708: 5 Things to Help You Develop a High Performing Team w/ Paul David

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Paul David, Founder and CEO of Identified Talent Solutions.

Click here to connect with this guest on LinkedIn.

Are you struggling to come up with original content weekend and week out? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients, let them talk about what they care about most and never run out of content ideas again. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the B tob growth show, a podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BB growth show. This episode is sponsored by Directive Consulting, the B Tob Search Marketing Agency. Today we are joined by Paul David Paul, the founder and CEO and identified talent solutions. Paul, welcome to the show. Hey, thanks for having me. Thank you so much for joining us, carbonet a little time today. We're going to be talking today about developing a high performing team and we've got some great notes. We got some great points that we're going to get to, but before we do, Paul, maybe you can tell us a little about what your team, identified talent solutions is up to these days. Yeah, so what we basically do is we're a human resource recruitment consulting company. So we do multiple different verticals between like, you know, traditional staffing, where we have contingent placement, direct hires, executive search, temporary and contract hires, which is the traditional swimline. We also do retain search and also full outsourcing of recruitment departments with midsize companies that want to scale their recruitment departments pretty fast. So you know, we're not we're rather a boutique company. We like to stay small and Nimble, so we can provide a lot of solutions or we provide different solutions to our customers needs from a talent to acquisition perspective. Now, well, and I know that you're very effective at what you do. It's one of the reasons that we were so lucky to get you on the show today. You've put...

...together obviously a high performing teams. We're really talking about really how you can go about developing your own high performing team and at least part of the journey that you have seen in the success that you've seen. So, Paul, I think we're going to we're going to start with this idea of hiring correctly and you know kind of where you see other companies, what they do and what their priorities are versus what your priorities have been. Sure, sure, absolutely, I mean I can I can talk from I mean, you know what I've been in the industry for last thirteen, fourteen years and I think hiring strategies for the different size company on your goals are very different. If you're a very large, complex multinational company, hiring is different there. But I mean I'll speak for for my company from starting ground up, and I think this might it really work well with the with the entrepreneurs that are out there, with the small and midsize companies and basically when you're small and when you're starting. And how I did this was I wanted to make sure that they understood the vision that I had for the company and what we were actually trying to do and what I wanted to do to change the industry that I was in. I'm in staffing, so I mean it's a pretty robust industry. Majority of us, you know, we're doing the same thing. I mean you know what we're doing is we're connecting talent with with companies. We're not creating a different product. We're not, you know, creating software anything like that. So I wanted to deliver services that we're very, very different. When, before I started identified talent, I was internal, so meaning that I was the one recruiting internally for customers. So I kind of saw it in a different point of view and I had these staffing companies come to me and there was things that I didn't like and there are things that I did like, and I wanted to take the best of the best and I wanted to also make sure that I understood what the needs of an internal recruitment department is so we can augment it in that fashion. So for me, when I started this, I wanted to one again just kind of reiterate. I wanted to make sure that I was, for me, absolutely clear on the vision and the path that I wanted to go down right as far as my company and the services and what we stand for and what we can deliver.

Now, when I was clear with that, I needed to find someone that was in line. When you're very small and you don't have that much resources and you're going to demand a lot of work from whoever you bring on, they need to be absolutely onezero percent bought in into the vision that you want to create and then the company that you want to create as well. So that's what I was looking for. It took me a long time to find the right group of people because they had to be bought in. It wasn't about like how much money that I can throw on your way, or vacation time or Pteo or sick time or ping pong tables or anything like that. They really needed to be bought into what I was doing and also I needed to be bought into what they wanted to create in their life. Right I think employment seems to be very one sided nowadays. It's like, you know, I'm looking for this skill set, you need to have five years of this, you need to have a college degree in this, and we're asking the candidate to say, tell me what you can do for me. It reminds me of that JFK quote. Ask not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country. So I took that secondary as an approach to understand that, okay, if I'm going to get the best person that's going to align with my company, what can my company actually give to them? You know, and in order for me to know that, I needed to know what they wanted. You know, what are your what are your goals outside of the company? I mean, do you want to buy rental property? I mean, I can, we can do it. It's whatever they want. You know, I'm looking for the long term. But do you want to retire when you're fifty five? You want to retire when you're seventy five? You want to have like three, three week, three months vacation every year? And if so, how does my company and how do we need to maneuver to be able to provide that for you if we can? So I wanted to make sure that it was it was a two way street. I think it's like I think employing people are very much similar like being in a relationship. You know, I think people's tried, tend to say it's fifty, it's I mean, I'm married. It's never fifty, it's one hundred, hundred of all the time. You know, sometimes there's going to be months where I'm like, I don't want to do this, and she has to go one hundred and I have to go one hundred and we're both going one hundred, and that's the thing...

