723: 3 Mistakes Startup Sales Teams are Making w/ Paul Doghramji

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Paul Doghramji, Founder of SOAR.

Click here to connect with this guest on LinkedIn.

Are you struggling to come up with original content weekend and week out? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients, let them talk about what they care about most, and never run out of content ideas again. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the B tob growth show, a podcast dedicated to help you be to be executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BOB growth show. Today we're joined by Paul Doug Romgi. Paul is the founder of Sore Paul. Welcome to the show. Thanks so much, Jathan. Great be here. Man, that's a pleasure to have you on the show. I mean, I we've just gotten to to speak briefly offline. I'm already sort of blown away by your enthusiasm and passion for today's subject. We are going to be talking about optimizing sales in startups to create growth, and I think this is going to be a very valuable topic to delve into. You've seen a lot of personal success with sore lately. We were just sort of scratching the surface of that earlier. But before we jump into today's topic again, optimizing sales and start ups to create growth, Paul, maybe you can tell us a little about what you and the sore team are up to these days. Exactly them. So we actually are working on one of our first case studies with small headset company in La called ready Haad go. They do refurbish headsets. They you know, repair them for large enterprise companies, you know, like NBC and universal and larger clients like that that are on the west coast. Is Really Cool. And you know, couple things are helping them do is they have a small fille forces helping them build that up. You know what to look for, how to recruit, you know how to train them, on board them fast so they don't spend too much money there, because they are small company with enterprise clients...

...trying to grow. So we're working at them, focusing on their stills team and optimizing now so that they can grow the right way without spending too much on the on the growing pains. It's going great. That's fantastic. Well, in general, again, one of the one of the reasons we're thrilled to have you on the show today and, Paul, let's just dive right into it here. Number One, the first thing that we were going to be talking about is kind of the main issues that are hindering growth in sales teams. Yep, absolutely, and and that's a great it's a great question. And because one thing in a lot of our research at sort, because what we do is we watch a lot of Webinars, we absorbed a lot of content that's online. You know, it's a fact. You're kind of into our presentation with what we do to optimize and to show that, like, this is a really big issue and this is a reason why stills leaders get the stressed out and have, you know, try to figure out what's going on. And some of these statistics give me the jarring, but they come from combination of force to research, Theso insight they'll tack or of the Harvard Business Reviews. So kind of a culmination of all those. But the first one is that sixty five percent of the sales people's time is spent on non selling activity, right, and when you think about that, your first reaction is no way, that's impossible, that's way too much time. But then I think a second to like, I know, right, it's like there's no way, but think about it for two seconds. And when you think about it and your sales leader, look at your floor. Just look at just watch the floor for like twenty minutes, right, and up sixty five percent of that twenty minute just the how much of their time was that actually on a selling activity, like, and when I say it, selling activity, like talking to a client, prospecting, like organizing your pipeline, like vigorously, not just staring at it and being like I don't know what I'm going to do. You know, which happens. You know, and look at it and look at them and see how many of them on facebook and of them are just on Linkedin and in fact, how many of them are just researching a companies are about to call for a prospect call. You know, that's something that I see a lot in stale teams, is that a lot of these account executives are like will look, listen, I want...

...to be as prepared as possible, so I'm just going to research the heck out of this next company's like, Dude, you have a hundred dials to me you're going to plant you in a research all hundred companies to the bone for each cold call that it's going to result in. God knows what the outcome is. Maybe not mean to get a DM like you know what I'm saying, and that's like a non selling activity. That just them staring at a linkedin. That's not going to preach any better new right. So, when you think about it, it's really an issue that filitators easily fit just by observing their teams a little bit more, just kind of like what's going on and helping them just be a little bit more productive and focus on dealing with the client for rather than just kind of being more prepared, because, I mean, improt there's a lot of sales. You got to be on the go, you got to be smooth, you gotta rock a role. So, you know, just just do it, just jump into it right. Well, now that get one. Let me just let me just ask real quickly then. I mean, so there's got to be some element of preparation then, right. I mean are you just are you kind of making the argument and that you know you can do you can do research until your eyes bleed, but I mean that is still essentially a non sales sort of activity that can be finally tuned, can be what is? What is the solution there? That's a great question, man. And so what I do, or what I've what I've gotten myself to be able to do with the research angle, is prepare everything way ahead of time. If you want to research your stuff, research it on your own time, before you go into work and start prospecting. Do it then, because if you're curious and you want to learn, great, do it on your own time. Number One. Or number two, get your research to capabilities to the point where take you very long. For example, if I don't know something about a company, I'll you know, and I want to learn a little bit more about what they do because I think I'll help me on the call. I'll go right to the website for really just one minute. Just go to be a bank me section. Read really quick. How old they are, what is their main industry like? Do I think they're kind of a contact info in there? Maybe a gym, something a little shorter, name of Mike a...

