581: How This Entrepreneur Grew a Community of Over 50k People on LinkedIn w/ Swish Goswami

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Swish Goswami, Co-Founder & COO at Dunk.

Wouldn't it be nice to have several thought leaders in your industry know and Love Your brand? Start a podcast, invite your industries thought leaders to be guests on your show and start reaping the benefits of having a network full of industry influencers? Learn more at sweetish MEDIACOM. You're listening to the B tob growth show, podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources? You've come to the right place. I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carberry. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the B tob growth show. We are here today with Swish Gaswanni. He is the CO founder and COO at Dunk. Swish, are you doing today? Man, doing well. Thank you for having me. Really appreciate it, I am. I'm really excited to chat with you, Swish. I've been following you on Linkedin for a while now. I love the content you're putting out. It's inspiring tons of people. You've...

...grown quite a following there. We're going to be talking about building a community on Linkedin, which is something you've done an exceptional job of these last probably close to a year now, from from what I can tell. But before we get into that Swish, just tell us a little bit about your background and what you're up to now at dunk. Yeah, so born in Singapore, grew up pretty much as an entrepreneur to started a number of businesses when I was younger, ranging from a huppercrupt business that I sold for two hundred dollars and able to find. Attended when like nine years old, non prop high school, and then kind of moved into the space of wearables, which is how I came to New York. There a license my product out which Trevor Booker, with the Brooklyn Nets player, started dabbling into the basketball space, Meta guy called Elliot Robinson, and we decided to come together and take our media network of ten million followers, heavily focused on basketball, and put that together and really make it into a media company. So that's what I'm currently working on. But I kind of carved out a little multi hypnic career...

...for myself at the age of twenty, which is like se game, doing a lot of linked in and at the same time also working part time for Trevor and adventure capital firm sourcing deal. So been a really busy time, but at the same time I'm really excited to be on and really excited to share anything I can. I love it. I love it. You have. You have done an exceptional job, Mane, of taking the the digital community that you've built online on Linkedin and turning it into real kind of facetoface relationships. From what I can tell from all the all the meet ups, at Your meetups, at you're hosting your seems like you're all over the place. Talk to us about how you think about and the building a community on Linkedin at a high level, Swiss, and then we'll get into some tactics. Yeah, I mean a very high level. It's always being about focusing on community and people and trying as much as possible to be able to help them in every way possible. So when I started out on Linkedin, I wrote a number of ways I wanted to be able to help people on Din and those ranged from getting on five minute calls with people who were struggling in...

...life or didn't know what they wanted to do or university students that needed to help, to getting like thirty minute consulting calls and on how they can grow their linkedin brand, to connecting people to one another if they ever needed a connection, to now, of course, host posting meet up so people can meet their all on connections in person. So it's always being about people first. It's always been about community and, more than anything, it's being about engagement. Every single one of my posts I try to look at every comment I get. I'm terrible a looking at my inbox, but if you send me a common chance in Bard that ninety five percent of the time I will respond to your comment. I love it. I love it. And so let's get into some of the some of the Tactic Swish as you've been building your community, your I think I just looked and I think you've got fifty four over fifty four thero followers on Linkedin. Now. What are some of the tactics that that helped you build the community that you've built? Yeah, so three things. mainly. One is content. I started five range of...

...content ranging from informative content, things I was interested about, things I felt that I could speak on. The second word inspirational piece of the content. So quotes and stories of people that are inspiring, people I might know or might not know. And the first personal anecdotes. I think that's kind of my speciality, which is taking my life and putting it into its and share in my experiences and being very open to hearing other people and engaging with that. The second big aspect of, you know, really being able to get traction on Linkedin is collaboration. So early on I started to scout out the people who were crushing it on Linkedin. Many of them are my friends now, like Kila Alexis, for example, Josh Spector, Alan Gannett, all these people, I scouted them out, put them into group. We started collaborating on a lot of pieces of content, we started sharing each other's post really trying to cross pollinate their audiences. And the final thing came down again, as I said, to community right, the emphasis on building a community and not trying to monetize people early but instead trying to be able to get people in feel included and put out and amplified positivity as much as possible.

I love it. I love it Swish and as you're doing a lot of your talking to a lot of people at these in person meetups and you're engaging with a ton of people. What are some of the things that you see people doing that that you definitely wish they weren't doing? What are some things that people should stay away from? I mean, of course it's two things. I mean the first of all is like monetization. I mean there's so many people that are getting to like six thousand followers or four thousand and are immediately claiming to be experts at Linkedin, are trying to sell courses, are trying to sell books, are trying to go budget monetizing their following off the bad which, you know, look, I am no one to say anything. I'm not the God of Linkedin, I do not control or own Linkedin, but you know, when it comes down today, if you want to build a mark on Linkedin, if you want to be able to build a brand on Linkedin, monetizing that early on on is incredibly risky and challenging. The second big thing I think that I'm seeing, which is the problem when...

