690: How to Get Started with Agile Marketing w/ Kate Moore

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Kate Moore, VP Marketing at LeanKit.

Click here to connect with this guest on LinkedIn.

There's a ton of noise out there. So how do you get decision makers to pay attention to your brand? Start a podcast and invite your ideal clients to be guests on your show. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the B tob growth show, a podcast dedicated to helping be tob executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BB growth show. This episode is sponsored by Directive Consulting, the B Tob Search Marketing Agency. We are here today with Kate Moore. She is the VP of marketing at Lean Kit Kay. How you doing today? I'm doing well. How are you? I am fantastic. So, Kate, we're going to be talking about getting started with agile marketing today, but before we do that I want to explain to to listeners really why you're the person to be talking about this. Could you explain to us what link it is and what you're in your team up to up there? Sure good question. So at lean kid we are a visual con bond board. It's hosted digitally and it allows your teams to visualize your work and connect work in a way that makes sense for your business. For for me personally, you know, we sort of try to eat our own dog food, if you will, on practicing conbon and lean and so, while we bothly serve larger price customers, are marketing team of about twenty practices Agile Marketing in the text base and we've seen some great results. So that's it's really more sharing about what we're doing internally than anything. Yeah, yeah, absolutely so. So. So you guys have, have you know about a twenty person? Twenty Person Marketing Team? Could you...

...share come, before we get into kind of these the we're going to talk about three specific things that folks can do to get started with agile marketing, but can you talk about kind of some of the since you guys practice it yourself, can you speak firsthand like the benefits of doing this is opposed to other approaches that other marketing teams tend to take? Yeah, absolutely so. I think the the biggest benefits are really getting work done faster, optimizing your team to be sure that you're working on the right work right. So there's a prioritization component to it. I think there's also a strong cultural component. Our team is is closer and we have revis ability to manage conflict better, I would say, than most traditional marketing teams that you know, may have hidden work or Stilo would work right. I was once on a large, larger scale demand generation team and we didn't really know what was happening over in marketing off and and so we, mean could get our best to break down those silos, even though, you know, twenty, twenty people's a lot of people each each sub team knows what's going on, because to get really any work out the door from a marketing perspective these days, it it. It takes the village. So you know, it takes who takes people from all different departments getting together to complete the work, and so understanding what those other teams are up to is an important part of being able to get the work done faster. All right, so the first the first piece we're going to talk about, Kate, is really, as we're talking about it, offline and more around kind of the mindset and as folks go to start to approach an agile approach to their marketing. It's it's idea of of getting feedback faster, and the quicker that you can get work out the door, the...

...more you can get feedback on it and then iterate according to what customers and potential customers want, and so you can do more of what's what's working, as opposed to spending a lot of time on something that ultimately isn't hitting the mark. So can you really impact that for us this so that the folks are in the in the right mindset as they go to approach agile marketing? Yeah, absolutely, and it is a good question. I think it's particularly hard for markers to approach and add a way of marketing because we all want to make a good first impression, right. So the idea that you only have one chance to make a first impression is true. I think we can spin ourselves a little bit in in circles trying to make a campaign or a blog post or what have you perfect before we get it out the door. And in reality it's our idea of perfect right, it's not necessarily our customer or our prospects idea of perfect. And while we know a ton about our customers in our prospects and we know what kind of value we can provide to them. We there are things we don't know right. Things change over time. You know, people like to be interacted with differently, you know, what have you, and so the ability to move faster and get feedback faster really enables the concept of putting out stuff that is, you know, about, totally about your customer and not necessarily about our own connotations of what we think our customers need. So that's that's really what that is. It's a hard thing, right, it's a it's also a really humbling thing. I think I know a lot about my customers, right, but oftentimes, you know, when we put something out there, we specifically have a hypothesis about what we think will learn from it, and I'm wrong a lot and it shows. It shows right, it shows that you need to to do what...

...you can to start small, get something out there and see how it resonates to know whether or not you kind of got it right. Yeah, so, so kick does that mean the in the cont obviously the context of marketing? A lot of markers listening to this. Does that mean getting a blog post out about a certain topic because you know that it's you know, your team has a seven day turn time. Typically take seven days to get a blog posts out, as opposed to saying, Hey, we're going to put out an ebook or we're going to produce a webinar series, because you know that those initiatives tend to take, you know, a month or forty five days, and so getting the blog post out first means you can get it turned around and seven and then, based on the feedback you get from that piece of content, then determining whether you're going to turn it into a larger asset. Is that? Is that kind of the how it shakes out from a like really practically, or am I thinking about that wrong? Now, that's a good example. I would even I would even go further than that. Right, like what is the concept you want to write about? You want that piece of content to be, and what is what do you think you're going to learn from feedback from that piece of content? And then you know, because in some instances, right, you can. You should put out an Ebook, right, or you should put out a info graphic that is really well designed, right and takes longer, but you don't. You don't know that until you know whether or not the topic even resonates right, so you can even think smaller about it. Maybe it's a Linkedin Post, you know, or, if you know, a twitter post or something like that. All right, I want to tell you a little story about clear company. This HR Tech Company was doing a lot of things right. Their messaging was clear, their product produced incredible results, but they were struggling to drive qualified traffic to their website. Then they found directive consulting, a B Tob Search Marketing Agency. Within the first twelve months of working with directive, clear company was able to increase their qualified lead volume by a hundred and fifty...

