613: What is Design Thinking? w/ Peter Sena

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Peter Sena, CEO and Chief Creative Officer at Digital Surgeons.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petersena/

Looking for a guaranteed way to createcontent that resonates with your audience, start upodcast interview yourideal clients and let them choose the topic of the interview, because, ifyour ideal clients care about the topic, there's a good chance, the rest of youraudience will care about. It too, learn more at sweetfish media COM, you're. Listening to the B T B, Groveshow podcast dedicated to helping B to be executives, anche, eplosine Gron,when you're looking for techniques and strategies, O tools and resources,you've come to the right place, I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carmary.Let's get it into the show. Welcome back to the baby, Groth show we're here today with Pete Senna. He is the CEO and chief creative officer anddigital surgeons P, how you doing it something r Ha me. I am excited to Chotwith you today pet we're going to be talking about actually a talk that youhave given t a Yale you've given in it...

...several companies and it's around thisidea of you K, ow the one thing that will change the way you think and inessence we're we're going to be talking about design thinking. I know I've.I've heard a lot of people talking about design, thinking pe, but I Idon't know that I fully have my an arond it, so this is actually going tobe a really helpful conversation for me as well, and I think our listeners aregoing to take away a ton from it, but before we dive into that pt I'd lovefor you to just explain. The listeners give hem a little bit of context aboutwhat you do at digital surgeons and how you guys are helping folks yeah.Absolutely, I think you know one of the things I l was like to show with books.That d aren't as aware of Thega surgons he's just a little bit about mybackground, so I'm a designer of developer if by trade. So you know,Kinda cut my teeth. You know really helping to put together marketingprograms. I've worked across a number of different industries. BTBBC workedup, you know, withot a companies, etcetera wh. What ultimately, I decidedto go on and start back in two thousand...

...and four tesend five was a DIGEL agencywhich at the time was a very, very M Avane guard thing, but now obviouslyhas been. You know really completely commoditize, and you know one of thethings over the past decade that I've learned that we've shaped our position:the Digal surgeion now today words on Innovation Agency and be reallyspecialized in one thing, which is we help companies explore and and ven newways for them to reach and connect with the audiences, and we ticically do thatacross new and emerging digital channels. So we often for I know a lotof the groups on the call here. Are you know, management or a director or orexecutive level, tycically INPE, O B organizations, and we were with a lotof B companies to really help them, innovate and to help them think abouttheir current processes and they're. Current, what we like to call digitalliteracy and how they're using digital, whether it be through data orexperiences or products, to really create a better experience, a betterconnected experience for their end...

...audiences. So to your a point, one ofthe things that that we've done a lot o a lot of talks and workshops around isthis idea of? What's the one thing that can change the way that you think andoperate and it's design, and you know designed for a very long time. You knowagain not knowing how much background some, the foolksme call have desied fora long time was really something that you n. It was w what creetive peopledid. It was h. You know it was pretty colors and fomts, and and and makingthings look good, so was graphic arts and that sort of thing- and I think youknow- what's started to happen now in the sea sweeds people are reallyrealizing that taking that human center, that sort of Pesterner centric approachto how you design your products, your services and your experiences, that iscreating the transformation of shifting companies. It's one of the reasons wesee you know entirely new business models happening. You know it's whycompanies like Uni Lever, Wen and bought dollar shape club. You know ifthey, if you can't beat 'em, buy 'em right, so we're seeing a reallyinteresting thing in the market right now, with changing the way people think aboutproduct development, changing the way...

...people think about marketing and whatit really comes down to is this thing that has been around for twenty thirtyyears, which is designe thinking. So when you're, when you're stepping intoan organization and- and you are explaining this idea of design thinkingas we were talking offline about, you know just about kind, how you structurethe talk you, you start it by having them think about a new product that canbenefit. You know real people and then once they're in that kind of frame ofmind, talk to us about an F, how you then, and of guide the audience so thatthey really get an understanding of how designed thinking can impactthey're going to market with the product or service that they'rebringing absolutely so. I think you know in the case of many of the fooksin the call and the listeners here you know, Y, you might be used to fiload ormatrix organizations in which you know a functional department group isresponsible for one thing, whether it be engineering or customer service orlogistics, or operations and oftentimes.

These groups yeah there's a very streamlined stage. Gate process which,by design you know, creates a certainl kind of one. Horizontal Stage gave forhow people operate and connect each other. So I think wwe. We Talk Aout thon thinking to your point. One of the first who e introduced is the elementof play in the element of exploration which, as many of the EXEC Mostman enthe call now is the Millenniam workforce today is looking to beengaged in a very, very different way. Right. They don't want to be sitting inyou know, cubicle sitting around the same sort of you know, fixed meetingswhere it will sort of power points do the talking. They want to be much morecoogrative in the way that they're engaged. They want that constantfeedback loop and they want to be really involved in in a much more handsour way. So what we typically do when we do that exercise, is we just play agame where W we're helping to create some prompts and in those prompts youknow, we ask people to sort of basically take take an arbitrary listof APS and Arbo Tru list of objects and...

