641: 3 Reasons Blueprint Technologies is the Fastest Growing Company in Washington (2 Years in a Row) w/ Ryan Neal

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Ryan Neal, CEO at Blueprint Technologies.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/ryantneal/

Wouldn't it be nice to have severalfault leaders in your industry know and Love Your brand? Start a podcast,invite your industries thought leaders to be guests on your show and start reaping thebenefits of having a network full of industry influencers. Learn more at sweet fishMediacom. You're listening to the be to be growth show, podcast dedicated tohelping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategiesor tools and resources? You've come to the right place. I'm JonathanGreen and I'm James Carberry. Let's get it into the show. Welcome backto the baby growth show. We are here today with Ryan Neil. Heis the president at blueprint technologies. Ryan, how you doing today? Great,how are you? I am wonderful. So, Ryan, I'm excited tochat with you today. You were the number one fastest growing consulting companyin the US this past year. You...

...on the ink five hundreds. HowI's how you guys popped up on my radar. But then for the pasttwo years in a row now you've been the fastest growing company in Washington State. You guys are clearly doing something right and I'm excited to talk about threespecific things that you think that you really attribute your growth to. But beforewe dive into those three things, I'd love for you to plan our listeners. What is blueprint technology is? What are you guys all about up there? Well, yeah, we used to. Thanks for having me out of bythe way. It's awesome. It's the privilege. We used to beblueprint consulting services and now gone through a rebrand because we have been able totransform ourselves into a full technology company. But we we specialize in in digitizationsolutions and products. That our target at companies high value business outcomes. Sowhat that means, kind of in plane speak, is is we take alook at any kind of any kind of company out there and assess there wherethey where they want to go to three...

...years from now and and partner withthem to be able to digitize all different aspects of their business, from thecustomer experience all the way down to their cloud infrastructure. So, Ryan,I want to dive into as we're talking about. Fine, you mentioned threespecific things and I asked you know how you guys grown so fast. Thefirst thing you said was that you're staying two to three years ahead of thecustomer. Can you talk to us a little bit more about that? Yeah, definitely. We know. We call that kind of a visualization, visualizationpiece of our business and you know, it an asfests itself in different areasof the company. In our in our experimentation division, they they talk aboutfailing, failing fast before so our customers don't have to and then in ourclient development, our sale as organization, they talk about being out in frontof being innovative for our customers, who we can bring the innovation to them. And what it really means is to...

...us is it's all about being customer, the customer obsessed and being able to deliver and and know our customers issuch a deep well of not just as the organization or within their industry vertical, but also as individuals and kind of their history, how they got towhere they're at right now and being able to give them context around where technologyis, where their technology is and where it needs to go. And theonly way that we feel like that's the way that we feel that it's mosteffective, is projecting out two to three years, three to five years.But we're technology is moving and and going deeply the players that are driving thattechnology change, the Microsoft and Amas, the googles of the world, andbeing able to be able to work with that technology in a way that isrelevant we can bring to our customers. Could you give us an example,Ryan, of maybe it's a recent conversation you, you have the prospect ora customer. Where do you see technology and into to three years? Well, we we see. You know,...

...we're we're headquartered out of the NorthWest, so we have you know, it's good and bad. It's ait's a the good side with the center of the innovation that's going on incloud technology in the the Seattle area, but it what it does on theon the bad side is it gives us a little bit of a blind spot. It gives us blinders to where the rest of the world's preceding technology,and so we constantly try to pull ourselves out of this little bubble door inbut knowing what we know about where where technology is moving in this area,it's really clear that that everything is moving towards automation and be and eliminating theneed for human beings to do useless, meaningless tasks that so many people arethat do on a daily, day to day basis, you know, andjust a great example that we were in the we kicked off a a insolution engagement last week with a with an oil and gas company, and theyhave an entire team of thirty data analysts...

