643: Avoid These Mistakes When Creating Your Strategic Plan w/ Jasmine Martirossian

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Dr. Jasmine Martirossian, VP of Marketing at The Training Associates.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/jasminemartirossian/

Looking for a guaranteed way to create content that resonates with your audience? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients and let them choose the topic of the interview, because if your ideal clients care about the topic, there's a good chance the rest of your audience will care about it too. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the B tob growth show, podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources? You've come to the right place. I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carberry. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BB growth show. We are here today with Dr Jasmine Marty Rosen. How are you doing today, Jasmin? Great, James, thanks for having me on your show. I'm excited to chat with you. So, Judsmine, you are the VP of marketing at the training associates and today we...

...are going to be talking about strategic planning and marketing priorities, especially in the context of the modern and very digital world that we live in today. But before we dive into that, I'd love for you to just give a little bit of context tell us what you and your team er up to at the training associates. Thanks, James. Appreciate the time. The training associates helps clients and partners improve both their performance and profitability by providing top notch LD talent and we provide all sorts of customized training. We work with human capital. We have about twenty fivezero outside trainers and led experts that we can call on to do customized projects for our clients. And we don't do like out of the box solutions. We look at the organization's needs and craft a strategic approach that will really help transform the organizations. So we help drive cultural change,...

...we help with mergers when you need to train make major contingents of workforce. So it's a huge undertaking and we really appreciate the people will work with and we try to bring the human component in and we're huge on making sure that our own culture is the type that people thrive at. So, jazz and I want to I want to dive into strategic planning and marketing priorities. You've done a lot of work around strategic planning specifically. Can you talk to us as you've studied this and you've implemented this as many times as you have. How do you define a strategic plan, first off, and then I'd love for you to dive into some of the mistakes that you see a lot of organizations making when it comes to strategic planning. Sure, James. So I look at strategic planning again based on my experience of working but a variety of organization with lots of boards of directors, serving on boards of directors and looking...

...at corporate growth to scale up an organization. And guess what? Most organizations do not have a strategic plan. Or would they have? Is Not an effective strategic plan. A lot of strategic planning exercises are always concluded with a stream of consciousness document, which is not really the plan. You need something that focuses people's ideas. It's it needs to be developed through the process where those who are part of the plan have buying into the plan and they understand why they're doing something, and the why very often is missing. And the plan has to have very specific strategic imperatives and objectives. You know, outline for the next six to twelve months to know, okay, these are the key strategies of our organization. You know, things change really fast these days. I think the digital error is a huge component in this very often,...

...you know. But to transform an organization is not the same as pressing send on an email button. It's about really stepping back and seeing what the vision is, where we want to be, what changes do we need to make? And change is always painful. But if you have buying from the organization is everybody's marching to the same drummer and everybody believes in that strategic plan and knows what the priorities are, it's an entirely different conversation because then you can implement those and a plan is not a plan if it does not have responsible bodies identified, responsible departments, if it's not aligned across different parts of the organization and if it's not, you know, identifying success factors what the success look like in this area. Also, a plan has to have the opportunity for key implementers to come back and present if there is new data that they have found, there are new factors to be considered. It has to be...

...a living plan, but it's really important to say do three to five things really well, then fifteen things in a very medial core or substandard way. Yeah, by focusing on those three to five things as opposed to just putting down, you know, fifteen things where you know, hey, we want to it's very lofty ambition to say we want to change these fifteen things in the organization and or start focusing on these fifteen things. So you're saying narrow it down two, three to five strategic objectives and then those those things have to be measurable, they have to be time bound, they have to have specific people within the organization that are owning those objectives. Is that right, absolute lie? And if there has to be a transparent process to what everybody has to understand, we are rowing towards the goal. Think of it as a symphony orchestra. When you come before a concert you know when the orchestray is tuning, the instruments are not aligned. When the instruments are online and...

...there is a conductor leading it, it's a different sound. It all comes together. It's all meaningful. So good strategic plan with the right leadership and implementation sounds like an orchestra and it will tuned. One love it. And so now kind of shifting over to marketing priorities in context of a strategic plan. How does marketing prioritize based on the strategic plan, given that they have a strategic plan to work off of? Well, so everything that marketing does should work to support the strategic objectives of the organization, depending on which area it is, whether it's getting greater brand recognition, whether it's built, you know, increasing market share, bringing more leads in, whether it's in positioning the organization from a new angle, if the organization is shifting, is focused, whatever is the organizational strategy, marketing has to work to support that.

