613: What is Design Thinking? w/ Peter Sena

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Peter Sena, CEO and Chief Creative Officer at Digital Surgeons.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/petersena/

Looking for a guaranteed way to create content that resonates with your audience? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients and let them choose the topic of the interview, because if your ideal clients care about the topic, there's a good chance the rest of your audience will care about it too. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the BE TOB growth show, podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources? You've come to the right place. I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carberry. Let's get it into the show. Welcome back to the BEB growth show. We are here today with Pete Senna. He is the CEO and chief creative officer at digital surgeons. Pee. How you doing today, but awesome. Thanks for for having me. I am excited to chat with you today, Pete. We're going to be talking about actually a talk that you have given to Yale. You've given it it several...

...companies and it's around this idea of the one thing that will change the way you think and in essence, we're going to be talking about design thinking. I know I've I've heard a lot of people talking about design thinking, Pete, but I don't know that I fully have my head around it. So this is actually going to be a really helpful conversation for me as well, and I think I will steners are going to take away a ton from it. But before we dive into that, Pete, I'd love for you to just explain to listeners, getting a little bit of context about what you do at digital surgeons and how you guys are helping folks. Yeah, absolutely, I think you know, one of the things I always like to share with folks that don't aren't as aware of digital surgeons is just a little bit about my background. So I'm a designer developer by trade, so, you know, kind of cut my teeth really helping to put together marketing programs. I've worked across a number of different industries, be Tobb Toc of worked up, you know, with product companies, etc. And what ultimately I decided to...

...go on and start back in two thousand and four thousand and five was a digital agency which at the time was a very, very avant garde thing but now obviously has been really completely commoditized. And you know, one of the things over the past decade that I've learned as we've shaped our position, the digital surgeons now today Word Design Innovation Agency, and we really specialize in one thing, which is we help companies explore and event new ways for them to reach and connect with their audiences, and we typically do that across new and emerging digital channels. So we often, for I know, a lot of the groups on the call here are, you know, at a management or director or executive level, typically in BETB organizations, and we work with a lot of BB companies to really help them innovate, to help them think about their current processes and their current will be, like to call digital literacy, and how they're using digital whether it be through data or experiences or products, to really create a better experience, a better connected experience for their end audiences.

So, to your point, one of the things that we've done a lot of a lot of talks and workshops around is this idea of what's the one thing that can change the way that you think can operate, and it's design. And you know design for a very long time, you know. Again, not knowing how much background some of the folks in the call have designed for a long time was really something that it was what creative people did. It was the you know, it is pretty colors and fonts and making things look good, so as graphic arts and that sort of thing. And I think you know what's started to happen now, and the sea sweets, people are really realizing that taking that human center, that sort of customer centric approach to how you design your products, your services and your experiences, that is creating a transformational shifting companies. It's one of the reasons we see, you know, entirely new business models happening. You know, it's why companies like, you know, lever when and bought dollar shape club. You know, I think if you can't beat them, buy them right. So we're seeing a really interesting thing in the market right now with changing the way people think about product development, changing the way people think about marketing, and what...

...it really comes down to is this thing that has been around for twenty three years, which is design thinking. So when you're when you're stepping into an organization and and you are explaining this idea of design thinking, you know, you, as we were talking offline about, you know, just about kind of how you structure the talk. You start it by having them think about a new product that can benefit real people and then, once they're in that kind of frame of mind, talk to us about how you then kind of guide the audience so that they really get an understanding of how design thinking can impact how they're going to market with the product or service that they're bringing. Absolutely so I think you know, in the case of many of the folks on the call and the listeners here, you know, you might be used to siload or matrix organizations in which, you know, a functional department group is responsible for one thing, whether it be engineering or customer service or logistics operations, and oftentimes these groups, yeah, there's a very streamlined stage gate...

...process which, by design, you know, creates a sort of kind of one horizontal stage gate for how people operate and connect each other. So I think, well, we talked about this on thinking to your point, one of the first things be introduces the element of play and the element of exploration which, as many of the exacts listen me in the call know, is the Millennium Workforce today is looking to be engaged in a very, very different way where they don't want to be sitting in you know, cubical sitting around the same sort of fixed meetings. We're sort of powerpoints do the talking. They want to be much more collaborative in the way that they're in age. They want that constant feedback loop and they want to be really involved in a much more hands out way. So what we typically do when we do that exercise is we just play a game where we're helping to create some prompts and in those prompts, you know, we ask people to sort of basically take take an arbitrary list of APPS and Arbulatory list of objects and then audiences and...