...seven percent. Now I have a hunch that directive can get these kind of results for you to so head over to directive consultingcom and request a totally free custom proposal. That's directive consultingcom. All right, let's get back to this interview. I've also heard of people running, like running like miccro Google ad words campaigns to see, like how much something is clicked on, and it just it runs to a landing page that says, Hey, we're you know, we're working on this right now. You know, sign up here and we'll you'll be one of the first ones to you know, to get it. I've heard of people doing that when it comes to like kind of coming up with product ideas, but I think it could absolutely translate into into content as well and could give you an idea of and of what the search volume is for for that kind of topic as well. I was going to say that's the great point. I've heard of people it's expensive, but I think you get feedback faster, right, if there's a specific term that is like, for instance, for us, con bond is a huge search term that we you know, we know works, right, but let's say we didn't know it work. We could buy out, for call it, a month, you know, all of the search volume around that term. It's incredibly expensive, right, but you learned quickly whether or not your message resonated against another message. Now there's all kinds of other fact seasonality is l Lah, right, but you put something out there quickly, you got a large audience and and so you learn faster with the understanding of knowing that kind of the end result of this is we're trying to shoot for getting feedback faster. The next piece we're going to talk about, Kate, is its idea of visualizing your work and, and this is something you know, I feel like, is so easy to miss because it's like, okay, well, Sally, Sally does this and Bob does this, but it's not visualized anywhere. Obviously this is something you get, like you guys do, your tool does this.

But talk about the importance at a high level, of like why visualizing your work is so important. If you're if you're trying to go about it in an agile way, it's that's such a good question. It is the first and foremost, the the single step to get right. Before you you practice, you know and you create an Adil Marquade team, right. So, creating a board, no matter what it is, if it's a white board, a Chalkboard, a digital board, what what have you get in the in the habit of having everyone on your team post sticky notes to that board with whatever work item, big or small, they're working on, because you see how prioritization decisions are happening in their own minds. Right, like, if you're not, if your teams aren't visualizing work, you know, as managers, how do you have how do you how do you know really what they're working on, and how do they know what each other is working on right. That's the most important piece. If you're trying to get a campaign out the door, you know, the designer might not know that that need for a new banner is is coming down the pike right, but if he knows that you're working on a new campaign, you can probably gather. Well, every campaign we do has a banner. So you know, I know that that's coming, that work is coming. There's so many benefits to visualizing your work, but I would say the the biggest one is you realize just how much work you're trying to do. Right, we all have limited resources, with limited people. How do you know what is the best work to work on when the mouthful? But you know, if you can see how much work you're trying to get done, you can better prioritize, and that's really the value. You can prioritize work. Then you know, you know the work behind your big gets, hypothicies or where you need the most feedback. You can prioritize that work over other work. Okay, so so we've talked about getting feedback faster. We've talked about the the absolute necessity of visualizing your work, having some sort of system, whether it's link kit or,...

...you know, another tool to do that. But make sure that you're visualizing your work. And then this third piece we're going to talk about, Kate, is limiting your work in progress. Talk to us about the importance of this one. Yeah, so you know you, let's say to you, take you know, you've got call it for people on a marketing team. Right in those four people put a sticky note for every work items that they have, you know, on their plate, whether they've started it or they're you know, it's planned work, like they're getting ready to do it or, oh my gosh, you know, Marquettos down and we need to, you know, do something to get it back up right, sort of unplanned work. Every time there's a new piece of work that comes up, visualize it on a sticky note. You realize how much work you're doing. You can then limit your work in progress. So it sounds counterintuitive, right, so if I limit the work that I'm that I'm trying to do, I get more done faster, but it's actually the case you when you focus on one item right, if you start that item and you bring it to completion, you'll finish it faster than trying to do two or three things in that same time the right because if you're trying to do two or three things at once, your context switching between those items and you know you can't. You can't limit all of it, right. But if you're aware of it and you're aware that when you put something down when it's not completed, to take something else up, it's going to take you longer to complete both items, you know it gives you just the sense of I do want to work faster, right, I do want to work on the right things. Are the most important things, then it it helps you to, you know, be happier in your job. That sounds like a, you know, crazy thing, right, that something like a could make you happier, but it does. It also, you know, if you're working on a team board right and you limit your team's work in progress, the team is happier.

The team is able to huddle around, you know, one big campaign, let's say, right, and they're able to have conversations about what's the most important aspects of that campaign are. They're able to prioritize within that campaign. You know, they're able to put down all the other noise of all the other to do things that they have on their lists or hidden work that no one knows about. Right. They're able to take that mental capacity and apply it to the stuff they really love doing, like a campaign or a particular aspect of a campaign. I love it. Okay, you've given us some some really practical things to look at as we're start to embark on really implementing an jol marketing methodology. If there's somebody listening to this, they want to stay connected with you, they want to learn more about lane kit. What's the best way for them to go about doing that? Sure, I'm on linkin under Kate O'Neil more. That's probably the best way to get at me, or you can always email me at more kate with a k, the number six at gmailcom. Awesome to able. Thank you so much for your time today. This has been fantastic and I really appreciate it. Thank you very much. I appreciate the opportunity. There are lots of ways to build a community and we've chosen to build the be tob growth community through this podcast. But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage with our listeners and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across the country with our listeners and guests. No sales pitches, no agenda, just great conversations with likeminded people. Will Talk Business, will talk family, will talk goals and dreams, will build friendships. So if you'd like to be a part of a be tob growth dinner in a sitting near you, go to be to be growth dinnerscom. That's be to be growth dinnerscom. Thank you so much...

...for listening. Until next time.

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