640: How to Tell Your Story on Multiple Social Platforms w/ Bettina Hein

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Bettina Hein, CEO at Pixability.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/bettinahein/

A relationship with the right referral partnercould be a game changer for any BEBB company. So what if you couldreverse engineer these relationships at a moment's notice, start a podcast, invite potential referralpartners to be guests on your show and grow your referral network faster thanever? Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the be tob growthshow, a podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've cometo the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's getinto the show. Welcome back to the BB growth show. We are heretoday with Bettina Hind she is the founder and CEO at pixability. Bettina,how you doing today? I'm doing great, James. Thank you for having me. I'm excited to chat with you today, Bettina. We're going tobe talking about video marketing. Today we're going to be talking about how totell your story across multiple platforms. This is something that you guys have donean exceptional job of a pixability and I'm really pumped to dive into that withyou, but before we do, I just want to give our listeners alittle bit of context as to why you're the person to be talking to aboutthis. Can you tell us a little bit about pixability and what you guysare up to up there? Sure, Um. Well, it's our missionto really power the changing video economy and what we do is we precisely connectmarketers with the right consumers and we use data to do that. So whatwe really are is the trusted video marketing and advertising technology partner for some ofthe world's leading brands and their agencies, actually hundreds of them. So weinteract a lot with people at medium size to large agencies and with brants,and this is we do that mostly on...

...the BC side. So let's saywe work with Lauren. Now, work with Avon, with Pumo, wework with rebought, we work with IBM, so there are a lot of verybig brands that we work with, even though we are now a ninetyperson company, and we do that in five locations globally. So we're headquarteredin Boston and we have locations in New York, Chicago, San Francisco andLondon. Love it I love it. So. So BETINA has a lotof your clients or BTC. You guys are obviously be to be selling tothose brands, selling to different agencies that that leverage the work that you guysdo. I want to kind of talk about, and in a BOB context, how how should be to be brands be thinking about telling their story acrossthese multiple platforms. Can you speak to kind of some of the nuances,you know, the difference of telling your story on facebook versus Youtube. Howdo you guys think about that as your marketing fixability? Yeah, sure,so, as you say, we do video marketing, right. So wehelp large brands with that and where we're specialist is on Youtube, facebook,instagram, twitter, snapchat, spotify, adding Amazon, adding Hulu, andwhat we are are marketers, marketers, right. So we have to wehave to our customers expect from us, you know, very glossy advertising,very sophisticated and what. So I've learned a lot over the last years.I've been doing this for ten years. I've learned a lot from our biggrand customers. What they really care about is their brand. Obviously they careabout what fan for and they tell stories...

...in a really compelling way. So, since we market be to be, I learn a lot from that andour team learns a lot from that. And one of the things that wehave to do is transfer the be TOC mechanisms to be to be advertising.And so we really start with showing off what we do best, which isusing data. Right. So we use our own data to create compelling contentmarketing. We analyze billions of data points about the performance of video advertising acrossall these social platforms and then we produce studies, and they are not juston our website, not just do we push them out through all the socialmedia platforms, we create videos about it, we create leave behind that are printed. We print them because we can't afford, as a small company,the lavish gifts that sometimes other vendors give their customers. But what we giftthem, essentially, is our knowledge, and so giving that away freely,where others often make you pay for that, in this industry we don't do that. We are very generous with our knowledge and we have found that evenour competitors use our our studies to then remarket them. Yeah, so youknow, we're all it. Not always always credited for that, but alot of so it's very multiprong right. We use those studies, we reallyleverage them into press conversations, briefings for...

...analysts, industry analysts, financial analysts, and we just use all of that and we have a name for aninternal name called Project Botenberg. or We essentially use we use that data andthen sort of our really powerful insights team at pis ability to spread that messagein the market and in a way that helps the people, helps a journalist, helps a brand. So from that helpfulness week we start. And thenthe questions how do we disseminate it through all these vehicles? Right, andthen once we have that, we go into sales mode. Right. Sothen we have to capture people's email addresses, we have to really reach out tothem, and in the advertising industry a lot of them is still donethrough field sales. Right. It's far large enterprise sale if you look atit from the you know, vocabulary standpoint. What we do is, you know, our customers spent millions and millions, sometimes billions of dollars in advertising.So W to of people are lobbying them for a piece of the Pie, and so the only way that we can win is by using that dataand by showing our expertise on these platforms. And so what we do is wego around, let's say there's a big industry event. Will Geo FEXit. Okay, and the attendees will see us if they go on facebook, for Stepchat, because that's what we do. And we can't spend thequarter a million dollars sponsorship at that conference, but we make sure that we're seen. So we keep keep doing that and that leads to conversations and thenin the end that leads us to have a very premium perception in the market. Got So I want to dive into that a bit more because it's superinteresting to me. So would the context...