...then audiences and then combine themtogether and to make something interesting. So, for example, you knowone of the th things in the list might be utue another one on the list mightbe an object like a tablet, and then another list will come from somethinglike audiences, so youhume, tablic and busy parents. How do you combine thosethree things together to create something entirely new insede yourbusiness, so ter be to be cech companies here y know. Maybe you have alarge amount of new parents in the workforce and you're looking to createa tablet based application that deploys videos on you tube on how they can beanexecutive and a parent and specially as a workwhite found notypic that thatwould fall under a human resourceis por view, but as an s, a executiveunderstanding that now, as your workforces, growing up and havingchildren becoming first on parents or you know, having kids there growing upneeding to create a pro for service internally, that can bull serviceyourteens internally, but then also be...

...something that petentially can go ontto your audience. So that's a good example of how, literally in justthirty seconds just from you know, combining things from different columnsif Yeu start playing and intreacing this idea I' sort of gaming into theworkwace. Now all of a sudden, you can get creativety from everywhere. So whenI talk about this, I'm thinking there's a lot of lure around hat tinking.There's a lot of buzzwords. You know all the major major n corporations noware behind. It IBM just launched launchd a global initiative. Umondesign! U Know we have large companies coming into the space nowlike invision, which launch which started out is just a UX portytypicsoftware. Now it's taking over, you know large, you know Fortunte hundreedRT companies in terms of how they operate, but I thinking is just aboutbringing back critical thinking, it's about bringing back problem solving,and you know I hate to say it, but you know I don't want to sort of take themask off here, but the reality Allthe, I thinking is, is it's just it's aprocess for solving problems through observation, iteration T it's prettymuch the scientific method, and you...

...know some of the greatest things thatcame out of processes like six sigma and that sort of thing it's it's beingable to take all the best thinking put it together and then had that that sortf test on there in approach. So it's how big companies can really think andoperate in a lean way like a start up, but still be able to leverage all theoverscecture and all the stormal processes that they alreadyhave in place that have gotten them to the lovel that theyre afte that dildyou maybe share an example of a product or a new service that acompany introduced that came as a result of design, thinking and kind ofwalked through how how it came to be absolutely so um. One of the clientsthat we are working with is a global utility and they're located in you knowa number of different countries, but one of the things that we helped themwith was by doing an invation summit with them.We were able to teach their sort of...

...line level managers hod to do somethingcalled a fadact interview and basically, what we did is we taught them how touse as I'n thinking to to interview to ask open any questions and what wehelped them to do. Was We basically help them save a few million dollars onan inditiative that they are going to be executing and we help them reallyunderstand exactly the need that their teens had and what we basically did waswe. We talked to a number of different user groups. One of them was posomherservice and what we helped enable the managers to do that were working onthis detidious insformation Ishoulive, as we helped enable the managers totalk to their customer service, people to understand the biggest painpointsand the biggest points of friction that the customer service agents were havingthat then their consumer, their customers were having so by being ableto unify the problems using as I'm thinking by being able to give them thetools on how they could collect this information. US still in a uniform way.We were able to help them realize. Is that the problem that they thought theyhad was actually very different from...

...the pae they really had? And then,instead of watching a a large initiative which was estimated to takeabout two or three years m, when they were working with some of the largerconsultanies? That was a really good, long term plan. But we helped ininplement some very small metartive solutions which largely help them withimproving customer satisfaction. So metrics like netpromotor score, youknow helping to drive up nepier score, which you now still works pretty wellhere in the states. It's not as Um. It sounds useful, I think globally, buthelped to drive up nepomotor score, which was improving customer experienceand also helping to improve enpoyic satisfaction, which largely is going tolong term, contribute to both morale and reduced atrition. So what Wewere todo is look at an entirely different set of metrics, because we asked anentirely different set of questions and that's a really good example of how youcan launch a product or service improvement in turn intertately usingthis. This line of thinking so that that's one example that I would givethat M has now relaunched an entirely...

...new ters of initiatives and that andthat one project was so successful that now we've been asked actually to thnext month, we're going over to Europe to train and do some of these programsin in he European offince, just Bisse on some of the success that it's outhere domestically. That makes perfect sense that makes perfience p. Ifthere's somebody listening to this, they want to stay connected with you.They Wan to learn more about digital surgeons. What's the best way for themto go. By doing that, I would say: I'm proactive on twitter, my my cindalsApizzza Pete S, Ena would love to hear any questions or feedback from you guysgoot ar bad wil realy honor to be on the show with you her today and wouldlove to come back. If, if I could offer some value to to tha was listening, Icould also be rechon our website. DIGITAL SURGONS DOT COM, but really Ithe he thing, I'm most interested in thiis. Just you know. How does thisinformation today then helpful or or not helpful, so that I can continue toreally help anfire people to think...

...differently and to connuct with theirtheir customers and their employes in a different way? Thank you. So, MUC, true time today,man, this has been this's, been really helpful for me and I think ourlisteners are going to get a ton of value on a business lell. So I reallyappreciate it. Oie. I keep for having Ro pe Sitit Ave you've been getting value from thispodcast. You can help us reach more people by reviewing the show on itenshereis how you can leave a review an less than a minute open your pod Taftat and Tapp the search igon in bottom rad, corn type in B to b Grof thenselect our shol once you're. There capthe reviews to have and tell us whatyou think of the SHEP. These reviews help us out of time. Thank you so muchfor listening until next time.

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