610: Avoid These 2 Prospecting Mistakes w/ Dave Brock

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Dave Brock, CEO at Partners in Excellence and Author of Sales Manager Survival Guide.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/davebrock/

A relationship with the right referralpartner could be a game changer for any B to be company. So what? If you couldreverse engineer these relationships at a moment's notice, start a podcastinvite potential referral partners to be guess on your show and grow yourreferral network faster than ever learn more at sweetfish media dtcom, you're listening to the Beta, be growth,show a podcast dedicated to help hi be to be executives achieve explosivegrowth, whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools andresources. You've come to the right place, I'm James Carburry and I'mJonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the baby growth show weere here today with Dave Brock Heis, the CEO at partners in excellence he'salso the author of sales manager, survibl guide Dave. How are you doingitdamangreat James thanks for inviting me happy New Year Happy New Year? Thisis the first interview, I've done in twenty eighteen, and I am reallyexcited that that you ere the guy that I'm talking to this morning day. We hada great conversation a week or two ago, and and I'm really pomped adto sharesome of the wisdom that you shared with me on the call you know in in arecorded for a mat like this. So I appreciate your time well, thankhopefully this forshadows great things for to Valtiatd YS. Yes, I hope so too.So so dave you, the C E O partners, Ave, excellent syou, also wrote a bookcalled salesmanager survival guide. Tell our listeners ist to give hem alittle bit of context before we dive in to w we're going to be talking abouttoday, which is around prospecting, but yo explain to our listeners which whatyou and your team are doing at partners and excellence yeah we're a Buquiqueconsulting company. We we consult primarily in business strategy and the customer facing sides oforganization, so we tend to spend a lot...

...of time looking at issues aroundselling, how we reach our customers most effectively and efficiently soselling marketing in customer experience and our client base isprimarily gobal. I'd, say: Seven. Fifty corporations highly concentrated intechnology, industrial products of professional services and then for justkind of a brief synopsis of the Book that You wrote: Sales Ranagor survivalguide. Why did you want to write that book? Yeah th? That's the first of ofseveral books, I'm writing, but that was published about a year and a halfago, and I really focused on the role of the frontline sales manager is as wedo ar are consulting and as I look at people that that reach out to meetthrough Lincin in other venues, is I realize that sales managers, frontlinesales managers are really struggling. They don't have any great resource tolearn about how to do their job as as best possible. Oftentimes theiremanagers aren't coaching them very well. Oftentimes they've been put inthe rolebecause they've been a hot salesperson, but they really don't understand theirjob and how to be great at that job. So it really is almost a pragmatic deskguide to help h sales managers. You know help their kings achieve thehighest levels of performance O it. I love it Oday for the rest of ourconversation. Today we are going to be talking about UH prospecting. You weretelling me on our call a couple of weeks ago about the prospecting processthat you use in your own business, that your team uses in your business and Iloved it. I I too often Y W Y. You just get this spray and prey these verygeneric messags. I feel like the last couple of weeks. I've been talkingabout it a lot, but your approach to prospecting o flies directly in theface of of that approach, and so it was...

...very refreshing for me to hear you talkabout it. Can we start by just talking again at a at a high level day? How doyou think about prospecting and then how has that shaped? What you and yourteam are actually doing? Well prospecting is a critical part ofeverybody's business and every every salesperson's business. Regardless ofhow experienced you are, how big a reputation you have and andall that kind of thing I mean everybody in our company- has been at least a aVP of sales and thirty large companies m. You know so we have. You know fairlybig reputations and very strong networks. However, in spite of that, Imean to really build the business at the volume we expect expect it to be is prospecting has tobecome a part of our daily and weekly activity and so often like with so manysales people. We find excuses not to do the that. I mean most of us,don't like prospecting, and you know N R. Our Role I mean we have you know weboth as consultants, we deliver services, so I spend m most of my time in work sessions andmeetings with our clients helping them. You know, identify the issues thatthey're trying to attack, identify strategies for doing that and so n, sowe're spending time doing delivery work. You know, and a lot of our time isspent doing saleswork in in terms of developing opportunities and movingthem through the pipepline, but that all starts with prospecting, and so wehave to just as as every other salesperson has to do. We have to berigorous about our prospecting, so we do a couple of different things. Infact, the one Kemetric I measure myself and our team of fifteen people on everyweek is every Friday I get a...

