718: From Ellen to Sellin': 3 Keys to Grow Revenue 20% Month Per Month w/ Dailius Wilson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Dailius Wilson, VP Sales & Growth at GetAccept.

Click here to connect with this guest on LinkedIn.

Are you struggling to come up with original content weekend and week out? Start a podcast. Interview your ideal clients, let them talk about what they care about most and never run out of content ideas again. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the B tob growth show, a podcast dedicated to helping betb executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BB growth show. This episode is sponsored by Directive Consulting, the B Tob Search Marketing Agency. We are here today with day loose Wilson. He is the VP of sales and growth at get, except he also goes by dw. saw the attempt to not butcher his name there. Assist interview. Our firdom is dw. So, dw, how are you doing today? Right, you did well, James. That makes me feel grid off the bat, awesome. And and so we're going to be talking today, dw, about a little bit of your your story. So the headline of the episode is going to be you know, obviously from Ellen to selling. Anybody listening already saw it. But really the meat of this episode. Ellen is a part of your story, but the men of this episode is going to be how you have helped grow revenue twenty percent month over month for the last six months, which I think is incredibly impressive. But before we get into that, the company that you've done that for is a company called get accept, and I want to get our listeners to have just a little bit of an idea of what get accept is, what you guys are up to over there before we dive into to your story and this three part a framework that you've got for growing revenue month over month like that. Fantastic. Thanks for the opportunity to share what get accept does briefly. We've all faced the problem in sales where we feel that our deals go dark. So what get accept focuses...

...on is getting you the ability to accelerate your sales cycles and to make a really engaging journey for your prospects to go through. And in fact we have so many tools built in, from a signing to quoting to video, you may not need many of the tools use today, which is exciting. I love it. So, dw I, before we dive into the three points that we're going to cover today on how you've specifically grown revenue twenty percent month over month, you've got a bit of an interesting background. That Involves Ellen Degeneres. Can you can you give listeners just a bit of that story, because I think it's I think it's just fun. So I don't know that has anything to do with growing revenue month over month, but it's a super fun story. So so can you share that with US real quick? Well, it I think it has something to do with growing twitter and facebook's store. stikkers. That that's a story for another time. I think for my brother and I was an amazing journey. We want to contest doing a little bit of amateur singing, which was terrible if you see that online, and initially they wanted us to be in the audience, but they found out about us and and liked ourt vibe together, so we ended up going on the show and actually we're contracted to warner brothers for a time. So it was amazing to learn about the INS and outs of show Biz. But I'm definitely the the worst guy ever to make it to Hollywood. I don't know how that ever happened. I love it, man. So as you were telling me that offline, I thought, well, that is that is a fantastic story. That is we're sharing. So if you want to learn more of that, you could reach out to dw on on Linkedin or twitter. Just don't stock in there and and you might get a response. So the w are the first point that that we talked about. You know. Actually, before we get into the first point, give us a little bit of context. So you joined the get except team last November and so that first month you didn't quite get to twenty percent growth, but starting the very next month...

...you have seen twenty percent growth in revenue every month until now. We're recording this in June. Can you give us just a little bit more context on that before we dive into the three things that you attribute to being the reason for that growth? Yeah, it's super scary coming into a new role, especially leading cell as a marketing because in a younger company you definitely feel that you have three to six months to make that impact on the business. If you're given any more than that and you're not hitting results, they're they're being overly generous. So in the back of my mind. I want to bring results to the table, but particularly people who come from larger firms and an as familiar with the agile goals of younger companies. You can't take that time to analyze things too much because then you get no results. So the kind of days of taking three months to make a yearly plan and are hoping for the best after that are not possible when you have huge growth targets like we do here. Get accept got okay. So diving into is. We were talking through this. You said there's really been three key factors that have really been, you know, the things that have allowed you to experience this kind of growth. You said the first one is customer proof. Can you talk to us about elaborate on that idea for us and why it's so crucial? Yeah, I think there's two pervasive themes. The first is that as a younger business, you lack the trust and credibility of larger companies, don't you with less market awareness and also, if you haven't been established long enough, people look at your linkedin to see what how many employees you have, which can be alarming for younger companies. So that's one kill that we need to surmount. The other one is that be to best buying has changed and that's kind of gone from B Toc Consumer Patterns where people do research and their very self oriented in their buying patterns. So, given that, you need to...