...day's, you know, instead of a David, you know, some kind of a relatable information for literally just a minute in the room right into the cold call, and that's a maybe if I feel like I need it, if just jump in, because you should know who you're calling ahead of time. You should know what it I mean. Look at the name. You know what I'm saying. Of the businesses. motly gives it away. But use those capability, use your observational skills to a put kind of things together as you're rocking and rolling in your grinding, because that will allow you to kind of do the research, you know, as you do other things. Almost would like the multitasking thing, but if you need more, only take about a minute to absorb that in focus. Mean it's a cold call. You you're trying to set the meeting. You're not trying to do something else, you know, just just that. Okay about it? All right. So these are some of the main issues that are immediately hindering growth in the sales seame, things that you have you have observed firsthand, and we're almost it almost felt like we were sort of touching on this idea of of the data sort of behind the sales seem. Like you said, sixty five percent of the activities being non sales activities, but I would imagine at least part of that is searching through, cataloging, dealing with the data. And so you have a point about about companies understanding how munticulous their data should or should not be. HMM, and that's one thing that I've seen that's really it confuses me because, you know, I've worked for startups have been run by guys you know, like from golden sacks, you know, McKenzie consulting, where their insights, you know, with their stale stacks in their pipelines, just make so much sense. But their numbers tell them exactly where the problems are. And you know, there are other companies that I've worked for and you know it's sore and even on my own and my personal career, where they track things. Like I'll look at their stale teams and it's like, Yep, these are their dials and you know, their meetings and their closing and their clothes deals. Like where's everything else? So like what everything else? What else should we track? It's like, well, listen, how do you know how many dams they're reaching? It's like, well, they're...

...getting meeting sets, but that's kind of the same thing. It's not kind of the same thing. You don't know what if they're getting to a bunch of decision makers and they're striking out all over the place and they're not getting into meeting set. Let the bad sales for spels, not just someone that need some coaching in a certain part of the sales stacks, certain part in the pipeline. You know, and I've seen companies where that when they when they know that that data is there and they just tend to that rep and you know, I've seen some amazing sales managers find that out, see the insights go and tend to that and then just fixing that one little thing turns like a rept that has a broken wheel or a broken leg written to a top, you know, top one percent type person. And that's what takes the sales people, like, you know, the sales teams, from kind of leveling out and going down and not being super consistent to having reps that are passionate and just skyrocketing. You know, that's the other thing too, is that not understanding your inside can lead to more turnover. For example, if they you didn't understand that, if you track that stuff, you'd say, Hey, my sales people aren't that great, maybe we should just clean house what's not the case. You just don't know because you're not tracking it deep enough, you know, and it can go deeper than that, you know, all the way down to even no answer. How many no answers are you getting? How many gatekeepers are you getting? How many gatekeeper conversations are you getting? You know, to know all of that stuff just so you understand exactly what each person, when your team, is doing and then, if you're on a vice present level or executive level, exactly what's going on with each one of your teams, you know, on even more of a grand new level of those reports at the end of the day, for executive and even the managers, even the sales people, should have those so everyone's the lines, everyone on the same page with WHO's doing what, and that way you guys can all use the data and just grow, you know, and the number one thing before anybody can go out is to stay consistent. And you know lack of consistency is another thing, but that in there. Yeah, it makes a lot of sense talking about like you don't you don't have a this isn't just a bad sales rep there is, you know, there could be just one thing that you that you need to fact you...