And again we're dealing with the same environment where we get a lot of digital little noise. There is a ton of activity these days and again marketers are afraid to prioritize because it takes courage to be both strategic and to really prioritize. Again, we are in a very digital, fast moving world. All of these are really great, but again we need to row in a direction rather than haphazardly in the middle of an ocean. And when you say you know marketers are fearful of prioritizing, is that typically result of just not knowing what to prioritize, because of a lack of strategic plan? Is it because they don't want to be seen as someone that can't do it all and they can't handle it all. What do you think attributes to that fear of prioritizing what's interesting? Most people, again this is a very natural human reaction,...

...are afraid to come across as be seen as they're the people who cannot do it all. But at the end of the day, there are only so many hours in a day and either we make a focused effort to direct our energies as a George Lucas, the creator of Star Wars, says, your focus is what defines you, and most marketers, unfortunately again, do not have that focus. And this is a market issue. This is not any organization position. Those are trends. Part of it. You know, we're on fifteen different social platforms. I'd rather will rock it out on a couple of social platforms and do really well and be providing both original content and properly created content and have the right audience and speak to the audience on those few platforms and and be really mediocre on all and that takes courage to say, you know what, this is our focus, we're going to rock it out...

...here. That takes courage. Yeah, yeah, you mentioned something offline, Jasmine, that I thought was really interesting. You said that we've got a rise above the noise, we've got a rise above transactional content. Can you elaborate on what you mean by that? So a lot of marketers, if you look out there in the industry, across different industries, a lot of the content is very old fashioned chest thumping. Come see this, we're doing this, it's all about us and it's highly transactional, but it does not talk about what that means to the audience. What is the value proposition? What is the benefit to the audience? How do you, you know, really connect with people and engage them? That's what change, you know, I think, these days, separates really successful marketers from those who are adding to that digital noise. I mean we're now, every couple of days creating...

...more information, though not more knowledge, than existed until two thousand so it's mind boggling. But how do we rise up above that noise and differentiate ourselves? Are Organizations, and is that by having more conversations with the customer, with with prospects, identifying where where their gaps are, where they're struggling, and then backfilling that once once you have that insight, than backfilling that by creating content that aligns with both their need and and your organization strategic objective. Is are that more focused on just the need of the customer? I think you have to hear the voice of the customer. It's really important to really hear what the customers are looking for. Like I come from market research background as well, you know, and really hearing the customer and up. Those are the listening skills right. That makes the world of difference. Knot,...

...nobody can afford these days to just really sit in a conference room and figure out all this is what customers want. You have to especially when if you were in a service industry. I think it's a little different in products because customers, you know, apple famously did not do any market research to launch the iphone, and we all know it's runaway success it. But that was different because it's true innovation where people did not even know they miss something. Yeah, they didn't know, they did know. That's a different proposition, complex situation. But when you're in a service business and you're resolving pain points for customers, they're talking about it. Most organizations, though, do not hear their customers. They not hear the voice it more because, though, we do this. But if you look at organizations that have been successful over the years, those are the ones that have recalibrated themselves and grown. I mean going back to the apple example. They were they started out as a...

...desktop computer company and that's now a small fraction of their sales. It's because they've been really attuned to the market place to recalibrate themselves. Most organizations, though, Miss that boat. I mean famous example is New England ice manufacturers. None of them was agilely enough to move themselves to refrigeration. Yeah, that makes perfect sense. Jasmine, this has been fantastic. I really appreciate you sharing your insight with with our listeners. If there's somebody listening to this they want to stay connected with you or they want to learn more about the training associates, what's the best way for them to go about doing that? Thanks for asking and thank you, James. Training Associates, who are our website is www the training associatescom or just the training Associs Thatcom we and I'm also on Linkedin and we have a training associates group on linkedin where we're providing both original and cuated content. We have a group for LND and training professionals.

So we're really looking forward to hearing from the public and whatever we can do to respond with ansade. Again, Jasine, thank you so much for your time today. This has been fantastic. Can really appreciate it. Thank you so much. There are lots of ways to build a community and we've chosen to build the bed growth community through this podcast. But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage with our listeners and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across the country with our listeners and guests. No sales pitches, no agenda, just great conversations with like minded people. Will Talk Business, will talk family, will talk goals and dreams, will build friendships. So if you'd like to be a part of a BEDB growth dinner...

...in a sitting near you, go to be to be growth dinnerscom. That's be to be growth dinnerscom. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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