613: What is Design Thinking? w/ Peter Sena

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Peter Sena, CEO and Chief Creative Officer at Digital Surgeons.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petersena/

Looking for a guaranteed way to createcontent that resonates with your audience? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clientsand let them choose the topic of the interview, because if your ideal clientscare about the topic, there's a good chance the rest of your audience willcare about it too. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening tothe BE TOB growth show, podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieveexplosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources?You've come to the right place. I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carberry.Let's get it into the show. Welcome back to the BEB growth show.We are here today with Pete Senna. He is the CEO and chief creativeofficer at digital surgeons. Pee. How you doing today, but awesome.Thanks for for having me. I am excited to chat with you today,Pete. We're going to be talking about actually a talk that you have givento Yale. You've given it it several...

...companies and it's around this idea ofthe one thing that will change the way you think and in essence, we'regoing to be talking about design thinking. I know I've I've heard a lotof people talking about design thinking, Pete, but I don't know that I fullyhave my head around it. So this is actually going to be areally helpful conversation for me as well, and I think I will steners aregoing to take away a ton from it. But before we dive into that,Pete, I'd love for you to just explain to listeners, getting alittle bit of context about what you do at digital surgeons and how you guysare helping folks. Yeah, absolutely, I think you know, one ofthe things I always like to share with folks that don't aren't as aware ofdigital surgeons is just a little bit about my background. So I'm a designerdeveloper by trade, so, you know, kind of cut my teeth really helpingto put together marketing programs. I've worked across a number of different industries, be Tobb Toc of worked up, you know, with product companies,etc. And what ultimately I decided to...

...go on and start back in twothousand and four thousand and five was a digital agency which at the time wasa very, very avant garde thing but now obviously has been really completely commoditized. And you know, one of the things over the past decade that I'velearned as we've shaped our position, the digital surgeons now today Word Design InnovationAgency, and we really specialize in one thing, which is we help companiesexplore and event new ways for them to reach and connect with their audiences,and we typically do that across new and emerging digital channels. So we often, for I know, a lot of the groups on the call here are, you know, at a management or director or executive level, typically inBETB organizations, and we work with a lot of BB companies to really helpthem innovate, to help them think about their current processes and their current willbe, like to call digital literacy, and how they're using digital whether itbe through data or experiences or products, to really create a better experience,a better connected experience for their end audiences.

So, to your point, oneof the things that we've done a lot of a lot of talks andworkshops around is this idea of what's the one thing that can change the waythat you think can operate, and it's design. And you know design fora very long time, you know. Again, not knowing how much backgroundsome of the folks in the call have designed for a long time was reallysomething that it was what creative people did. It was the you know, itis pretty colors and fonts and making things look good, so as graphicarts and that sort of thing. And I think you know what's started tohappen now, and the sea sweets, people are really realizing that taking thathuman center, that sort of customer centric approach to how you design your products, your services and your experiences, that is creating a transformational shifting companies.It's one of the reasons we see, you know, entirely new business modelshappening. You know, it's why companies like, you know, lever whenand bought dollar shape club. You know, I think if you can't beat them, buy them right. So we're seeing a really interesting thing in themarket right now with changing the way people think about product development, changing theway people think about marketing, and what...

...it really comes down to is thisthing that has been around for twenty three years, which is design thinking.So when you're when you're stepping into an organization and and you are explaining thisidea of design thinking, you know, you, as we were talking offlineabout, you know, just about kind of how you structure the talk.You start it by having them think about a new product that can benefit realpeople and then, once they're in that kind of frame of mind, talkto us about how you then kind of guide the audience so that they reallyget an understanding of how design thinking can impact how they're going to market withthe product or service that they're bringing. Absolutely so I think you know,in the case of many of the folks on the call and the listeners here, you know, you might be used to siload or matrix organizations in which, you know, a functional department group is responsible for one thing, whetherit be engineering or customer service or logistics operations, and oftentimes these groups,yeah, there's a very streamlined stage gate...

...process which, by design, youknow, creates a sort of kind of one horizontal stage gate for how peopleoperate and connect each other. So I think, well, we talked aboutthis on thinking to your point, one of the first things be introduces theelement of play and the element of exploration which, as many of the exactslisten me in the call know, is the Millennium Workforce today is looking tobe engaged in a very, very different way where they don't want to besitting in you know, cubical sitting around the same sort of fixed meetings.We're sort of powerpoints do the talking. They want to be much more collaborativein the way that they're in age. They want that constant feedback loop andthey want to be really involved in a much more hands out way. Sowhat we typically do when we do that exercise is we just play a gamewhere we're helping to create some prompts and in those prompts, you know,we ask people to sort of basically take take an arbitrary list of APPS andArbulatory list of objects and then audiences and...