...be you guys going to, youknow, an event like Dream Force or industry conference, and in so whenyou say you geo fence kind of around that area, does that mean likeyou've got a video asset that you are then targeting, you're doing targeted advertisingto just people that are within that Geo fence, or does that mean somethingelse? Yes, so what we do is, let's say it's a conferencecenter in San Francisco, right dream force, we just we just use that ZIPcode. Plus we know essentially who we're target getting, so the peoplethat are there and then to their normal thing, like, you know,depending on how old they are, you know, they'll go to facebook,go to Linkedin and will and they'll see, wow, fixability. What are theseguys do? And we have a video that shows them that. Andyou know, we do that event after event after event. Got It.And so when you're when you're targeting with a zip code, Bettina, I'vealways been confused by this. Is the ZIP code basically where that person iscurrently, or is it one of the home base that they established? Soon. You know, my facebook account, I probably have the town that Ilive in listed on my facebook profile somewhere, which is associated with azip code. But if I'm, you know, and I live, youknow, in a suburb of Orlando, but when I'm in San Francisco,would your ad based on the San Francisco Zip code, would be getting thecontent in front of me and San Francisco, or only people that are that arebased in San Francisco? You can do both, right, but whatwe do is around that event. Got It. So, as you're talkingto your clients just about the nuances of of these different platforms, what what'sthe difference, what should be the difference,...

...in video that gets published to youtubeversus video that gets published a facebook or instagram or snapchat what like?Can you can you go into depth a little bit on the nuances of eachof those platforms? Of course, happy to do that. We go withalmost the same message out right because we're targeting people in their work lives.Right and rand obviously do that very differently. So what we're trying to do isget them when they are at the work event and they're kind of relaxedbecause they're checking social media about they're like, Whoa, what's this? Wow,it really pertains to what I'm what I just had a conversation about,and so we're trying to get sort of more share of their attention. That'swhat what we do for the brands. We help them tailor. We don'tcreate videos, but we help them tailor the message to whatever platform there on. And that's sometimes hard for a large brand because, despite their big resources, they have are ingrained ways of doing things. So, you know,if you're you need something really visually kemp compelling. For instagram, you needsomething that's newsworthy. For twitter, you need something that is more conversational.On facebook, you need something that is like that is for me to beeducational on Youtube, for BBC has to tell it, but both of thosehave to tell really great stories. Snapchat it has to be sort of Iwould call it like, you know, the trashy magazines kind of thing,right, if you think about people magazine, US weekly, it just has tobe the postmillennials version of that, right. So you have to dothat. And people and industry check these...

...platforms because it's their job to dothat, and the younger they are, the where they check it. Sowe're influencing the younger decisionmakers on the let's say younger platforms. FACEBOOK and Linkedinare sort of a little bit more for the older demographic. So if we'relooking to influence some senior person, we go on Linkedin and Facebook, themore junior people are going to be on the other platforms. In Youtube,this is essentially for all, because but it's more of a I have sometime to watch something, right, I'm researching something. If you're just haveten minutes to kill between two conference things that you're watching, video is actuallynot effective. So we actually use all of those, even though were videomarketing company. We use all of those vehicles, but I do think weone thing we haven't done yet is podcasts. We're we're that is that is definitelysomething that we would love to see you guys see you guys doing.One question that I have for you, Bettina. You know the just afew few days ago, the time that we're recording this, few days ago, as a super bowl. You see these brands, you know, spendinga gajillion dollars on super bowl ads. You know, a lot of themwere compelling. I loved, I love what Tiede did for the Super Bowl. But when, when you're working with brands like that, and obviously forthe person listening to this being a BB company, if you know, yousaw a few BB companies doing things or around the super bowl. Where wheredo you see brands seeing the most success in taking a from a large kindof TV campaign like that but then supplementing it with like ancillary activity on socialkind of pointing back to that campaign, I saw verizon do it really wellwith with their first responder campaign and that...