...right I think. I think when you have a relationship, and it's no different because we're talking about people at the end of the day. So if it's a personal relationship, it's a marriage, it's a you know, it's a significant other. You know, you to make things work. One, you have to be really clear on what you're trying to make work and secondary, you have to be you have to be one hundred percent invested into making it work. And when I say but making it work is not what's feels good for me or not what I feel is right, but what actually makes it work. So that's the kind of betting process that I look for. You know, obviously there's a skill set that I'm looking for and there's like attributes or or skills that they have carried as far as the hard skills and the tangible skills. But at the end of the day, it's really, really important, when you're small, to find that that person that that doesn't walk behind you, but that walks beside you and, when you fall down, runs in front of you too. And you need to be able to convey the vision of what you're trying to create and how your company is going to support them in their vision and their personal goals as well. All Right, today's growth story revolves around search engine marketing and we'll be shining the spotlight on ags software, a company that makes software for manufacturing operations. Ages was one of the first companies in their space to invest in search marketing, but as competition grew, their performance plateaued. To counter this, they hired directive consultant, the B Tob Search Marketing Agency, with unparalleled experience in in bent legend. For BDB companies, directive was able to increase a just as monthly online leads by four hundred and fifty seven percent, while at the same time lowering their cost per lead by a hundred and forty seven percent. I have a hunch that directive can get these kind of results free to so head over to directive consultingcom and request a totally free custom proposal. That's directive consultingcom. All right, let's get back to this interview. One of the things that struck me when we were talking, before we start a recording, was that...

...you know each of your employees personal goals, and so it's obviously it's obviously a very important priority for you and as part of developing a high performing team. But so not only do you have them bought in on your vision, not only do are you aware of their personal goals, but you actually use that information to tie it back to the company. Oh, absolutely, absolutely. I mean, you know, we have weekly meetings and, you know what, for the most part, where what? We're all virtual, you know, so they can kind of work where, wherever they want. They can come on the office, they can work from home or whatever they want. Right. So, however, every time we get together on a weekly basis, we talk about their goals too. I mean, you know, it's like a it's like a family sitting down around the you know, the dinner table. Right. So the reason why I do that one is just because I care. I mean we're, you know, we're in a recruitment we're in a people industry. Our services and our products are people, you know, there we there's no way of getting around that. If you don't like people, you shouldn't be doing this, you know. So the first thing that I want to know is, like, what are your goals like from like, you know, a single mother that wants to pay for her child's like, you know, the whole college tuitions without having them take a loan to, you know, a mother that has not been in the workforce for the last twelve years because she was raising her kids, getting back into an opportunity and being a contributor to their family. Those things are important to me and the reason why they're important to me because people are important to me period. You know, I got into I became an entrepreneur because I wanted to change things in people's lives, not necessary the industry, but in people's lives. And, with that being said, I think there's a I throw a lot out, a lot of quotes, Jonathan, but there's one of her that that always resonates with me is people don't care how much you know unless they know how much you care. The minute you know, and I guarantee you, I can pay for a lot of people's hands, but I can't pay for their hearts. And the minute you know, the minute that someone knows that you absolutely care about them, they open up the world. I mean, that's just how it is. You know. So, so that's why I think it's important to understand that that, you know, if...

