593: How the Modern Marketer Has Become a Data Doctor w/ Vijay Kasireddy

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Vijay Kasireddy, Co-Founder and CEO at Fiind.

Fiind: https://fiind.com/

Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fiind-inc/

Tweet: https://twitter.com/fiindinsights

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fiindinsights

Looking for a guaranteed way to createcontent that resonates with your audience? Start a podcast, interview your ideal clientsand let them choose the topic of the interview, because if your ideal clientscare about the topic, there's a good chance the rest of your audience willcare about it too. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening tothe B to be growth show, podcast dedicated to helping be to be executivesachieve explosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources? You've come to the right place. I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carberry. Let's get it into the show. Welcome back to the BE TOB growthshow. Today we are joined by VJ CASSARETTI. Vj is the CO founderand CEO at Find Vja. Welcome to the show. Thanks, Jonathan,for having me. It's great to be here. It's great to have you. I'll I'll be the first to admit we ran into some technical difficulties onmy end last time that we were scheduled to have you on the show,and VJ, he was he was so marvelous about being flexible and allowing meto to rescoes with the interviews that we could work out all those technical audioglitches. So, Vja again, thank you so much. It's it reallyis going to be great to interview on the show we're going to be talkingtoday. I Love I love today's topic. We're going be talking about how themodern mark or has become a data doctor, which I think is verycompelling topic. But of course, before we get into today's topic, maybeyou can tell us a little about what you and the find team or upto these days. Yeah, absolutely, Jonathan. So, in fact,someone recently reached out to me with a message that ran something like this.You know, hey, congrats on your growth. Looks like you're looking forpeople, hiding for people. We got this unique solution that you want totry, and I was like, you know, who wouldn't like some help, especially when you need it, and...

...it's free to try out. Sothis person who reached out to me, she noticed that we're hiring, we'reexpanding or launching, etc. Etc. And that these activities, which wecall them signals, indicate a need and reached out to me at the righttime and it what. So I imagine you can understand your potential customer needs, figured out who needs help and reach out to them with a message thataddresses their needs. Better conversions and more customers, right. H so that'swhy I find this building a signal store, using artificial intelligence to help marketing andsales teams find their customers, whether it's new up cell or cross cellopportunities. HMM. Yeah, well, and certainly, and so, youknow, finding buying the right customers at the at the right time and approachingwith with the right message. You know. I mean, who couldn't use alittle bit more of that in their business? So obviously, so you, you in the fine team are doing some fantastic things and I think thathelps to to lay a little bit of groundwork about today's topic. You know, what we're really talking about how the modern marketer has actually become a datadoctor. So, you know, VJ, tell me a little about this,this metaphor, about this analogy. What are we kind of talking abouttoday? Yeah, absolutely, Jonathan. So you know, if you allthink about it right, you know, a doctor diagnosis first and then prescribesmedicine next. So if I have called, the doctor learns about my symptoms,such as you know, what's my temperature, what's my blood pressure?You know, do I have pain somewhere, etc? Before matching the right medicineor right treatment with my symptoms. So, if you think about it, a marketer is really no different. Learns about the customer needs and matcheswith the right solution and a message. The better the needs are understood,the more effective the messages, needing to improved conversions. So all of this, from a conceptual standpoint, is not really new. But what is newis that a lot of the data that wasn't available previously is available now,which means that marketers can now access and...

...act on the millions of you know, this customer signal data. One of the questions that I often get,Jonathan, is you know, what do you mean by signal? So signalsare activities from people that indicate their potential needs and buying intent. So examplescould be putting out an RFP out there, you know, how riding for people, modernizing systems. That are processes risk of cyber security, you knowwhich a lot of people have been talking about it recently, and they canbe millions of signals, depending on product, service, industry, etc. Sothis signal data can be used to determine the right customer profile that informsUS WHO's likely to buy your products and services and, more importantly, why. So in many ways more than marketers are becoming part data doctors. Yeah, I think I've even I've said it on the on the show before,is that, you know, we have this sort of unbelievable access to todata, data points. It's just there's so much data to be had andto use and it's and it can be overwhelming and it's you know, it'sbecause it's this idea of okay, you know what data is most important,what do you track, how do you use it? And it has becomethis incredibly complicated sort of landscape to navigate. And so I almost feel like thethe doctor analogy is even more appropriate because you know, when you whenyou think, oh ahead, you know, doctors go through all this schooling andhow much the you know they have to the keep track of and theeducation and everything that goes into it. It's such an incredibly important and complicatedjob and process. And so for modern marketers, obviously this is this isa an analogy, but it is, you know, there is more complicatedthan it ever has been. For so it requires an additional level of thoughts, of Finesse. So, and you...

