607: How to Blend Inbound with Outbound w/ Anthony Byrne

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Anthony Byrne, CEO at Product2Market.

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/anthonyebyrne/

Are you struggling to come up with original content weekend and week out? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clients, let them talk about what they care about most and never run out of content ideas again. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the BTB growth show, a podcast dedicated to help you BETB executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BB growth show. We are here today with Anthony Byrne. He has the CEO at product to market. Anthony, how you doing today, James? I'm doing well, very excited to be with you. Look the show. I'm excited to chat with you as well. Anthony. This is my first interview post Christmas and so we're back in the saddle and I'm stoked to chat with you. We're going to be talking about inbound marketing today, Anthony, and from a little bit different perspective, but before we do that I'd love for you to explain to our listeners just a little bit about product to market and what you and your team are up to over there. Yeah, awesome, sounds good. So, as you mentioned, I'm the CEEO and CO founder of product to market. We are an Irish company, we're based in Dublin and we provide a range of what we call sales development and inside sales as a service solutions. Right now we're laser focused on BTB and and tech and we have a seventy five percent team. We're actually growing at the moment, James. I think in by the end of January we hope to be sort of bet eighty five to ninety people. Wow, would about ten or eleven different European Nationalities Base in her office? That's incredible. So, Anthony, as we're talking offline, where you know, you obviously you guys are serving a lot of and a BB tech companies and we were talking about an...

...inbound marketing and as we were talking about it, we you know you. You were mentioning to me that your your career leading up to product to market and and kind of seeing inbound marketing come to fruition and now seeing, you know, what it's become today. Can you kind of rewind a bit and talk to us about kind of looking back at inbound marketing and how it is evolved over the years and then we'll talk about kind of what we can take from that and how that can impact what we're doing today. Yeah, that, yeah, it's great. I mean, I guess I've got an interesting bantage point. I mean, I will say a lot of my customers and clients and stakeholders who we work with our lennials and you know, they have the super smart they're super data driven with and they're all wonderful to work with. But a lot of them you never knew the world before, I guess, online and digital marketing. You know my own career, I suppose I started in selling as a career in sort of ninety nine, you know, the year two thousand. I worked actually in a couple of Irish newspapers and so each week guy was dealing with advertisers who are trying to get their content and their branded content into the newspaper. And back in the day we used to deal with, you know, deal in terms of CCPT, which is cospar thousand of subscribers and readers for all all you young kids. But what was interesting at the time that I used to think about quite a lot was is that we would we would be get building programs and selling advertising two folks who were really only addressing a very, very small part of their target market, right. So there the readership would be high, but we knew that they were trying to get their message to niches within that total readership. I guess as we got into sort of two thousand and two, two thousand and three, in two thousand and four out here in Europe, we saw the sort of the emerging of brands and btbes kind of going online to try and...

...find and win new customers and there was kind of an explosion. So everything in print sort of died resssed very, very, very deeply and I thought, you know, this is time for me to get into something new, and I actually I took a leap from working in advertising actually to work in marketing within a software organization here in actually in County Cork in Ireland, and their actual route to customer was actually true content. So I had to familiar on myself, you know, get get deep into PPC, get into content. We were quite good at sort of blogging and trying to push out our own content, your case studies, and I think we were kind of at the front edge of a, you know, of writing that wave a fairly adoption. Yeah, well, what was interesting then, as we sort of got into sort of two thousand and seven, two thousand and eight, was this just this massive explosion in what was called in bound marketing. And I think you know the Messiahs, Brian Halligan and our mess and on folks like that, who were sort of industry leading and sort of build out their own industry for themselves, really convinced the market that inbound marketing was the panacea, it was the way to go, and we saw everybody adopting content, you know, trying to be a little bit more selective and a little bit more strategy about getting their market out there and and and using sort of the way that B tob bars of have changed really how they like to find suppliers and adopting an inband marketing strategy. Gotta and so what have you seen from the buyers perspective? Has that buyer behavior changed as inbound marketing has continue to evolve? Well, here's the thing. So, like any betb buyer has a incredible encyclopedia, as much information about any supplier or any product as they need to find right, true through their browser, Yep, and true search engine. Right. So I guess gone of the days where BTB buyers need to tolerate sales people or need to hear the pitch as much as they used to write, because they figure out if this is something that's good for me, I'm going to educate myself and I'm going to pull myself out almost through that...