...prospecting report and they send me onenumber. We we've clearly defined h our prospecting metric and that is a highlyimpactful conversation with somebody in our target personas andsomebody that we and it's somebody that we've never spoken to before, or atleast have not spoken two for a number of years. You know so there's some realrigor on what cats is a high quality prospect andconversation, and we don't adames with how do youet. It really is with thathigh quality conversation is, it really is. Is We're trying to engagepeople with certain kinds of conversations around business issuesimpacting them that we can help them with Honoso? It's it's not random callsit's not. How are you calls? It's not catching up. Calls theyare very focusedcalls on customers who, we believe have issues that we can address and it'seither they they've they may have reached out to us in some way orfrankly, we have you know, I I call it kind of a stockor mentality. Each oneof us is two: Do Three segments that we are developing, both our personalknowledge of and our our reputations, our visibility.So, for instance, I tend to be one of the guys in our company that focuses onsoftware, whether it's Sass, enterprize or or or things like that, I tend tofocus also on semiconductor and electronic components: Anontelecommunications. So I spend a lot of time that conferences in studying andlooking at the issues there, and so my prospectng is, I tend to reach out tofolks in that or in those organizations. I see something happening with acompany that that insay the...

...semiconductor segment and reach out inin kind of a cold way and sa you know thereare some issues that are inpactthat we believe are impacting your performance that you might be able toimprove. So those prospecting calls come from those kinds of things, soeach one of the the people on the team has a few industries that they stock,that they're very knowledgeable and that they have some level of reputation.So they can point to people. You Know Gee. We work with these people andthose people in Salen, partly to establish our credibility, but that wecan have more than a surface conversation. We can drill down. Youknow two or three levels, deep in our first call, so so having that rigor having that abilityto have a highly impactful conversation and being very focused on calling theright people and having the right discipline, regardless of where we arein the world, you know I may at anyone time be inEurope, Africa, Asia or North America or South America, but I still have toget my personal number is. I have to have six net new conversations everyweek, how much outr each do you typically have to do Dave to be able tohave six quality conversations? Well, we're very focused at it. So I mean ourprocess generally. Is is h, some initial emails? Maybe some initialphone calls with an executive assistant or something, but I mean, for instance,one hundred percent of my calls are scheduled. You know so. I've I've hadenough outreach, withsaan, executive assistant or enough out reached throughemail, or something like that that that you know my calls well, I'm lying. Maybe ninety percentare scheduled, and so I have a settime where, where an executive is expectinga call for me, we have you know a good...

...conversation. You know it's not lookingat. You know what problems are you having and do you want to buy ourservices? It's looking at having a good substanttive conversation. These guysmay not have an immediate need, but I want to start establishing thatrelationship. I know if I don't make my six calls this week, that I won't makemy number in the first quarter of two thousand and nineteen, and so, if I don't make those six calls,you know, while my business looks really good for two thousand andeighteen and so on. You know in two thousand and nineteen it starts lookinga little bit sketchy, so I have to have that prospect in discipline love whatwhat are some of the? I guess: WH N, when you're consulting other companiesaround around the art of prospecting. What are some of the mistakes that yousee them making most often, and and how do you advise them in that? That'sthat's a good question a and I think, one of the biggest mistakes. I see thatmaking it is going wider rather than hour. Okay, you know it. It seems thatpeople are so focused on volume in velocity that they cast a wider andwider and wider neck. You know to reach prospects. It's interesting. I talke toa client was doing some interviews of salespeople with a client pactually last week andthey have a very an outstanding system. That's producing really great results.You know they viciously narrow where they prospect. U,they know what their sweet spot is, and they focus very intensely on that sweetspot when they're tempted to to cast a Whiternet. They do exactly the opposite.They narrow it down and narrow their focus because they know that you knowthereare. There are enough customers in...