...know, again, another reason whywe're excited to have you on the show and talk about this now. Wedo have a few key takeaways as we're talking about how that data holds thekeys to understanding the customers and their needs. So, VJ, let's talk aboutthen. You know, in your estimation, what is the core functionof marketing? Yeah, so, if I think about it, I havenever seen a market get into trouble for successfully creating a lot of customer interestand investment, and those who do it again and again sort of become replaceablein their organizations. So I think about the essential function of marketing is toreally create customers from interest to investment, again and again. And all theactivities that that we think about, you know, be it the creating content, campaign creation, building communities or brand development, digital transformation, so allof this really support those outcomes of the essential function of marketing, you know, creating customers from interesting investment. And when you say investment, you knowbecause you know, maybe maybe the lines have been blurred a bit between salesand marketing these days, especially, you know, if you're into ABM andright and you align your teams. When you talk about investment on the marketingside, I mean are you talking about, you know, a financial investment andemotional investment or just a personal investment that you know? Now we canstart talking about an actual sale. Yeah, so that there are two part strait. So there is both the emotional investment, getting the customer emotionally interestedin your brand, in your product and service, but also getting the financialinvestment, getting the customer to sign the check. But of course, youknow, sales would come into play in there and the role of a marketerwould become sales enablement. You know, once, once the engagement, youknow, with the sales teams actually starts. So be the ABM, be providingan effective content and continuing that path...

...from the interest where there is alot more involvement from a marketing standpoint, but as you go through the finalstep of getting the customer to actually getting to write the check or invest.So there's obviously a lot of opportunity for marketer to help the sales as wellas the customer to actually buy in. Hmm, Yep, absolutely. Okay. So another takeaway that we're going to be touching on is this idea that, you know, the understanding the customer. So we've touched on it a littlebit in terms of we've got all of this data, but what doesit really take to then understand your customer? Yeah, so to create the customerinterest and investment and keep them and, of course, sets by them,you would want to understand who your customers are, both new and existing. Not only who they are, but what their needs are. Why didthe invest in all of those questions that are important to be able to targetthe right customers. So this requires a customer three hundred and sixty data.So if you were to think of the customer data as a brain, itwould have two parts, the left brain and the right brain, so tospeak. So one part is typically distributed across all your internal systems, suchas your pcrm, marketing, etc. Where the data tends to be mostlystructured and is like the left brain, and another part of the data livesexternally, where you know it's mostly unstructured and it's like the right brain.We want both that, the left and the right brains, come together fora two, three hundred and Sixty d review to best understand your customer needsand intent. So let me give an example. When the marketing team lookedat the internal data of a media company, all of the customer attributes looked sosimilar that the team struggle to come up with meaningful set of segments toinvest in. And so that's when, so to speak, we brought theright brain in and added external data, external signals, such as how maturetheir digital marketing is, whether the potential...

...customers are Seo optimized, how warderntheir marketing technology stack is, etc. A clearer picture emerged, and whatwe noticed is that companies that were digitally mature and technology savvy in certain industriesrepresented the just opportunities and as a result of which the opportunities went up bytenfold. And so the question to ask really for marketers is do you haveaccess to all the data, internal and the external, the left under rightbrains, to be able to understand the customer needs and to plan effectively?This is great. We're not we're not only asking our listeners to become datadoctors, we're asking them to become data brain surgeons. I feel like atthis point, next level we're talking about here, but it makes a lotof sense, and so you're understanding the customer what are I mean? Andyou have then a couple different, several different dimensions to the data. Let'slet's talk about that. So, just like a doctor, how he orshe would use all the tools to be able to get the list of allthe symptoms and all the data about the patients. So, similar to that, once you have access to all the data, you have a customer sixto view. Then you want to be able to diagnose and you want tobe able to answer questions such as WHO's likely to buy and why, andwhen and how should I reach out to them? And the answers to thisquestions really in a lie, in three dimensions. So that is that iswhat we call the fit. We call the intent and the timing. Soif you think about the fit, it's really about similar customers, similar successfulcustomers from the historical data, based on the internal data, such as thepomographics and demographics, etc. The intent is about the readiness to buy,so this is based on all the external...

...data, such as certain actions,such as leadership, change or hiding, or changes in technology, and soon and so forth. And finally, the timing gives us an idea onwhether the customer is looking to make a decision this week or this month orthis quarter, and really the interplay between these three dimensions can help prioritize yourmarketing investments, for example, accounts that have, you know, high fitand high intent. Probably you want to invest majority of your budgets for multitouchcampaigns, you know, from call downs to social campaigns, to email,what have you. And then one of the interesting things about this is onceyou have the customer three six to view, once you have all these dimensions,any opportunity that you have in the pipeline or somebody visiting your website,you could also flow them through this engine and rank them real time for betterprioritization. Vja Is in and obviously you said that all three of these dimensionsthere's there's overlap and interplay. Of course there is. It sounds a littlebit like the the intent, though, is incredibly linked to the timing.And terms of the intent, you said that there are certain markers, youknow, if there's a growth or leadership change or whatever it is. Imean, is it is that of one to one sort of correlation with thetiming or there is still definitely some some nuance there between the two. Yeah, there's certainly a lot of new ones actually. So that is the timingsometimes can be very direct. So when you see an RFP out there,so clearly people are have certain time timelines and mindstones, whether a lot ofother signals where the timing is not very clear or it maybe a subtle indicationof timing. And so that's where the ability to really bring in multiple dataand triangulate the different, different data to be able to arrive at the timingis actually an important skill to have as...