...be present on other venues other than your own website in order to attract interest and build credibility, and so have there been like what have been the specific things that you guys have done to proactively focus on customer proof? Yeah, so, coming from my last role, I work for one of the leaders in this field, cull trust radius and the BAB space. So I worked with some of the top companies and in the world, helping pioneer their sales and marketing strategy with with respect to advocacy. So what I felt coming into this role was I could use some of those nuggets of wisdom and help us as a brand who probably had ten to twelve reviews in title on all the different platforms, and I wanted to scale what our customers said about us and in a really authentic manner. So we've chosen to focus on a number of these venues online in order to generate that and it also has trickle on effects with a number of other benefits. So it's trustory, is a platform where a customer can input a review and then it goes to several other review sites. Or is it? Is it a little bit different. Yeah, so trust radius is a direct portal in that the content you're right there, remains on trust radius. But we've seen results from a number of different platforms, including trust radius, get crowd and the gardener properties. If the listeners are not aware, gardener now owns many of the be to be websites to do with opinion and sentiment, and we feel that it's important to build a spectrum of content. But at the same time you want to make sure that when you're doing this, that the content you're generating is good enough to use in your own sales and marketing, because that's where the job is done, isn't it? You might be able to get them in the door, but if you don't have any content to foster nurture them, then you reach a point...

...in the sales cycle where it ends. And so what have you guys done, or were they're specific things that you guys did to engage your customers so that they started leaving? Leaving these reviews essentially giving you guys, the the customer proof that you needed. Yeah, and what we find is that normally to generate hand raises. If you look, if you imagine a normal distribution or some people call that a bell curve of sentiment for say, a be to be product, normally you have on the far right, super advocates and on the far left super detractors. So what the challenge is for a modern organization is to debate that Middle Section, which I call, you know, your silent customers. They might be happy but they've never come to the surface with those views. So normally people are pay them an incentive. A Gift Card is typically the main method. But for us we found that using statistical analysis to find the customers who are more likely to be the ones that we're going to speak up was helpful. So we looked at patterns of usage in the site, time they've spent as a customer, whether they've referred other customers. There were many inputs to that model. But to get away from all that technical stuff, we were able to find the people who loved us but may not have said so before, and channel them into saying parts of our story, which was strategic for us. And did you guys focus on one platform at a time in terms of trust radius, or get crowd so that you could build up all those different channels, or have you stayed focused on on specifically one channel? Yeah, I think right now the main channel which we focused on more than the rest, which is a typical to what people would advise, is our own channel. So what that means is using feedback and surveys to generate the content at scale. And many critics and the bet...

...to be marketing and sales world may may say, Hey, dw will, that contents not credible, but to be honest, all the platforms have strengths and weaknesses when it too it comes to generating this and helping you do so. So what I felt was generating a really scaled body of content internally is the first step, and then helping our customers take some of those sound bites and put them on the third party sites is more the secondary action. Interesting. Was that something that you learned kind of from experience in previous companies? You're right, I think that is very atypical. What was it that that made you realize that that was actually the way to go? It's a combination of a few things. I think the most important one was that we wanted to reduce friction. So many, many other third party solutions have to require logins. Also, they may not even if these companies are building their brands, they may not know them yet. Also, I wanted to make the engagement, and we'll talk about this later as well. With my third point, is make it seem like a conversation between two parties rather than an off page or out of APP experience. And we had a lot of success using live chat, which was a hypothesis I've had for some time that you can generate customer proof points from live chat a lot more effectively than email, and that's some of the the secret source. James, you make me tell all the secrets and then we'll be out of business. I love it so so dw that. So, customer proof being the first thing that you are one of the first things that you focused on to achieve the growth that you guys have experienced. The second one you talked about offline is response time. You specifically mentioned a five minute window. Talk to us about this. I mean there's so much debate about this and people go well, if I'm called to...

...promptly, it seems like it's over pedantic and the business wants my business too much and they're they're kind of death fert right. Have you ever heard that, James? Yeah, I feel like that's I don't know that I've heard it a whole lot, but it's definitely a sentiment that I've heard before. Yeah, so I think response time has a number of key tenants. I think the first one is that we want to stick between that one to five minute window. All the evidence I've seen is conducive to the fact that that is successful, because all your competitors are not getting there that quickly. The second is, what's the merit of that touch point? Are you actually coming to the customer with quality information or is it just a call to say thanks for signing up? Right? So, even if you are quick, it may not be efficacious if you're not coming to the table with value. So in order to improve that, I'm very big on using, say, what we talked about in point one, some of those proof points in those stories to start a conversation. Then I think with response time, many people think about it in kind of a mono channel sense that they think I sent them an email or I called them and I got a voicemail. That's my response. Time done. What you want to do is you know, I'm Australian. I love the great outdoors and I love sharks and I also I think of a hammahead shock. You know, those things come at you a hundred miles an hour if you're out in the surf. So for my team's I want them to be hammer heads in the way that they're hitting three, four, five potential avenues to engage that person in the first attempt. So linkedin add perhaps they might send a little tweet welcoming them, maybe they'll give them a call. So when you make that three to five, they start to feel like this company's quite switched on, versus there a little overbearing. I've only had good feedback from this approach. All Right, today's gross story revolves...

