we talked about, if you're rethinking things at the atomic level, you might have folks have been doing essentially the same thing the same way for the last twenty or twenty five years. That is an awful big ask to ask them to rethink thing, to question every sacred cow and think about things that the atomic level. And so one you've got to be watching to see, you know who can really make that transition and know that some folks just aren't going to and you're not doing anybody any favors, not them and not the rest of your team, by keep trying to force people who can't. They just can't pivot to pivot. But the flip side of it is there's also a tremendous responsibility to embrace learning and education and really equip the team to start to look for ways to think differently and and and celebrate the the the new approaches and and frankly, create the the learning environment for for all of the employees set to become a new fashion of themselves. Otherwise you're just doomed to you just you could do the same thing the same way to slightly differently and you won't them with any any kind of at a change outcome that you're really looking for. Yeah, yeah, definitely want to avoid that and be able to head where you want to head, especially with, you know, a large undertaking such as this. But, Jamie, I really...

...appreciate you sharing some of these nuggets from your experience doing not one but multiple brand reboots in your time at various marketing roles. So if anybody listening to this, Jamie, would like to ask you some follow up questions or reach out and stay connected, what's the best way for them to go about doing that? Yeah, that you can certainly find me on Linkedin. There's only four punishals in the universe, which is a story onto itself which I'm happy to share with anybody. So if you you can find me on on Linkedin, or they could just email me directly. The hard part is spelling my name right, but if you go to Jamie dot punish all at Lion birdgecom and my first night name is Jaya, I am e'm more than happy to help in any way I can. Awesome. This has been great. Jamie, thanks for coming on the show. Real pleasure. Logan, thanks too much for having me. Becoming a thought leader doesn't just happen. If you want to build a strong personal brand and extend your reach online and offline, you need a plan. Want help developing yours. CHECK OUT IMPACT Summit. This one day event is bringing together best selling authors, professional athletes, influential CEOS and emerging entrepreneurs, all for one purpose, to equip you to lead, influence and inspire. Whether you're looking to build a lasting legacy with your business or extend the reach of your brand. Impact Summit speakers will share inspiring stories and practical lessons to help you on your way. Did we mention a session on launching and growing a podcast? You guessed it. You'll hear from sweet fish media's own James carberry during that session. You won't want to miss all of these influencers and leaders coming together in Salt Lake City on October thirteen. Ready to learn more? CHECK OUT INFLUENCER INK DOT Co. IMPACT SUMMIT BE TOB growth. Listeners can get fifteen percent off the price of their tickets for this event by using the Promo Code Sweet Fish. Sweet Fish, so use that code, get your tickets today and get ready to grow your brand and your influence at impact summit. Two Thousand and Eighteen.

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