...then combine them together and to make something interesting. So, for example, you know, one of the APP the things in the list might be youtube. Another one on the list from might be an object like a toblet, and then another list will come from something like audiences. So Youtube, tablet and busy parents. How do you combine those three things together to create something entirely new inside Your Business? So to be to be tech companies here. You know, maybe you have a large amount of new parents in the workforce and you're looking to create a tablet based application that deploys videos on Youtube on how they can be an executive and a parent and specialize or work. Quite found that typically that would fall under a human resources per view, but as and as an executive, understanding that now, as your workforce is growing up and you having children, becoming first on parents or, you know having kids, they're growing up, needing to create a product or service internally that can both service your teams internally but then also be something that potentially can go on...

...to your audience. That's a good example of how, literally in just thirty seconds, just from you know, combining things from different columns, if we start playing and introducing this idea of sort of gaming into the workplace now the sudden, you can get creativity from everywhere. So when I talk about design thinking, there's a lot of Laura around design thinking. There's a lot of buzz words. You know, all the major major corporations now are behind it. IDM just launched, launched a global initiative on design. We have large companies coming into the space now like envision, which launch, which started out is just a UX prototyping software and now it's taking over, you know, large fortune a hundred companies in terms of how they operate, but it's not thinking. Is just about bringing back critical thinking. It's about bringing back problem solving and you know, I hate to say it, but you know I don't want to sort of take the mask off here, but the reality is all design thinking is. It's just it's a process for solving problems through observation and iteration. It's pretty much the scientific method and you know some of the...

...greatest things that came out of processes like six sigma and that sort of thing. It's it's being able to take all the best thinking, put it together and then have that that sort of testing their approach. So it's how big companies can really think and operate in a lean way like a start up, but still be able to leverage all the infrastructure and all the formal processes that they already have in place that have gotten them to the level that their accident. Could you maybe share an example of a product or a new service that a company introduced that came as a result of design thinking and kind of walk through how it came to be? Absolutely so. One of the clients that we are working with is a global utility and they're located in number of different countries, but one of the things that we helped them with was by doing an innovation some it with them. We were able to teach their sort of line level managers how to do something called a five act interview, and basically...

...what we did is we taught them how to use design thinking to to interview, to ask open any questions. And what we helped them to do was we basically helped them save a few million dollars on an initiative that they were going to be executing and we helped them really understand exactly the needs that their teams had. And we basically did was we we talked to a number of different user groups. One of them was customer service, and what we helped enable the managers to do that we're working on this digital transformation initiative, as we helped enable the managers to talk to their customer service people to understand the biggest pain points, in the biggest points of friction that the customer service agents were having that then their consumer, their customers, were having. So by being able to unify the problems using design thinking, by being able to give them the tools on how they could collect this information and distill in a uniform way, we were able to help them realize is that the problem that they thought they had was actually very different from the problem they really had. So...

...then, instead of launching a large initiative which was estimated to take about two or three years, when their work with some of the larger consultancies, that was a really good long term plan. But we helped them implement some very small iterative solutions which largely helped them with improving customer satisfaction. So metrics like net promoter score, you know, helping to drive up net promoter score, which still works pretty well here in the states. It's not as it's not as useful, I think, globally, but help to drive up that promoter score, which was improving customer experience and also helping to improve employee satisfaction, which largely is going to long term, contribute to both morale and reduce attrition. So we were able to do is look at an entirely different set of metrics because we ask them entirely different set of questions, and that's a really good example of how you can launch a product or service improvement in turn internally using this line of thinking. So that's one example that I would give that...

...has now relaunched an entirely new fears of initiatives and that and that one project was so successful that now we've been asked actually to next month we're going over to Europe to train and do some of these programs in the European office, just buist on some of the success that it's odd here domestically. That makes perfect sense. It makes perfect sense. Pee If there's somebody listening to this, they want to stay connected with you, they want to learn more about digital surgeons. What's the best way for them to go about doing that? I would say I'm pretty active on twitter. My twitter handles at peezn at Pete Seena. Would love to hear any questions or feedback from you. Guys. Get are bad. We really honored to be on the show with you here today and would love to come back if I can offer some value to those listening. Could also be reach on our website, digital surgeonscom. But really, I take them think I'm most interesting in there. was just you know, how does this information today been helpful or not helpful, so that I can continue to really help inspire people to think differently in to connect with...

...their customers and they're employees in a different way. I love it, Pete, thank you so much for your time today. Man, this has been this has been really helpful for me and I think our listeners are going to get a ton of value out of his as well. So I really appreciate it. Awesome. Thanks you for helping me. Really appreciate it. If you've been getting valued from this podcast, you can help us reach more people by reviewing the show on itunes. Here's how you can leave a review in less than a minute. Open your podcast APP and tap the search icon in the bottom right corner. Type in B toob growth, then select our show. Once you're there, tap the reviews tab and tell us what you think of the show. These reviews help us out of time. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time.

In-Stream Audio Search

NEW

Search across all episodes within this podcast

Episodes (1776)