...around search engine marketing and will be shining the spotlight on ages software, a company that makes software for manufacturing operations. Ages was one of the first companies in their space to invest in search marketing, but its competition grew their performance plateaued. To counter this, they hired directive consulting, the BTB Search Marketing Agency with unparalleled experience in in Bent Leygen for bdb companies, directive was able to increase ages as monthly the online leads by four hundred and fifty seven percent, while at the same time lowering their costpro lead by a hundred and forty seven percent. I have a hunch that directive can get these kind of results tree too. So head over to directive consultingcom and request a totally free custom proposal. That's directive consultingcom. All right, let's get back to this interview. All right, dw this third one that you alluded to earlier. The third key to the growth that you guys have seen is humanizing communications. I hear a lot of people talk about personalization, but explain what humanizing communications looks like. Yeah, and I think one aspect is you know, I'm one of the most boring, average guys in the world, but you humanize me, didn't you? James had that Ellen Story and and that's something you need to me. So personalization, in my opinion, refers to trying to connect with the prospect based on their interest so or elements of their history. Was humanizing the conversation has two key aspects. The first is that you're giving something of your self and to elaborate further. Talk about implicit and explicit information. So, for instance, if you say, Hey, James, I read online and I saw you like basketball, I like postball to then what is that will for the listeners? That's explicit. You're telling them, but implicit...

...is when you say, Hey, James, I was watching the basketball on Sunday. Little Sad about what happened with the game dot dot dot. That is inviting the prospect then to talk to you, which I think is something really, you know, powerful. And then my other point within this humanizing debate is, you know, put something forward that's unique or intertwine that in your communications and try and try and make them business in terms of structure and etiquette, but blend in that approach. That is going to differentiate you from the monster companies who lost touch and don't know how to communicate with their customers so effectively. I love that. I think honestly, it's a big reason why you and I were talking offline a little bit about linkedin. But I think that's why you're seeing a lot of these kind of selfie videos do really, really well, because they're they're humanizing the faces behind a lot of these beautyb companies that are starting to embrace video on Linkedin. I'm a huge fan of humanizing conversation, humanizing communication, particularly in the way that we do email. I love your point about implicit versus explicit. So when you're doing that, is is the key there. Dw to not so you don't want to specifically ask them a question, or you don't want to lead in with that implicit statement and then say want to do a demo next week, you're just kind of leading it so that they're compelled to engage in a conversation without you directly making an ass there, and I understand that right. Yeah, and it's super hard to perfect. I think the the kind of analogy that I often say is like it's a difference between a Cheetah and a zebra in sales and marketing. Everyone knows when they're being hunted and that's the Cheetah kind of...

...metaphor, but as Zebra is curious and you know they stand out in the wild. And so you want to draw someone's mind into that conversation with you. And don't get me wrong, there's there's nothing wrong with saying hey, I saw you went to x university, because something like that is, you know, pretty standard. But for instance, if I'm a family orientated person and I saw an anecdote about my father, who I love a lot, at my mother, you know that I'm not asking them do they have kids? They might just tell me, Oh yeah, I'm close to my mother and father of two kids as well. So it's, I think, just pivoting from being too much on the front foot to being open to experimenting with going on the back foot and showing vulnerability. And these companies, you know, and I hate to be one of these younger people who uses terrible word Sol avoid doing so now, but they're very non strategic with how they try to humanize themselves. Have you ever watched one of those be tob videos that shows about that office culture and it looks like a bunch of Nerds, you know, having a good time by a desk? Right? People see through that and the art to sales, of marketing and building a strong company is when your culture truly comes from the core and resonates and and that is what I mean by this humanizing movement. So get accept people who go through ourselves process will see that firsthand. I love it. Dw this has been fantastic. I think you've shared a few different nuggets in here that I hope people really latch on to. The entire episode has been incredible, though. If there's somebody they want to stay connected with you, they want to learn more about get accept. What's the best way for them to go about doing that? Yeah, well, there's two ways. One, if you want more nuggets, I've been watching Youkon gold on Netflix. It's a great series. You should get into that. The second one is my email is a d for Dog AF, for Robert W, for William drw at get acceptcom,...

...and that's otherwise, just find me on linkedin unforced less. Spend a lot of time on there and my girlfriend's quite angry with me these days. figure out what to do. I love author dw. My wife gives me a similar hard time. So I've definitely been there and experience that. This is again, this has been incredible. If you're listening to this, connect with the W and check out what they're doing it get accept. Thank you so much for your time, man, I really appreciate it. Thank you and Cape listening to the shot. It brought me from a small town in Australia all the way to America, they say inside times. I've loved it since the beginning. Thank you. You're a way to kind man. Thank you so much. There are lots of ways to build a community and we've chosen to build the BEB growth community through this podcast. But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage with our listeners, and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across the country with our listeners and guests. No sales pitches, no agenda, just great conversations with likeminded people. Will Talk Business, will talk family, will talk goals and dreams, will build friendships. So if you'd like to be a part of a BB growth dinner in a sitting near you, go to be tob growth dinnerscom. That's be tob growth dinnerscom. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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