...have the data and be able to dive into it. You'd be able to put you know, instead of rank starting from scratch, which is like you know what, what a waste, what not, and then not even just what a waste, but like what a missed opportunity to like you said, that absoctly ninety percent of the way there and just needs a little bit of fine tuning. But I am curious, because I am fascinated by this idea that, you know, there is so much day, that there are so many metrics, there are so many things that we have the capability to track and at the end of the day, there are also just so many hours that we can utilize. Do you have that? Do you ever find that there are when it comes to meticulous data? Do you ever find that there are things, metrics, statistics, pieces of data that people tend to get hung up on that maybe they shouldn't, that maybe there aren't like more important things to be thinking about? You know, that's the thing. I've never really noticed that to be that much of an issue, where someone's focusing on the wrong part of data. Only the only time I've seen that is when they just track like I said, a to vague or general view, like dials in general, not like no, DM's no answer. You know, Lee, fresh lead, you know this, that whatever. Like without tracking that, it's just they get hung up on I don't see a conversion from, you know, meetings to closes. It's like well, you know. And then they get obsessed with the close rates. You know, if it's anything, it's just closed. Right. Everyone's always obsessed with clothes rate. You know, when you try, everyone's obsessed with that. But when you think about what goes into it, it's got if you just track your data a little bit harder, a little bit more, you spread it up, create new things, be like okay, think about the experience. Okay, what's going in and prospecting? Well, you know what? We actually talked through a gatekeeper, but also a reception is. That's not really the gatekeeper in our line of work. Clean know what, maybe we should track it out of how many receptions it's we're getting. Maybe our leads go right only to reception it we can't get past them. Maybe we should try a different avenue. That is like a whole world of thought that just came and you...

...can't even create a new metric for yourself. That may make it so much easier on your still teams, in your leaders just right there that, like you know that that can really just change the game. Yeah, you know, and help you understand why you're hung up on one thing. Right, people don't you know? People don't do that. They get hung up the guests that I'm just close, right, just glass, just to close, right. It's but it's BUDD's higher. Yeah, yeah, but it's deeper than that. It's you can yet be more meticulous than that. You got to pay attention to the to these main issues that are hindering growth in your sales team. And I know that you had just very briefly mentioned the the sales tack and the idea that you know that that's what you need. You need to optimize your sales tack, but I know you have it or you have a couple of thoughts on that as well. Absolutely so, like the sales stack is so important and it's one of the things it's a turn US thrown around. I don't think a lot of people understand because it's kind of new and I didn't even understand it. I had to look it up and research at myself. I heard first like on sales tacker, but the sales stack is a pipeline basically, but it also includes the lead, jen the lead in part, and one of the biggest things that I see companies doing that could save them so much money if they just understood how to do this, would be internalized their lead Gien. For example, website scraping is a thing. You can literally use chrome extends or get a sale higher. A sales engineer, not someone to help you with the hardware of sfe know, some guy that you know actually code can scrape the website, can go to your targets, you know, really kind of like a satellite in the sky, kind of due for the Internet right to just kind of save the target and compile them into excel spreadsheets. That is so much cheaper than spending tons of money on list and doing trial and error and doing the whole firme book method type deal with the prospecting. You know, Internalizing Legion can help you understand so many more insights and can lead to the creating the metrics that you'll need to, you know, get deeper understanding and deeper insights into your each...

...one of your you know, sales people's stacks, each one of their pipelines, and so you can understand how to help them a lot better. So internalizing LEA general really really take optimizing your organization to the next level. But a lot of people don't know how to do it and a lot of people don't know that, you know, those kind of rules exist because the sales engineer, I mean I've seen two totally different kinds of sales engineers and they do tot totally different things. I've seen one type of sales engineer work to help, you know, install certain things, like a sales support and then I've seen another type of sales engineer who works closely with marketing to generate leads. Right. So it depends on what the understanding is in your organization. But if you get one of the you know, a sales engineer in your org to start, you know, coding through the Internet, scraping, you know, leads, you know, getting specific data, enriching those leads with better insights, I mean you can necessarily take their bad data with your leads all the way down to zero percent and I imagine that if you have any percentage at all in your company with your repts, a bad data. This will save so, so much time and money. It's ridiculous. And that right there will help you grow because you can allocate that cost you're spending on tons and tons of leads probably just go nowhere. Yeah, to other things like your boom. That's fantastic, Paul. You know you making a lot of sense and I said at the very beginning, you know, it's just I love having guests on the show that are enthusiastic and passionate about what they're doing. You've obviously seen a lot of success recently with with sore, which is fantastic. And and here's a question that we have been asking a lot of our guests this year, and you as you as a founder, you as sort of a leader. We we've been curious about this idea of legacy and I'd like to ask you sort of what you are hoping your legacy is...