I have somebody in my company, I am the Custodian to making sure they achieve not only the company goals, right, because that's what makes us, you know, that's our livelihood. But at the same time, how am I contributing to your personal goals? And is the company tying into that? Yeah, well, and you know, it definitely sounds like all of that combined has a strong influence on your company culture and kind of what that means. Yeah, it does. I mean we are, we are a people first culture and you know, when I established this I didn't have any you know, rhyme reason on what I wanted to create. You know, I think, I think we talked in the past. I didn't create a company because I wanted to create something colossal. I did it because I had to. You know, unfortunately my wife passed away of cancer and it was something that they needed to do. But it kind of metamorphosized into something incredible. So eventually what I did was I called it my sandbox, right, because I think it's like me and you, Jonathan, if we were five years old and we'd play in a sandbox, right, and we have like some cars and stuff like that, we can sit there for like literally like ours, and just create like a utopia and a city and in a subway system or whatever, we wanted to create through our own imaginations and I felt that when I was in, you know, I guess, I would say, lack of a better word, as traditional workforce, I didn't have that opportunity and that's what I see now. It is is that when I do talk to people that are looking for new employment or new opportunities, they're lacking in the creativity of like what they can do in the workplace, what they can affect. Right, because nowadays what we're told is like you do this, you take this hammer, hit the nail, just keep hitting the nail all day and don't question anything. Right, we're viewed as resources, but as human beings, we want to create. I mean that's why you have your podcast. You want to create things and you want to share things and you want to do things. So I called my company my sandbox. So they're able to create things and do things and collaborate without like any backlash. So, you know, the creativity really helps that, you know, award that...

...high performing culture, and I would really implore, like other employers, to be able to let the let your employees do that, let your employees create, let your employees make mistakes. You know, it's like when you're little kid and you make a mistake and you're like hey, you made a mistake, it's okay. Yeah, well, you know, Paul, obviously you know you've built a successful company. You're passionate about about your employees. Creativity, as you just said, is a priority for you. So I think this is all probably going to be wrapped up and by at least partially in this next question. But we have been asking a lot of our guests what kind of legacy are you hoping to leave behind at the end of the day? That's a really good question, I think. I think the legacy that I want to leave behind is that I want to make sure that everyone that I do touch, you know, one I have helped achieve their goals, right, because I think, you know, here's my quote again, it's like people forget. You know what, sometimes people forget what you do for them, but they'll always remember how you touch them, and I want to make sure that you know that. I guess one I leave this earth, you know what people will say to me is that I was absolutely committed to their better men, you know, and what they can achieve as a person. Right because, at the end of the day, I want to make sure that, you know, I think it helps from from a whole standpoint, and I do it in the realm of employment and career is because that I want to make sure that they're happy and their employment and their career, because that's what really fuels our livelihood. You know, at the end of the day, right, like I think if we can get people, or if at least I can get people, at least the you know, my team, to really really be enthusiastic about their life, then what happens is that carries on to their kids and that carries on to their family and that carries on to their friends, and it's like a pebble in a stream, that it's you know, it affects a lot of people. It might sound very like Utopian, but I mean at the end of the day, you know, it's like, I don't care, it's what I want to leave...

...behind. So hopefully that answers the question on, like, you know, what kind of legacy I want to leave behind. Now it does. It does, and what's wrong? What's wrong with being Utopian about there's other wrong with it. That that's what do. You said that because, like you know, sometimes, like I let people visit my meetings and sometimes I get freaked out by the excitement. That's they're right, you know, like Oh, why are you guys so happy? I'm like, why are you not? It's like this weird norm to like come up to somebody and say, Hey, how you doing? I'm fine. What's new with you? Same Old, same old. Why is that okay? Why? Why are you okay? Our people okay with that. So they you know that. That's where I think we kind of need to shift. So, you know, tastic. Well, absolutely, we wish you. We wish you success with your legacy. We wish you continued success with identified town solutions. And speaking of which, Paul, if anyone in our audiences they're interested in, you know, learning more about today's episode, they're interested in connecting with you, they're interested in connecting with identified town solutions. What's the best way for them to go about doing that? Yeah, absolutely. We're on Linkedin, facebook, twitter, every social media at identified talent solutions. You can connect with me. I have a personal website Paul Michael Davidcom. I'm also Paul Michael Daven on instagram. I'm on Linkedin if anyone wants to connect with me. It's pretty easy, just the type of type identified talent solutions are Paul, Michael David. And you don't find me, you to connect with me through any any of the Solcian about any of the media channels. Perfect. Well. Again, thank you so much for your time today, Paul. It was real there's a pleasure having you on the show. Yeah, absolutely, thanks for having there are lots of ways to build a community and we've chosen to build the BEDD growth community through this podcast. But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage with our listeners and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across the country with our listeners and guests. No sales...

...pitches, no agenda, just great conversations with likeminded people. Will Talk Business, will talk family, will talk goals and dreams, will build friendships. So if you'd like to be a part of a BEDB growth dinner in a sitting near you, go to be tob growth dinnerscom. That's be toob growth dinnerscom. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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