...well. And and so that's wherethe diagnosis becomes important, and the more data that you have, the easierit becomes to be able to call out the timing. HMM. And speakingof, you know, gathering more and more data this, this fourth takeawayis about continuous improvement. Tell us a little about what you mean by continuousimprovement and what that means for your company. So there is a there's a famouslegend about the origin of chess. That's that's my favorite story. Thatgoes something like this, and I think many of your listeners might have heardabout this. When the inventor of the game short it to the emperor,the emperor was so impressed by that he asked the man to name the reward. The man apparently said, give me one grain of rice for the FirstSquire of the chess board, two grains for the next square, for forthe next, eight for next and so on for all sixty four squares,with each square obviously having double the number of grains as the squire before.The emperor agreed that amazed that the man had asked for such a small reward, so he thought. After a week that treasurer came back and informed thatthe reward would have add up to an astronomical sum, for greater than allthe rice in the entire kingdom. And so if you were to apply thesame analogy to business or marketing, if the conversions improved six percent every month, month after month, they would double in the year. So the ideais to have a continuous learning system in place that takes the feedback and constantlyimproving the data and the models to be able to go back and and improvethe conversions in this particular case. So such a system would act like compounding. And I want to give one example. To expect technology company that we're workingwith was looking at some of the signals, such as apex versus Capex, which is important to determine if a company is looking to cloud solutions versuson premise, things like modern workplace hiding...

...for IOT products in ECCP exers.There were lots and lots of signals. So this company was able to increasetheir lead to opportunity versions by well with three X, by two times,in just three cycles by having such a continuous learning system in place where,after every day you would learn about not just what is working well, butwhat is also not working well and how do you tweak the more than whatare some of the other signals that you would need to get to be ableto improve the conversions? M Yeah, yeah, you know, Vja,I studied economics in in Undergrad and I sort of remember, sort of rememberthat stadsht or. It always, it always tickles me and it's a greatyou know, it's a great example. It's very it's it's a very powerfulexample to show, you know, the power of compound interest and and thatis, you know, some people think about that, of course when you'retalking about financial planning, but a but of course it can apply to somethingeven within your own business. So I think that's a great example. Media. If you know, for the people listening right now. If what wouldmaybe be a suggestion? You have some maybe next best steps if they themselvesare looking to sort of become more proficient data doctors themselves when it comes tomarketing? Do you have a I mean you have a couple of things thatthey that they can take back to their company and start thinking about or implementingtoday after this episode? Yeah, absolutely, Jonathan. So the benefits of continuouslearning is, you know what time looks magical but but to real soa couple of questions that we ask ourselves internally as we are using our owntools and as we are trying to grow just like any other business, andsome of the questions that we ask, or customers as well, they reallyt that that are the important the first one is, do you have acontinuous learning engine in place, so the...

...optimization, whether it's the marketing optimization, whether you're running a campaign or whatever activity that you're trying to perform,is always on and not a onetime thing. And if you have to achieve thebenefits of the continuous learning engine, then the second question is, oryou leveraging all the data and the tools? Do you have access to all theall the data and do you have the right tools to be able tomake sense out of it and ask the types of the questions that you're tryingto ask? And then, finally, one of the one of the painpoints that we commonly encounter as people are looking to deploy a continuous learning engineand leveraging the data and the tools is the data quality, and so that'ssometimes overlooked and sometimes what happens is when you have a lot of data andthat doesn't look good, it tends to discourage people. So I think it'simportant to have the right quality systems in place to make sure that all thedata that you're looking at is actually highly accurate and make sense for you toapply all the tools that you have and to feed in into the continuous learningengine in place perfect well, Vji, think these were some tremendous takeaways,some great first steps for our listeners. I always love being able to leavethem with some sort of actionable piece of advice at the end of the episode. So you just you knocked it out of the park with that J ifany of our listeners are interested in following up with you, they want to, they want to find out more about today's topic. They want to findout more about about you and find you know, what's the best way forthem to go about doing that? Yeah, so we can bid reached at WWWCOM. That's two ICE FII and the there's a lot more resources and toolsand a lot of content are there that you can check out and I'd welcomeany questions, any quaits. I can be reached at Vja, at Tincom, VI Jay at Fi and dcom and...

Jonathan, it's a pleasure to behere. Well, thank you so much, Vj. As a pleasure having youon the show. Thank you so much for your time today. Thankyou, and thanks to all the listeners. If you've been getting valued from thispodcast, even help us reach more people by reviewing the show on itunes. Here's how you can leave a review in less than a minute. Openyour podcast APP and tap the surge icon and the bottom right corner. TYPEIN B tob growth, then select our show. Once you're there, tapthe reviews tab and tell us what you think of the show. These reviewshelp us out of time. Thank you so much for listening. Until nexttime,.

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