...that that do manual transfer data andprint up these packets of legal paper and analyze, analyze data. That's theirentire jobs, and those like being able to automate that, letting them focuson something that actually drives value in the organization versus a meaningless, task orientedjob that doesn't give them any kind of life satisfaction is really what we're allnot where we see automation and technology moving at. The second thing that thatyou and I talked about offline was that you guys are constantly cannibalizing what you'redoing. For the person listening that doesn't have context around that, I'm forthat sounds super weird. So explain on what you mean when you're talking aboutconstantly cannibalizing yourself. Yes, and we we take an approach of always youcan, you can frame it and more in less less per Jorda, tospeak. It's a you can think of it more of we always have towe always either have to justify our existence. We constantly have to justify our existenceto our customers, and then the...

...other side is we always challenge ourexistence. Why if we're actually needed, and you know, it's important tous as entrepreur we have we're of a very entrepreneurial culture and we are weare business first, kind of text second, and and really people centric. Andso we always make sure that we're driving value into our customers and wehave a firm belief that if we're not driving any value into our customers,they should they shouldn't pay us, they shouldn't have us around. And sowhat that means is, you know, the cannibalizing, is we try toget rid of ourselves, our own existence, challenge whether or not we are relevant, and that's what's actually driven the majority of the change that's happened.Well, year over year, we've think over the last five years we've donethe seven or reork and we just did a rebrand into a full technology company. There's not many consulting companies out there that end up making products and becomea full, full technology company. So if it's, you know, thewe're talking off line, the next product that we have coming out in thesummer we actually call the automated consultant.

The whole goal is is to seeif we can get enough penetration in the market to put consulting companies actually outof business. Well, so literally, like the the word cannibalizing yourself thereis becomes very real when you're building a product to literally decimate what you're bidwasn't it wasn't the most friendly thing for me to talk about it at theConsulting magazine panel. We were there, but I said, like, youknow, if you guys are doing the Trident, if you guys are stillparticipating in the traditional consulting model that was relevant twenty years ago, you guyswill be out of business and five because it's just it's a product of asmall window where technology was a little bit prevalent but it was still pretty immature. And you know the the cloud is eventually be going to become a utilityand there's no need for so many of these companies that exist that that costcompanies tons of money to do task that should be automated. Wow, Ilove that. That mindset, though,...

...of constantly challenging like why do weexist? Are we adding legitimate value, driving value in our customers. Andif we're not, let's and even even if we are currently, but wedon't see ourselves doing that two to three years out. What are we doingtoday to be able to drive that value? And clearly, I you know,with the with the rebrand, repositioning yourselves as a technology company instead ofa consulting company, I can I can see that it's there's action being thanfrom that line of thinking. Yeah, it's ercent. Yeah, that lastpart is super important. It's the it's the what are you going to doabout it? And, without judgment, so many people, from an identityand ego standpoint, they hang on to their path, successes and and that'swhat causes status quo in the world. And and so, yeah, that'skind of a Philosoft the beliefs that we have. That runs cord to everythingthat we do. I just couldn't imagine if Ampazon was still just selling books. And that exactly I was thinking. I think is so vital if youwant to survive in a landscape that seems...

...like it's changing every single minute.We we send that meme around once. It probably once a quarter, thatthat has the Jeff bezos of one thousand nine hundred and ninety seven of Isell books, and then the new version of him, he's, you know, before he's a guy letter, yeah, bail, power, pattern, baldness, and now he's like, I sell whatever I want, and he'shim the aviator, shades and sowing to end of his mind and court sideda basketball game. Yeah, exactly. All right. So this last piece, we're going to talk about Ryan is in really the third, the thirdkey to you guys experiencing the growth that you've experienced is that you operationalize rapidly. Talk to us about this. If, above all else, you know,we think that we have a kind of firm business belief that that operationsis key and what it's what we think separates us from most other companies thatwe think, you know, sales people are diamond dozen, their valuable,diaval in people, but they're they're definitely...