...that process of awareness. I guess the challenge is, and I guess this is something we I think we do very well in our organization. Product to market is that, certainly within certain markets and BETB, you know, buyers may not perceive that they have a need for a new solution. So you're dealing and you know what we deal the tech markets, certainly on the enterprise level. You know, most organizations have some adequate solution and we've got customers who are trying to disrupt what's already in place. And the challenge is, how do we get you know, how do you get mine share? How do we build awareness? How do we get interest with with decision makers who think they're okay right. So you know, that's where we sort of you know, as we were talking offline, how you know, my feeling about in bound marketing. I mean it's absolutely appropriate to use content to drive interest. But where we see that does settle now? Where everything used to be inbound marketing, now in bound marketing is, you know, I suppose it's finding it's rightful place in the piece of the Pie. Well, we see more and more tech organizations actually building up their sales development team and their outreach and now to get up markets that you know, may may be harder to disrupt into or where the buyers may not be in search mode. So look, if you've got a box and he's in discovery mode, he's in research mode. You know you want him to find your content and pull himself into your funnel and inbound marketing is absolutely the best route. But if you're looking in a market that's, you know, pretty established and you know and there's you know, there's already an investment and made, you know, those buyers tend not to be in research mode. So that's where it's a little bit harder to catch their interest. Got It, and so talk to us about that. This blended approach then, kind of mixing the inbound approach with the cells development model, of with the with the clients that you're working with and what are you seeing that's working the best? Yeah, great, great question. So I think modern outreach or sales development should be done with the same...

...core principles as in bound marketing. And, if he's a still inbound marketing to what it is at its core and my personal opinion, it's really about getting the appropriate content to the eyes and ears of the decisionmakers you're trying to reach. So gone are the days of, you know, buying a list and cold calling, as it used to be done, and pitching, you know, a hundred times a day to get one into into interested kind of prospect. I think the thing to do is to try and, you know, identify betb bars and make sure that you can try and get them to opt into good content. And I think it's a little bit of a longer tail process, you know, using content in an outbound format. And but what you want to do is when the decisionmaker needs to find a solution, that you've already had some touch point, that you're on the radar in some way, and I think designing content for that different persona. So it might be the same decision maker, but you know how the conversation starts as a little bit different. When we talk about sort of a an inbound persona versus an outbound persona. Well, usually the outbound persona doesn't need as much information. He hasn't fully or he she hasn't fully decided that they're interested yet. So you're really trying to whet the appetites. Gotta have you found that there's any particular type of messaging, Anthony, that resonates with a BAB buyer? As you're you know you're you're using this blended approach. You're going outbound as well as as well as doing inbound. But with the outbound messaging, I just get an enormous amount of emails in my inbox every day that are not relevant at all to me. It seems like there's zero personalization. It just it reeks of this is an email that is being sent to thousands of people. So, from your perspective, since you guys are living and breathing this all day every day, what would you say? Are some some things that are listeners could implement that would have separate them from that noise that I'm sure you are seeing as well in your a box? Totally, totally and I...

...still get it. And you know, there's some interesting trends now where, you know, I might even today I was just cleaning up my inbox and there seems to be a new trend now where and unsolicited email might get sent out and then a couple days later you'll get another unsolicit email saying hey, I don't know if you had a chance to respond to this yet, and then you get this other email that says, oh, you know, before I kind of take you off my list, I was going to give you one more opportunity to see if you wanted to have a conversation. And I'm thinking, Wow, I didn't even opt into anything appy. I think it's almost like the cable guy is at the door here. You know that sound were you know? Yeah, so, so it's a wonderful question and I get asked at all the time. So how do we not spam people? But yet we still want to make a good introduction and our rule here in product to market is it's got to be sort of a countbased marketing. So we need a credible reason to reach out to somebody, to introduce yourselves, to introduce a product or service and hey, you know what, it's not just because we want to do it, we need to find what the win is, what the upside, you know, what's relevant, you know, from an industry point of view or a company point of view. So we're very big into designing campaigns that kind of use a Bachelmant, metadology or certainly a reason to make it seem like it's a person to person contact. And we do not like to make it look in fact we won't run it. We even if a customer demanded that, we wouldn't runt it, you know, just a sort of generic oh well, you're a Betb by or your you work in it, so we want to hit you up with this. A lot of it. And so is the research done at the persona level or is or is research done at the individual level to ensure that the person on the receiving end of it doesn't feel like they're just getting the same email as everybody else? Totally? So, I mean we would look to do it on the personal level. Sometimes, you you know, for scale you may have to look at the persona level. But even at that we want to make sure that our guys are understanding, you know, the organization that they're reaching out to spend a bit of time to see if there's anything in the press and media about that organization so we can we can basically leverage any that's topical and relevant to our you know, the people that were targeting.

