766: The Importance of Understanding the Psychology of Your Buyer w/ Colin Receveur

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Colin Receveur, CEO at SmartBox.

Click here to connect with this guest on LinkedIn.

Looking for a guaranteed way to create content that resonates with your audience? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients and let them choose the topic of the interview, because if your ideal clients care about the topic, there's a good chance the rest of your audience will care about it too. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to be tob growth, a daily podcast for B to be leaders. We've interviewed names you've probably heard before, like Gary Vander truck and Simon Senek, but you've probably never heard from the majority of our guests. That's because the bulk of our interviews aren't with professional speakers and authors. Most of our guests are in the trenches leading sales and marketing teams. They're implementing strategy, they're experimenting with Pactics, they're building the fastest growing betb companies in the world. My name is James Carberry. I'm the founder of sweetish media, a PODCAST agency for B Tob Brands, and I'm also one of the CO hosts of this show. When we're not interviewing sales and marketing leaders, you'll hear stories from behind the scenes of our own business. Will share the ups and downs of our journey as we attempt to take over the world. Just getting well? Maybe let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BE TOB growth show. This episode is brought to you by directive consulting, the BE TOB search marketing agency. Today we are joined by call and Receiver Collin, is not only the CEO at smart box, but he is also a prolific podcast or himself. Collin, welcome to the show. Hey, thanks, thanks, glad to be on here today. That's a pleasure to have you on the show. I mean I was we were just talking before before we started recording. Colin is they're coming up on their one, twelve hundred episode of their podcast, which is just absolutely thrilling. I love that. I did not realize that. I mean, this is a real treat for me, even more so than I realized. But today Paulin is going to be sharing some thoughts with us around this idea of understanding...

...the psychology of your buyers and I think it's very cool. It's a very unique topic that we're going to dive into. But calm, before we do die I dive in today's topic. Maybe you can tell us a little about what you and the smart box team are up to these days. We work with Dennis all around the world helping them to attract more and better patients and in my dad, the dentist, that's how I got into the the world of dentistry and you know, we've been working with dennist exclusively for the past decade. So you know, when you're able to niche down and really understand your the persauna of your buyer and and what they really are buying, because I think ultimately a lot of us that started out, at least in my case, I started out as like the technician, the artist, I call it right. I mean I was when we were doing marketing. I was the guy that built the websites in the beginning. Like I was of hands on, and we often think that our buyers want to buy the things that we're really good at building and ultimately that that can't be more wrong. They don't want to buy websites. What they want to buy is freedom. They want to buy, you know, more patients and connecting what the implied promises to what they actually want is really the secret to, you know, massive growth in your business. It's the secret to retention of your clients. It's the secret to ultimately helping your clients better because you're able to give them what they want. I mean, if a client walked in the door and just flat out told you exactly what he wanted, that'd be super easy for everybody, right. And you know, understanding the psychology behind their request is critical. Yeah, yeah, absolutely well. I mean the the last several years of doing this show have been huge education, educational experience for me, like learning about, yeah, the fact that you know when you're when you're selling,...

...when you're marketing, it's it's you're trying to solve a problem. They don't care, they don't care about you. It's about almost about making your buyer the hero of the journey. I mean we've, I think we've dedicated episodes to that kind of concept. So I think this is, you know, this is taking it even to a different level and I know that call. One of the things that we were going to kind of kick off this conversation talking about is the is the idea that marketing is also about results. That is, at its heart, what marketing should be about. I won't say is, because often times there's there's that implied promise, right. There's that implied promise that if I build you a website and I do this marketing for you, that, Jonathan, you're going to get what you want out of that. But oftentimes those those things aren't connected. And what that leads to it it's misalignment. It leads to misdexpectations because, you know, there wasn't a conversation, there wasn't an understanding of of what really happened there. You know, when we're working with our dentist, for example, we look at the metrics that really matter to our dentist and that is buts in the chairs. So we have a for instance, one thing, I'll give you a prime example of how we're different than other marketing agencies. We have a team here at smart box that actually listens to every phone call that goes into a our dentist practices because we want to know a yeah, our marketings working, those clicks and hits and technical factors look great, be calls are being generated right, because ultimately that's the goal of marketing, but then also see that their front disk is actually a pointing the patients that are calling and getting them into the chairs right, because we could be sending them bad leads. We could be sending them great leads. Their front office could be awful, their front office could be great. We have no optics on the situation unless we actually monitor that step of the conversion process. So that was a really...