...a you can you can always findgoods and sales people. You can always find good people with really good ideas, you can always find good product people. It's really tough to find people whoare really good operators, and that this operators in a static state,you know, managing operations in a in a world that grows at five percentyear over year is a relatively static environment. You kind of you kind of youkind of managing the existing chess pieces. But to may be able to managea company that grows twenty, five hundred percent over five years, youknow you have to. You have to be able to standardize and operationalizes RAPPreally rapidly to make sure there's no churn. You know, I think the statfrom Warren bus sets as a seventy percent of companies that go out ofbusiness they go out of business while they're growing and and and so being ableto actually manage appropriate cash flow, being able to project out and swings ininstance you're going to have to make to acquire new customers, being able tobuild out facilities and be able to finance...

...that, structure your contracts with it, being able to actually just run, set up and standardize your business processesand your metrics just fiercely like it is super crucial and I think it's justyou know, we actually, we actually do high growth consulting for for companies, and that's the biggest piece of advice that they give them is, youknow, especially CEOS or either enamored with their customer or their enamored with theirproduct, and usually say he should be an an enamored with your accountants.Okay, so I want to I want to dive a little bit deeper intothis idea of operationalizing rapidly. If you were to pinpoint, like a ifsomeone route were to really want to take this advice to heart, what isthe biggest obstacle that's that's inevitably going to be standing in their way, andhow did you guys get around that as you were really trying to embrace thisthird key, the biggest obstacle when it comes in many different forms, butit's what we try to do really well, as we try to project out allof the we try to assume the...

...good and assume that our customers aregoing to love what we do as we start to change and feel, likeyou know, when we constantly task, we itering, constantly Testa when ornot we're on the right track. But then we project out all of ourall of our cat acts and offacts, and I know this is part ofthe least exciting, the most boring part of via of wanting your podcast,but it is really about, like you know, being really good at forecastingand then also not being too granular in your plan. We do a lotof stuff on white boards and you know, the white boards are great because youcan constantly erase it as things change. And you know, I see you. We were we were advising a a company out of New York thathave to Seo that he know what is what his growth expectations were for thefollowing year because they just got done their strategic planning. He said fix persetup and they said, well, do you think that's on target, ordo you think, you know what we think, if you could do ahundred percent growth this next year, is it? Oh No, no,there's no way. That's just too fast.

We wouldn't be able to handle it. And I try to impress upon him to say that's just kind ofa limitation of you're thinking and a lack of planning and and forecasting. Thatis usually hey, it usually hampers people by their own limitation. And soyou know, what we do is we just have a hardcore set of strategicplanning. We were, we're just militant about our strategic planning, constantly assessingwhat is changed in the business, what has changed in our customers and thenwe involve people in a pretty, pretty deep level in the organization. Andwhat we do is, you know, as part of a strategic planning processes, with this constant set of initiatives which are basically our operationalizing initiatives, whichinclude everything from just the kind of nut and bolts of learning, learning management, MoD knowledge, manage that quality assure all those kind of things. Whoinvolve all of our all of our company in building and implementing those Ryan.This is this has been this incredibly helpful for me. I know our listenersare going to get a ton of value...

...out of this as well. Ifsomebody's listening to this, they want to stay connected with you, they wantto learn more about blueprint. What's the best way for them to go aboutdoing that? They go to our website, which is a bpcs a cob.It's a blueprint products consulting servicescom, but just a four letter acronym.Or they can definitely link up with me on on Linkedin, Ryan Neal.You can find me under blueprint technologies and or reach out direct I think,by, I'm pretty sure, my emails on the road. The website isriot at bpcscom. Ryan. Thank you again so much for your time today. I really appreciate it and looking forward to give us one that you gotit. Thanks for having me on. There are lots of ways to builda community and we've chosen to build the bed growth community through this podcast.But because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engage with ourlisteners, and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. So here'swhat we've decided to do. We're organizing...

...small dinners across the country with ourlisteners and guests. No sales pitches, no agenda, just great conversations withlike minded people. Will Talk Business, will talk family, will talk goalsand dreams, will build friendships. So if you'd like to be a partof a BOB growth dinner in a sitting near you, go to be tobe growth dinnerscom. That's be to be growth dinnerscom. Thank you so muchfor listening. Until next time,.

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