714: From Freelancer to Inc 5000: How a Sharing Mentality Took This Founder to the Top w/ Neeraj Singh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Neeraj Singh, Founder & CEO of Big Binary.

Click here to connect with this guest on LinkedIn.

Looking for a guaranteed way to create content that resonates with your audience? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients and let them choose the topic of the interview, because if your ideal clients care about the topic, there's a good chance the rest of your audience will care about it too. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the Bob Growth Show, podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources? You've come to the right place. I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carberry. Let's get it into the show. This episode is sponsored by Directive Consulting, the B Tob Search Marketing Agency. Like to welcome to the show. In your age, seeing the founder and CEO a big binary your Ayes. Welcome. We're really excited to have you on the show today. Thanks. Thanks for me yeah, absolutely so. Recently you are awarded e Fivezero recognize you as one of the fastest growing companies. This is a really exciting achievement for you guys. Congratulations on that. Thank you very much. So today we're going to dig into a little bit of how you've achieved that growth what you're looking at doing in the future. But why do you give us a little bit of a background on what's big binary? Where do you guys come from and who you help? So big binary is above and mobile consulting company. We primarily build a custom above applications and mobile applications for our clients. We come from a technomode, of a technology background. I was a strong contributor to who be on rails, which is a technology used to build above applications, and after certain contributions to the ruby on rails open source ecosystem, I was able to quit my full time job and start started freelancing and from there I got a few clients and then we kept adding one more clients. So this, this whole thing really started with you...

...kind of as a solo purdewer, starting everything as a consultant and then grow from the you group from there. Absolutely, that's fantastic. What a what a good story for those of us who are looking at the ninety five and two truck on full time, and that's great. I noticed looking at your linkedin profile, looking at the things that the company believes and you have a really strong emphasis on three different things distributed workforce, open source culture and share learning. So there's this kind of idea that we're all this big global community, we should be helping each other. How is that impacted you guys grow? So when I talk about the distributor, is not that much in terms of help, because I try to separate the business from personal life. If business helps, that's great, but that to me is not necessarily at last the businesses that I'm talking about one person, two person, three person company that we will leave that to big companies like IBM and Google for helping people out. What we are trying to do is here is try to find work in a way so that we can have a meaningful life at last. Work from the perspective of the person who's trying to start the company there goes back into the culture of the team that you're building there's are right. Yeah, absolutely so. With the advancement in the technology, there are certain things which have made a become available now which will not available ten, fifteen, twenty years ago, and one of them is building software products. If you're trying to build a software product, I feel like twenty percent of the time you spend or maybe thirty percent earlier in the phase of the software development trying to understand what you need to build. So there is a time to understand what it put and there's a time for bully, but the time for building it's pretty I feel like it's a it's not as much collaborative work as people like to think, especially I'm talking once again from the perspective of a small team, five written people. Sure there is a view of forth need to sink and sink with the our team members who's working on what, but after that go back to your cave and just do the work and from that perspective you...

...don't have to be in the office all the time. And the other reason is that all the companies say that they want to hire the very best, but at the same time they say that you have to come to the office. And what are your actually they're trying to say is that you're trying to have the very best people who are within the one our distance from that office. Yep, so then this way you're limiting yourself. That's in just saying. I think this is a more common movement as we advance in technology make it easier for folks like H and I have a conversation over, you know, zoom meeting or Uber Conference. It makes it so much easier for that collaborative effort and it sounds like that's been a big contributor to the way that you guys are growing your team today. Now, as you're talking about, you know, the way that you look at building a software application, it's similar to the way that we develop other products in that you're having to assess what exactly is it? You know you said probably thirty percent of your time spent assessing what exactly you need to build, what's the necessary parts, and then going and doing it. Is the rest of the activity and maybe assessing at the end, I'd imagine. But you mentioned before we started to interview here, you mentioned that generally speaking, only twenty percent of the features matter eighty percent of the time. Now this is the PARRETTO principle. We hear a lot about. What does that mean, maybe from your product development standpoint? What does that really mean to you guys? What it means to us? Let's talk about what it means to our clients there, because that I can to get big. BINALTY is a client services company. So when we look at products and we look at our clients. Most of our plants that either is starting up and they have no software applications or they have a software application which is being used by midlevel people and it still has ways to grow. It has not yet quite reached the maturity level. That's most of our products. Eighty percent of our products are in that category where they are growing.