...big a HA moment for us a few years ago when we built that that division of smart box out, and it's been tremendous because it gives the doctors what they really want. But they didn't they didn't really understand that that's what they wanted. Right everybody hears the buzz words and they need a new website or that. Somebody tells them their social media is bad or whatever it is, and they take this tactical, whackamole kind of approach. And when you when you elevate above that and you start thinking, man, what I really want? I just want a full schedule. Okay, how do I get a full schedule? And you start this drill down process and it starts to make a lot more sense. Does that? Does that make sense, Jonathan? It does, it doesn't? Yeah, I'm they said. It does make a lot of sense to me. I mean it's interesting because you are you're thinking very critically about the results, but you are also, you know, you're trying to understand the why behind the what. I mean, it is kind of a combination of these two things. So calling you have any do you have any advice for our listeners and as it pertains specifically then to this idea of understanding the psychology of of your buyers and how it's critical? I don't know, how do you put yourself in in their shoes? How do you dissect that? How do you maybe even just kind of reframe the way that you're approaching this, that you are understanding the why behind the what? I think it helps, frankly, that I've got a dad that's a dinnist that I had to put up with for eighteen years, you know, living with him. I think that's a big boost. But I think ultimately, I think you have to lead with empathy and lead with an understanding of trying to put yourself in their shoes and figure out what they're going through. So a dinnist perspective, a dinnist daily routine consist of getting to the office, treating patients, probably being the marketing manager or the marketing coordinator, managing the staff, doing the clinical work right because they're the dinnist and the owner. In many cases they are the person that probably orders supplies and smaller offices...

...and some offices they even do hygiene. And you know, whereas me and you and our businesses, we have the ability to delegate a lot or to build hierarchies of people that can support us, for dentist it's very much an upside down funnel. They are the point person for so much. You know, legally, their business can't even run if they're not in the four walls of the building right. So, if you mind, your business couldn't run if weren't sitting here at our desk. You know that would start to think about how that would change how you go about your daily routine and what you do. So, you know, just trying to understand and trying to take hats off of their head. What can we do to make this faster, simpler, easier for the dentist, so it takes them less time, less energy, less decision making, less resources? And then how do we get them to the result that they really want? How can we spoon feed this to them and make this brainless right? Because we know we do great things and we know we deliver tremendous value. But ultimately, at the end of the day, if the dentist, the client doesn't agree with your value proposition and the value you deliver, you know their history, they're canceling. You have to make sure that those things are intimately aligned. Yeah, absolutely, and and certainly as you as you mentioned this idea of empathy and you know, just, you know, keeping keeping their frame of reference in mind, trying to trying to think critically from from their perspective. So, while the important, so you know, we do have kind of this idea of the results being tied to marketing, understand starting to understand the psychology of your buyer, but there's also this this third component of the third thing we were going to be touching on to on today's episode is this idea of internal standards. And I know that the idea of internal standards has been has been important,...

...certainly to you and and can be important to to all teams out there. So kind of what is this idea of internal standards and why has it been so critical for a high performance team? Yeah, great question. So we've, I mean, a quick background on what my experience is. So this is this is the paradigm that I come from smart box. I started it in the early s and I was a solo preneur up until two thousand and twelve. I decided in two thousand and eleven, two thousand and twelve, shortly after I got married and we were thinking about having our first kid, I was like, you know, I need to do something with my life and I did some critical thinking and I decided, Hey, I'm going to I'm going to grow this puppy. So, you know, we put together, I put together this this grand plan and we set out. I had my two thousand and twenty goal that we set out in two thousand and eleven with and my wife probably thought I was crazy, probably still does. But you know, over the next few years we went through, you know, a period of growth that, you know, was one year over two hundred percent, over a hundred percent, several years in between. And you know, now we've landed with being this this you know, dental marketing brand with, you know, sixty employees and working with guys all around the world. So you know, I think the idea of the psychology of your buyer and internal standards and metrics are really a lot more closely related than maybe one seems on the surface. When you're going in to understand the persauna of your by are, you ask why a lot, and we have an expression here inside smart box, the five wise in generally, when you ask yourself why, five times you get to the real answer. So, Hey, a client's upset with us. Why? Well, they didn't get the phone calls they wanted. Well, why? Well, you know, the phone didn't ring. Well, why? Well, the marketing didn't work. Why? Well,...

...the client didn't engage with us to launch their marketing campaign in time to get the results they needed this month. Well, why didn't that happen? Well, it didn't happen because our client success rep, you know, for example, didn't express the importance of this initial phone call, this kickstart event, to the clients, so they didn't understand how critical it was. You know, when this this waterfall effect, CASS SCADD and now we've gotten to the we've gotten to the real problem. So now we can fix it right. We're not addressing symptoms, we're getting to the root cause. When we're dealing with metrics and standards for teams and building a high performance team, I think it's really the same process. Instead of asking why, you ask how. Right. So the five howls. So I want to build a twenty million dollar company. How are we going to do that? Well, that means I need to be at fifteen million and ten million and five million at these points in the next several years. How are we going to do that? Well, it means this month I need to be at this number of new sales and this amount of leads and this and this and this. Well, how are we going to do that? Well, now let's break that down into a weekly view. This week I need to do these things that are going to drive into this month, that are going to drive into this quarter, into this year and into this decade, into my big Harry audacious goal, to quote Jim Collins. And that's and that's how this works. So it's standards, metrics, psychology, empathy, you know, leading your team. It's I think it's all. You know, one of my favorite quotes is from Jack Welch. Jack Welch says, I'm probably going to screw the quoteup because I'm going from memory, but it here. Was the essence of it. Great leaders don't have great answers. Great leaders have great questions...