...then combine them together and to makesomething interesting. So, for example, you know, one of the APPthe things in the list might be youtube. Another one on the list from mightbe an object like a toblet, and then another list will come fromsomething like audiences. So Youtube, tablet and busy parents. How do youcombine those three things together to create something entirely new inside Your Business? Soto be to be tech companies here. You know, maybe you have alarge amount of new parents in the workforce and you're looking to create a tabletbased application that deploys videos on Youtube on how they can be an executive anda parent and specialize or work. Quite found that typically that would fall undera human resources per view, but as and as an executive, understanding thatnow, as your workforce is growing up and you having children, becoming firston parents or, you know having kids, they're growing up, needing to createa product or service internally that can both service your teams internally but thenalso be something that potentially can go on...

...to your audience. That's a goodexample of how, literally in just thirty seconds, just from you know,combining things from different columns, if we start playing and introducing this idea ofsort of gaming into the workplace now the sudden, you can get creativity fromeverywhere. So when I talk about design thinking, there's a lot of Lauraaround design thinking. There's a lot of buzz words. You know, allthe major major corporations now are behind it. IDM just launched, launched a globalinitiative on design. We have large companies coming into the space now likeenvision, which launch, which started out is just a UX prototyping software andnow it's taking over, you know, large fortune a hundred companies in termsof how they operate, but it's not thinking. Is just about bringing backcritical thinking. It's about bringing back problem solving and you know, I hateto say it, but you know I don't want to sort of take themask off here, but the reality is all design thinking is. It's justit's a process for solving problems through observation and iteration. It's pretty much thescientific method and you know some of the...

...greatest things that came out of processeslike six sigma and that sort of thing. It's it's being able to take allthe best thinking, put it together and then have that that sort oftesting their approach. So it's how big companies can really think and operate ina lean way like a start up, but still be able to leverage allthe infrastructure and all the formal processes that they already have in place that havegotten them to the level that their accident. Could you maybe share an example ofa product or a new service that a company introduced that came as aresult of design thinking and kind of walk through how it came to be?Absolutely so. One of the clients that we are working with is a globalutility and they're located in number of different countries, but one of the thingsthat we helped them with was by doing an innovation some it with them.We were able to teach their sort of line level managers how to do somethingcalled a five act interview, and basically...

...what we did is we taught themhow to use design thinking to to interview, to ask open any questions. Andwhat we helped them to do was we basically helped them save a fewmillion dollars on an initiative that they were going to be executing and we helpedthem really understand exactly the needs that their teams had. And we basically didwas we we talked to a number of different user groups. One of themwas customer service, and what we helped enable the managers to do that we'reworking on this digital transformation initiative, as we helped enable the managers to talkto their customer service people to understand the biggest pain points, in the biggestpoints of friction that the customer service agents were having that then their consumer,their customers, were having. So by being able to unify the problems usingdesign thinking, by being able to give them the tools on how they couldcollect this information and distill in a uniform way, we were able to helpthem realize is that the problem that they thought they had was actually very differentfrom the problem they really had. So...

...then, instead of launching a largeinitiative which was estimated to take about two or three years, when their workwith some of the larger consultancies, that was a really good long term plan. But we helped them implement some very small iterative solutions which largely helped themwith improving customer satisfaction. So metrics like net promoter score, you know,helping to drive up net promoter score, which still works pretty well here inthe states. It's not as it's not as useful, I think, globally, but help to drive up that promoter score, which was improving customer experienceand also helping to improve employee satisfaction, which largely is going to long term, contribute to both morale and reduce attrition. So we were able to do islook at an entirely different set of metrics because we ask them entirely differentset of questions, and that's a really good example of how you can launcha product or service improvement in turn internally using this line of thinking. Sothat's one example that I would give that...

...has now relaunched an entirely new fearsof initiatives and that and that one project was so successful that now we've beenasked actually to next month we're going over to Europe to train and do someof these programs in the European office, just buist on some of the successthat it's odd here domestically. That makes perfect sense. It makes perfect sense. Pee If there's somebody listening to this, they want to stay connected with you, they want to learn more about digital surgeons. What's the best wayfor them to go about doing that? I would say I'm pretty active ontwitter. My twitter handles at peezn at Pete Seena. Would love to hearany questions or feedback from you. Guys. Get are bad. We really honoredto be on the show with you here today and would love to comeback if I can offer some value to those listening. Could also be reachon our website, digital surgeonscom. But really, I take them think I'mmost interesting in there. was just you know, how does this information todaybeen helpful or not helpful, so that I can continue to really help inspirepeople to think differently in to connect with...

...their customers and they're employees in adifferent way. I love it, Pete, thank you so much for your timetoday. Man, this has been this has been really helpful for meand I think our listeners are going to get a ton of value out ofhis as well. So I really appreciate it. Awesome. Thanks you forhelping me. Really appreciate it. If you've been getting valued from this podcast, you can help us reach more people by reviewing the show on itunes.Here's how you can leave a review in less than a minute. Open yourpodcast APP and tap the search icon in the bottom right corner. Type inB toob growth, then select our show. Once you're there, tap the reviewstab and tell us what you think of the show. These reviews helpus out of time. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

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