...they have dedicated landing page to,you know, talking about you know, sharing stories, back to your pointearlier, sharing stories of these first responders and and the the lives that they'vesaved and the impact that they've made, with kind of the hook being,you know, they make the call. I think was what the taggling was. They make the call, we make that call happen, and that wasto me just really, really powerful use case. And then I started lookingat their social activity around that and they had great visual video stories that theywere telling to compliment that big campaign. Have you seen other examples of thatthat folks listening to this could take a look at to just get an ideaof? And how do you take a big splash like the super bowl orsomething like, you know, your your booth at sales force, a dreamforce, you know, a big event, and then splice it into kind ofmicro activity on on social via video? Yeah, so what I think isreally useful, and let me just explain a little bit of the mechanicsof the Super Bowl right. Yeah, so there's the expend and what theycall that is a tent pole event. Okay, it's a tent pole eventand around it. So if you think of a tent, there's sort ofin a circus tent, there's in the middle, right, there's this eventthere's lots of things leading up to that and afterwards. So what you dowith the Super Bowl is you have this main asset, if you call itthat, a video, right, it tells a certain story, and soyou pregame it and then you post game it. So the pregame is,in our industry, buying lots of views on youtube, and lots of them. So so you can tread, so you can build anticipation about the storythat you're going to tell so that when the super bowl add airs, peopleare what? Not Everybody, obviously,...

...but a lot of people are like, Oh my God, I've seen this before, this is so cool.It's in the Super Bowl, right, and I know about it way foreverybody else did, so I can talk about it a little bit more,right. Yeah, and you know, I can tell the person that justwent to the bathroom in the break that what it's about, right. Andso then, let's say, during the halftime show, like, Oh myGod, I just saw this and it's real. It was really a powerfulmessage. So what you have to do with your many message is get peopleto act. Right at call to action and for a brand, the callto action her Rizon is we're good people, right, purpose driven advertising. Thisthe newest trend out there. So we're good people and look at whatwe've been able to do, because millennials and postmillennials are very motivated by seeinga purpose behind what the brands that they talk about, that they like,do right. So, for I'll give a personal example. Lift I hasa very different image in the market than Ber yeah, right, boober isthese these these cocky programmers. They have problems respecting others, whether their womenor their drivers or anything else. Lift is known for being sort of justthe nicer people. You the drivers are taken better care of, they treattheir employees better. So some people really care about that. Some people justcare about the price or the convenience or something. But you know, Iconsider myself a feminist and if I can't afford it, sometimes lift there's alittle bit more expensive. I'll compare the prices, but if it's not abig, big difference, like, let's say ten dollars difference or the tripright, then I will use lift.

I will choose if in doubt,you say, a line with your values. Yeah, because, and this iswhat verizon is doing right, they're saying, if in doubt, useverizon, not atnt. So. So then after the Super Bowl they haveto reinforce that message. They have to keep going, and this is whatneed to be marketers often don't see. They give one consistent message the wholetime and they do always on advertising, and that's great, but that isonly so effective because it's somewhat robotic, right, and it doesn't take intoaccount like this, that humans react a lot to storytelling, that they reactto visuals, that they react to what's going on in their commune Ay andthat they're people. They are people. They are not just the buyer ofvideo advertising at an agency where, they're not just the purchaser of crm software. Right. They are people, and if you think about that, youcan actually do some really smart things. You can treat things as a campaign, not always on but as a campaign, and say, okay, now we'retelling this story. We have a new product and this product matters becauseof x. We have to tell that story. You know, tell themwhat you're going to tell them, tell them and tell them what you toldthem. Totally be Tina. This has been fantastic. I really appreciate yousharing this insight with us. If there's somebody out there listening. I wantto stay connected with you or they want to learn more about pixability. What'sthe best way for them to go about doing both of those things? Well, going to our website, faxabilitycom healing, emailing me directly hind at pixabilitycom Hi, and also text me. We have all of these able S.One, s seven, Sezero, five, seven, seven two. So generouswith our knowledge and that's how how...

...we've been customers and obviously all thematerials that we publish are out there for everybody to look at, case studiesand all of that up, and I'm sure that they can also contact youto make that connection. Absolutely. If you have no luck finding Bettina Online, which I don't think you're going to have any problem doing, go veryto reach out to me as well, James and Sweet Fish Mediacom. Makesure to check out fixability, pixabilitycom betina. Again, thank you so much foryour time today. This has been fantastic and I really appreciate it verywelcome. Thank you again for having to James. There are lots of waysto build a community and we've chosen to build the beadd growth community through thispodcast, but because of the way podcasts work, it's really hard to engagewith our listeners and without engagement it's tough to build a great community. Sohere's what we've decided to do. We're organizing small dinners across the country withour listeners and guests. No sales pitches, no agenda, just great conversations withlike minded people. Will Talk Business, we'll talk family, will talk goalsand dreams, will build friendships. So if you'd like to be apart of a beatb growth dinner in a sitting near you, go to beto be growth dinnerscom. That's be to be growth dinnerscom. Thank you somuch for listening. Until next time.

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