So when they are growing, at that time every new start up exist or once that succeed, they succeed because they have some core value. Now let's take an example or something like Google Doc. Okay, the tons of things that you can do in the Google Doc, but one of the core valuces that you can collaborate lively and easily. Just web ray solution. You can type, sure, and there are other terms of things. In fact, it's so funny that Microsoft Word Team, or of his team, every year they conduct the survey to find out what are the other features that you need, and I think couple of years ago they had probably posted on twitter that hey, ninety percent of the things people are finding that's already there in the Microsoft world and I don't see how that's a that's a happy situation for them. Yeah, so what I mean to say is that twenty percent of the features of Word is used by eighty percent on any percent of the people. Once in a while you need to do something which is a little bit far in the corner. So what we try to do when we deal with the clients. The we are a little bit in a difficulty Suation, because the clients hire us when they think that they know what needs to be done. Sure, and they have the full scriptop, okay, the twelopment company will come. This is like three to six months of work and then they are done and then we start asking the questions. So some, some of the clients, they could annoy it a little bit because they think that they have figured everything out and then we say that that's great, let's just talk, so that I would ask some hard questions, so that it further depends your belief in what you're doing. Another couple of hours of a call will not should not do any harm. And then we ask, ask questions and we discover that, okay, that's that they need to make some changes in their Friday list. And talk about the list. Let's say that they have one they want to hit the market in three months from now and they have...

...handed thirty items in their list to me, where after running the business for a number of years. The Way I see the problem is that they treat all hundred thirty items in their Ja list with equal weight each. They just see that hundred and thirty the block and they look at the number. Thirty percent, then forty percent done in their weekly report, and I feel like that's wrong way to look at it, because all hundred thirty features are not of the same priority. Now that's what that applies to so many elements of business, not just in productive augment. Certainly you know as you're looking at program in these things, but from a macro level you look at the business, how many things need to get done, but really, what's the priority? I like it goes back to that the twenty percent of a meeting to get done first. What are the real key features there? I think that's a fascinating way to look at not just the productive lumb kind of zooming out from there, looking at the business as a whole. Yeah, but in reality, once you go inside, it's a little bit even if, let's set the technology team or the city of that company comes on board with this idea that, yes, yes, you're right, Hunt Lot, let's say, out a hundred thirty, sixty of them are in phase one and phase two. When we have meetings with the domain experts on the business team, sales team, they are looking at things from their perspective. Sure so the sales guy does not like it at all, marketing people don't like it. The domain expert to say what know, we need to have this feature in phase but absolutely must be there. So so everybody's coming at it from their perspective. And what we need to do is the culture in the company. That's where it comes in, like what is the culture? We need to educate. We must educate the sales team, marketing team that yes, we will get to those features, but at any point, at any time, on week one, week to we cannot be working on all hundred and thirty of them. Sure so the constant prioritization like which one do you need? Which one we are working and as the software builds, time, mean time.

We have seen like but it's a Geeta or trevel and whatnot. When we come in. Then a hundred thirty of them and then six months later we look back and half of them we have not touched. Why? Because new things have come up, sure, and and I like that. Some people are very rigid about it. I like it because why the new things have come up? Because as we are bullying the software, they look at it and they say, yes, yes, this is a that's do this and let's deprioritize this, so this thing automatically happens. But we just try to push them even further in saying that do not look at it one hundred thirty with the same fire. All Right, today's growth story revolves around search engine marketing and will be shining the spotlight on ages software, a company that makes software for manufacturing operations. Ages was one of the first companies in their space to invest in search marketing, but as competition grew, their performance plateaued. To counter this, they hired directive consulting, the BTB Search Marketing Agency with unparalleled experience in in bent legend. For BDB companies, directive was able to increase ages as monthly online leads by four hundred and fifty seven percent, while at the same time lowering their cost per lead by a hundred and forty seven percent. I have a hunch that directive can get these kind of results three too. So head over to directive consultingcom and request a totally free custom proposal. That's directive consultingcom. All right, let's get back to this interview. Well, I think this is this is another point that you raise earlier as we were kind of talking pre show here. You mentioned that you guys don't just do things because it's always been done that way or because the client thinks it should be done that way. It sounds like your approach is to simply educate the client. You come in as the expert in building the solution that they want. But I think you also take a very careful TAC it sounds like, rather than challenging them and say no, no, you're wrong, it's hey, let's have a conversation about it. It will just firm...