...that sweet spot for them to achievetheir business plan. Their challenge is just to reach those people, so theythey doubled down on trying to say you know, what's that sweet spot and how dowe kind of narrow the focus? This second thing I see people do, is theydon't pay attention to triggers? You know triggers that happen in theenvironment, whether it Maye in our case it's an organizational change orit may be a bad quarterly report, or it may be, is something disruptivehappening in the industry that we know ripples through and in will impact ourcustomers or something disruptive happening with one of their competitorsthat went back then. So you know, I don't see salespeople, I seesalespeople just randomly saying. Do you want to talk to be rather thansaying we noticed something happened in the industry with your company withyour customers or something that's likely to impact you. How are youdealing with that e? Are there any particular triggers day of going backto that that people should stay away from? I know that a lot of people youknow e. You saw that you just raised around a funding. Now I want to sellyou my thing. Maybe that is a good trigger, but are are there certaintriggers that you see that I don't know almost make you think I think you canget a litte more creative with it? No, I think I think you have to besensitive to how you approach somebody I mean so, for instance, we approach alot of people who are producing bad results. You know, and- and you knowclearly, I don't want to call a CEO or an evp of sales up and say Jeez, yourlast quarter sucked yeah. What are you doing about it? You know it's so youknow there's sensitivity to to how deal with the trigger and how you deal withthe news, but you know, I think I think you ought to you know so, and thatreally becomes from, I think our depth of understanding of what's happening inthe particular market segment. Does that make sense? It totally does inhearing you talk about this a couple of weeks ago Dave and then hearing you layout these two specific mistakes that...

...you see. You know not nerring yourfocus enough, not paying attention to triggers. This has been incrediblyhelpful. Is there anything else around prospecting day that you think ourlisteners should understand before we transition in the last part of thisinterview? I think you know it's just like kind of Mikee says you just do it.You know I'd say, Focus your prospecting. Effort t you know, gonarrowor wider rather than wider know what you're talking about look forthose triggers jump on the phone e. More! Do It inperson. You know, don't rely, you know sollny on social media and those kindsof things. Those though those are great tools, but a lot of the old schoolstuff of you know, sometimes when I'm traveling I'll call and make anappointment and show up on somebody's doorstep, or I I may not even make anappointment put our show up on somebody's doorstep and it's hard forthem to turn me down. If I'm showng, showing up on ther doorstep makes senseOu. But fundamentally you gotta do the Work Yep. One of my one of my goalsthis year is to meet with one hundred potential customers in person, and soyesterday I started going through and kind of napping out of the differentcities that I'm goin to target and the trips that I'm going to be making thereto to, because I I think that point of there's just something powerful thatcan happen when you're when you're in front of someone in person the trustthat you can build and the report that you can build. So I I'm absolutely bordwith with that idea day. F Th, I wantta. I want to close it down with one lastquestion. I love to ask Dave. What would you say is the legacy that youwant to leave? Well, that's that's a really important question. I think forall of us. If you look at my block my bog's entitled making a difference- andyou know one of the things that I've personally felt- and I think that thatI think everybody in our company feels is- we want to have an impact on...

...the lives of the people we work withand on the companies in the organizations, and so we want to makesure that that what we're doing is having an impact and making adifference- and you know it kind of is a virtuous cycle- is as long as we'rehaving an impact on these people. We create customers and clients for life.I love it Dave. If somebody wants to check out your book or they want tolearn more about partners and excellence or stay connected with you,what's the best way for them to go about doing all those things, love for them to order the book andreach out to me, it's on Amazon sales manager, survival, Guye dotcom, my blog,I I tend to block about h four point: Two business days a week is apartmentsin excellence, blog dotcom, I'm on Lintin, just look up Dave Brock, I'msouthern California or apartments. An excellence or tweter is David abrock.Thank you. So much for your time today, this has been fantastics. I reallyappreciative. It's been a pleasure o thank so much James. If you'RE ABE TO BE MARKETER, we wantto feature you on sites like Hoffington, post, social media, Examir and chiefmarker. Every week we send down a question related to be to be marking.We use the responses to those questions to fuel the content. We write forreally popular websites to head over to sweetfish media, dotcom, backlash,questions and sign up today. Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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