So they don't say hey, well, this is just a generic email and you know I'm on a list with a thousand of the people today. You know what I mean? Yeah, and you would alluded earlier about kind of the follow up and getting those emails, you know, those nine part email sequences where you never opted in the first place and you keep getting followed up with. You know, I understand the power and follow up and a lot of you, even when I'm reaching out to get folks to be a guest on our show after, you know, we follow up, you know, twice after the initial email, just because people are busy and you know, you understand that things get missed and people manage their inbox definitely and if they don't see you one day, there's a good chance and never going to go back and see it. So where do you stand on kind of when it comes to outbound what is your kind of rule for follow up? A great question. Sometimes that's, you know, client to client specific or even indeed, campaign to campaign specific you know, we would like to see some sort of signal, you know, of interest before we like we would we would have a reach out, we might have one follow up piece, but if we don't see anything in the analytics or any sort of engagement, I don't necessarily believe in sending it the you know, the other seven emails, which alls feed themselves. So I think you're looking for signals. So some indicators would be, you know, open rates, forward grades. We have a we have a tool here that we use here in product to market that gives us some analytics about how our campaigns are running. We're looking for hand raisers. We really want to make sure that we're mindful of people's time and that we want to you know, even from us from a sales development rep point of view. You know, part of the thing about being a successful sales aboutment rep is that your guarded with your time right. So you got to move on and you should move on. I absolutely totally take the point that follow up is important, you know, but I don't know if follow up to you drop, as the old saying goes, to people who aren't, you know, responsive, is is is the best out yeah, I totally agree, Anthony. This has been, in you know, incredibly insightful. It's been super helpful for me. I want to close by asking a question...

...that I've been asking for the last few weeks that I've really loved hearing the responses for, and it's a question about legacy. What would you say, Anthony, is the legacy that you want to leave? That's it's just such an interesting question. James. I know I'm forty years old, so I think this is the first time I've ever been asked what I would like my legacy to be. I guess one cool thing about our organization product to market and indeed, anyone who's looking for talent, you know, sales development seems to be kind of the first step for many on in the sales career, and I honestly say that over the last six or seven years we've hired some amazing people and I think, you know, what we'd like to be known for is, you know, getting people started within their sales careers. So a cool thing about an organization like ours is you can really see how people you know, where their trajectory goes beyond leaving our organization, and I can say that we've got some wonderful people who are now out in industry. They work in Google, Linkedin, you know, they work in Zend as, they work in Nitrol, really wonderful organizations, and I think them serving their time and our organization and learning the skills and doing the hard work and the hard yards, as we say here, has really helped them leveraged into some great roles within some great organizations, and I'm we're actually a tone proud of that here. I love it, Anthony. If there's somebody listening to this they want to stay connected with you or they want to learn more about product to market, what's the best way for them to go about doing that? I would love to connect with all your all your listeners, for sure. So I am I'm Anthony Eburn and if it's okay, I might spell that for you because people sometimes it's spelt like Mr Burne from the instants, but am or Mr Friends from the Sinstance, put it's so it's at Antiho, N Y E B Y or any and that's my handle on Instagram, on on twitter, on facebook. I have my own my own blog, which is Anthony Burncom, Anthony Eburncom as well. So I'd love to connect with everybody. I love it. Anthony, thank you so much for your time...

...today. This has been fantastics. I really appreciate it. My pleasure. James, hopefully speak you again soon. If you're a BETB marketer, we want to feature you on sites like the Huffington post social media examiner in chief marketer. Every week we send that a question related to be to be marketing. We use the responses to those questions to feel the content we write for really popular websites. So head over to sweet fish mediacoma questions and sign up today. Thank you so much for listening. Until next done.

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