...it comes specifically to building a community, is people being way too guarded, and what I mean by that is people not willing to share their personal life. And what I really mean by that is not sharing a selfie with your dog, but I mean literally eighty percent of our lives are consumed by work and to have an outlet, to be able to talk about what went right, but, more importantly, what went wrong, is incredibly important and I've seen so much growth just as a person by being able to do that. So I would highly encourage people to share their failures, because those are a lot more important than sharing your success, and especially as an entrepreneur. Entrepreneurship is the field where failures are not talked about enough. Yeah, and you know, one example that I saw from you, I think it was your post yesterday, maybe it was a couple days ago, you talked about some hate mail that you that you had received be a linkedin that basically said you know, you're too young. What do you know? Stop spewing this garbage on Linkedin. You don't know anything, you're too young, and you basically...

...told you know, told that story in a way to say you know. It makes me sad that there are people out there that will do that and those kind of messages will actually derail people from sharing their voice, sharing their experience, sharing what they're learning, how they're growing on the platform because of the one or two haters out there that obviously have so much brokenness inside of them that they're spewing it out on on other people. Can you share some other examples, switch because I think that's a really valuable point that you made of thinking about your content, going a little bit deeper below the surface, talking about things that are that are really struggling. Are there any other types of post other than the one I just mentioned that have tended to resonate really well with your audience? Yeah, yeah, for sure, sure about that. There's two things in particular. One is, of course, that post that I made, which was actually, like you, literally twelve hours ago, I think. It was like something that I woke up to in the morning at five am and I saw this message and I was like, oh,...

...that's suck and I just decided to post about it. That's what you do at five am. And beyond anything else, I mean, we did literally about failures that I've had in building a business, sometimes breaching confidentiality. I talked about that about four months ago. I've talked about things like going up to someone and not being taken seriously in a board meeting and talking about how those starting to harm people in the relationships that they have on linkedin particularly so I think I've gone through a wide spectrum of anecdotes and I'm not afraid to keep going. The only thing is I continuously want to bridge the gap between my personal life and my professional life. Right I'm never going to share something like I'm getting married, like I might share it if it has something to do with my career, of course, but I'm not going to make it my facebook. But at the same time I don't want it to be that people feel restricted, that they can't talk about anything's happening in the professional life or linked to their personal life on Linkedin. Yeah, one of my highest performing pieces of content on Linkedin was supposed to talked about my dad leaving when I was two years old and what that taught me. By being raised,...

...you know, by my mom and my grandma being around such supportive people, it kind of set this bar of support, and so now I find myself surrounded by incredibly supportive people, but when I really think about it, it's because I sought out those relationships, because it was what I expected because of how I was raised. And so, you know, using that experience of not not growing up with the DAD, but but looking at the positive and instead of looking at that situation as a negative and the tie to how often we look at our careers in a negative way instead of looking at it from kind of the positive angle. So I think they're just I've been learning from guys like you and Alan Gannett and Josh and and Mikaela, and you guys are just doing a phenomenal job with the content that you're creating there. If somebody's listening to this right now, Swish and they want to stay connected with you, obviously they can. They can follow you on Linkedin. Are there any other ways that that folks can stay connected with you? De Definitely. Um, so you can go to at go swish, which is at...

...geoswish. I promise it's not narcissistic to my last mommy. So I mixed my last name in my in my nickname swish. But to add go swish on twitter, instagram or snapchat. Reach out to me. I'm always happy to come on a five minute call. I even talked about that once, where I feel like people underestimate the impact that a five minute call and make in their life. So always trying to look for the next opportunity and hopefully that'll be a person to listening. I love it. I love it and switch my last question. What is the legacy that you want to leave? I think the legacy that I probably want to leave is one that when when I die, it would be like this person lived not only to Max and to his potential, but lived probably the most transparent, open and honest life to people. I never want to lose my genuine touch that I have with people and I never want to reach a point where I feel like I'm being clouded or I'm not being able to reach people in an authentic way. So, if anything, that I want to be known for its authenticity and being...

...genuine. I love it. I love it. Swich, this has been fantastic. He delivered some quite a few value bombs here, so I really appreciate it and thank you again so much for your time or thanksprapping me. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the B Tob Growth Show, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player. This guarantees that every episode will get delivered directly to your device. If you or someone you know would be an incredible guest for the B tob growth show, email me at Jonathan at Sweet Fish Mediacom let us know we love connecting with be to be executives and we love sharing their wisdom and perspective with our audience. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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