...going to be at the end of the day, whether that is personal, professional or even a combination of the two. That, Johnathan, is awesome question and this kind of circles right into the reason why me and you know, some of my older stills friends started sore, because which the name literally is, fails optimizations analytics and Resources Right, which is what we is all in the kind of in the name. But we saw a need because we work for a start up, you know, like in the beginning of our careers, and we really grew close together because when you're going to start to fight for funding, you fight to keep your job, basically, and that create a lot of cohesion between you and your teammates in the trenches in this and that. And when we got out of it, we moved on and we all became in leader positions and grew in our careers. We saw, like a lot of startups we worked for, making kinds of mistakes and having great ideas, like such awesome ideas, but they made just like dumb mistakes, like they didn't internalize the llegiance that so much money on that, some money on marketing. They didn't have to tip risks where they didn't have to this and that. When they could, you just ask or listened or had better collaboration or something. And so what we did was we decided to get together and say, you know what, let's go, and I mean we're amazing still people, we can sell ourselves against other. Let's go and help these guys out let's go show them what to do. Let's go show them that there needs to be more data than you done. This baby's be done this way, not in really a consulting way, but like optimize the Leers, like a guys, look, check this out. What do you think of this? I'm kind of like make a plan and then help them put it into place with them based on what they've got, which is how the swart method kind of works in the wife and five steps. You can go check that out on the website. But US giving back, you know, to the startups and, you know, maybe help save an idea that could really make a really big impact on, you know, some industry or even the rest of the world. Is exactly what we want to leave behind. I want to leave behind in my legacy, which is why I starting sore. And then, you know that everybody else involved, because that's something that...

I mean, I've just seen some ideas die. That could be awesome, but you know, mistakes happened that way. So hopefully we'll be able to help some help some awesome companies out, you know, and really just make a difference, man. That's what we can leave behind. Yeah, yeah, I mean it's a brilliant legacy and to make you know, I just even love the way that you sort of phrase that, you know, like save an idea, and there are some ideas out there with startups that could definitely change the world and if they just sort of you know, having a good idea isn't necessarily enough. You got to be you got to you got to make the right decisions to, you know, to make it profitable, to make it marketable to me, to sell it, you know, and I so I think that's I think that's fantastic. It's a fantastic legacy. Paul, thank you again so much for coming on here sharing your wisdom with with me, with our our listeners. If anyone is interested in following up with you, they want to find out more about today's topic, they want to find out more about sore, they want to find out more about you. What's the best way for them to go about doing that? Absolutely so you can just church me on Linkedin all the drum jee but with the junior, because my dad and I do have the same name, but you'll know, you'll know that he's not me. He looks a lot older, he has a black mustache. You know, a lot different. You don't put doctor, so you know I'm not one of those three defining how but you can look at on Linkedin or you can check out our website, soce salescom, that Sare Salecom, or just feel pret email me at your questions, you want to try about anything. Just want to talk with some advice at Paul at for Salecom and to ask it. Will definitely have sour salescom in the show notes. Paul, thank you again so much for your time today. It was a absolute pleasure. I thank you, Jonathan Aslete, that I really appreciate it. Thanks for having me. There are lots of ways to build a community and we've chosen to build the BEDB growth community through this podcast. But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage...

...with our listeners and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across the country with our listeners and guests. No sales pitches, no agenda, just great conversations with likeminded people. Will Talk Business, we'll talk family, will talk goals and dreams, will build friendships. So if you'd like to be a part of a BB growth dinner in a city near you, go to be tob growth dinnerscom. That's be tob growth dinnerscom. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (1778)