...up your belief and really, in the end everybody kind of learns together. I think that's a great approach. Absolutely the best way to get things done is by getting their dead vote. Sure, if you're time to why they're dealing with Kate's all. You're dealing with your friends, are you have the boss. If you go with the strong approach, then people will do it, but they might not, and it's important that people need to understand why we are doing that, because in this Wiste lilwly they will be educated and now the whole team will be in one place of thing. And one of the hardest problems that I've seen is that just the lesson that we type to. For example, let's start to be a giving that demo and there's a log in page, the log in page. We want to get to the meat of the stuff, which is something else. If it's a crm solution, that okay. We want to get to the crum. Just pass the lock in. If we don't pay much attention, and in the demo, either sales marketing, our business development, somebody will say they oh, why cannot belong in through facebook? Why kind of belog in using linkedin or Gmail and things like that, and our thing is that, yes, those will be added, but that is not the focus right now. For this week. We keep with refer to the last start, say that okay, this week one is the top prity every hour to our counts, like because we have some tickets on the medium size complex be some small, but we can handle only these many small and but then they ask that is it hard? And being the technology that I say no, it's easy, but then I need to tell them that don't confuse easy with being productive. That's key. Yeah, yeah, there are so many easy things we can do. We can change, we can let use that. Change the color of the TAB, sure, of all the buttons. Is that important? Maybe, because it should match with your plan. But in this week, should we be...

...doing it that? That is a question. So that's why I see that easy is does not necessarily mean that productive. And and just because it's hard does not also mean that productive. What is productive is what will sell your software. What is the right thing to do this week, this month? And I've got to imagine that that same mentality of productive rather than easy first has led you guys to to the stink five thousand award, I mean to get recognized as one of the fastest growing companies, requires that you put the productive things first, that you be one of those top producing organizations. Is that the mentality that you take? I mean internally as well as externally. Absolutely, we have to. Otherwise we would not be able to do a good job to our client. And we, as a service company, we are able to grow only if our client grows. Sure so, in a way, it's a good thing support. A lot of people think that's a constraint, but I feel that's a good constraint. Like so that forces us to always think what's good for the client. One of the hardest things is acquiring your customers. So we can do we can have two strategies. They're only two strategies, but a consulting companies to grow. Either you suck the blood of your client, you take all the money that you can take and then go to the client B and then to the client see all you can have a client which we can help grow and if the client grows, is growing and they are doing good prisoners, they having good revenue, then the last thing they want to do is switch their technology partner. Sure, so, so, that's why. So we take and the other thing is that I believe in whatever you do more of you will get better at that. If you want to, if you want if you keep sucking the blood out of the client and your strategy is to move from client a to client beef, whatever happens to client yeah, I don't care. You will get better. I will get better at speaking all the money and moving to the next...

...client. There's no doubt about that. But I don't want to get better at that. Because why? Because tomorrow, if, let's say, I try to build an Internet product, I have not built that skill, not that mental model. So we try to take the client project and think of it as if it's our project. If we are in the startup case we are doing that, what would we do? There are Chan and just and that helps us be, I feel like that helps us be more aligned with the success of the client. Yeah, I think there's a fantastic attitude. I think the key there is that you get the people who you've brought into the company since you were the only person in it, and those people who you've brought along have been in agreement with that. They hear, they've understood that that's the way you do business as a company. I mean that's that's great that you've been able to bring those folks on board who are going to help support that mission, or at least you know that value that you hold deer, and obviously that's doing good things for your company. I love to hear that people doing the right thing by their client are growing and are getting recognized by growth. So I think congratulations, your arge. There's are you are some really great points. Where can people find more about the binary, about the things that you guys are doing today? I think the best press may to be on twitter. Learning pulls to but that the company outbates on twitter. So after to handle his big finally, awesome, perfect. Well there as we appreciate you coming on the show today. Thank you again for your insights here. Congratulations once again on your in Fivezero achievement and we look forward to seeing great things for you guys in the future. So thank you and it close good to be on this show. There are lots of ways to build a community and we've chosen to build the bed to be growth community through this podcast. But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage with our listeners, and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across...

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