...and you have to be okay, looking like the dumbest person in the room when you ask them. I think I really you. It's funny, but I think it captures the essence. Like if you walk into a meeting and ask your team how are we going to get to x million by the end of this year, the end of this quarter or the end of whatever, you look pretty dumb as the leader of your company to ask that. But ultimately, if they can't answer the question, you can't drive the whole company. You know, they have to own their areas and they have to understand how it all rolls up. Yeah, I think that's really what Jack was saying in one of his pieces that I read that in once. Yeah, well, and you know it's it is tough. It is tough to put yourself out there, but I but it makes a lot of sense. You know, you have to you everyone is kind of, you know, driving towards it, towards the common purpose. You surround yourself with the right kind of talent and you get and you get answers that you know you may not have otherwise been able to come up with with yourself. I do. I don't remember if it was God, who was Einstein or someone that, you know, said something like, you know, I never learned a single thing while I was talking. You know, I mean sort of in the same vein that you can you know, you need to be able to ask the right questions and then you can open yourself up to some fantastic answers. So, you know, calling you've done a you've done a remarkable job of sort of tying all these thoughts together about marketing results and understand the psychology of your buyers and how even how that relates to creating the right kinds of internal standards for success. And to bring this back to the you know, you you had to sit down and have a conversation with yourself about you know, like I'm I want to make something of myself. I knew, you know, I want to do something. I'm at a crossroads and here's how I'm going to move forward. You know, and I think that actually segue is really brilliantly into this idea of legacy. We've gotten some tremendous this response on asking...

...these questions on the show. So, Colin, I'd love to hear from you kind of this idea of what kind of legacy are you hoping to leave behind? At the end of the day, whether that is personal, professional or a combination of the two. I know that you had had sort of talked about your family also is being an important part of that. You know, I grew up in my dad, in addition to being a Dentif, he grew up in construction and he raised me in that environment. You know, we've built houses and and remodeled and at the end of the day, if you've never put a roof on or demo to house with no mechanicals in the middle of summer, I don't think you've put in a real hard day of work before. And doing stuff like that it teaches one the value of a hard day's work. It teaches one in appreciation for building something bigger. Right, not not necessarily just being in the business of trading time for money. And, you know, legacy. I think there's so many facets to that. I mean, ultimately I want to help you know, Dennis, like my dad, who have, you know, struggled in marketing and growth? Who have, you know, not really seen the clear path to how do I how do I grow my practice and build my own legacy? And you know what, what do I want to be remembered for professionally as being, you know, the the company that's helped dentist change their own lives or or have freedom from their practice, because I see so many dentists that, you know, work six days a week and you know it's not a good it's not a good tradeoff because they don't understand or they haven't been shown yet. You know, they don't teach a lot of business and dental school. Then if you haven't been through dental school, you probably don't realize that, but don't teach business and marketing and it's it's you know, these guys are a lot like I was in the beginning. Their artist, their technicians and they love what they do, but they just have to figure out how to...

...get the rubber to meet the road. You know, personally, Geez, you know, I love I got three young kids. I got three under five right now. So, you know, spending time with them and teaching them the value of, you know, a hard day's work and building something is early lessons for them. That that I hope they'll carry with them for their lives as well. That's fantastic. Carrying on the the proud receiver tradition and the value of a hard days work and sounds like you're well on your way in that department. Also sounds like you're certainly, you know, with the success you've seen a smart box, well on your way with changing the way a lot of dentists are able to market and do business. So we do just you know. Of course we wish you continued tremendous success. That sounds. Sounds like things have been going fantastic. Again, we've been talking with Callin receivers, the CEO at smart box calling if anyone is interested in finding out more about today's topic. They want to connect with you. They want to find out more about about smart box. What's the best way for them to go about doing that? Yeah, check out our website, smart box dentil Marketingcom, if you want to see that. If you want to drop me an email, it's my first initial left name at GMAILCOM. See Receiver at GMAILCOM. Colin, thank you once again for your time today. It was an absolute pleasure having you on the show. Thanks a lot, Jonathan. Take care. There are lots of ways to build a community and we've chosen to build the be tob growth community through this podcast. But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage with our listeners and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across the country with our listeners and guests. No sales pitches, no agenda, just great conversations with likeminded people. Will Talk Business, we'll talk family, will talk goals and dreams, will...

...build friendships. So if you'd like to be a part of a BOB growth dinner in a sitting near you, go to be to be growth dinnerscom. That's be toob growth dinnerscom. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (1800)