580: Getting Started with Website Personalization: 3 Things You Need to Know w/ Amy Larsen

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Amy Larsen, Director of Demand Generation at Siemens.

This episode is brought to you bybound. What if your website responded to your audience better than your best salesrep? Bound helps marketers engage at scale. Learn more at bound. Three hundredand Sixtycom you're listening to the BAB growth show, a podcast dedicated tohelping be tob executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategiesor tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberryand I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to theBB growth show. We are here today with Amy Larsen. She's the directorof demand generation at Siemens. Amy, how you doing today? Doing Great, James. How are you? I am a wonderful amy. We're goingto be talking about personalization today and really wanting to dive in to the seamensstory and your experience with personalization at Siemens, but before we do that, justgive our listeners a little bit of context. What are you and yourteam up to at Siemens? What is what is Siemens and what are youand your team doing over there? At the very broad question of Seamens isa German based company. We focus primarily on the industrial market, manufacturing,energy, healthcare, that kind of base for us. Our demand generation team, we provide demand generation support for all of our divisions here in the US. Base, okay, and so we are focusing on helping them to activateat scale demand generation programs across the multitude of divisions and Business Unit to alot of internal customers. Being that broad and that many markets, wonderful.All right, amy. So, so now our listeners have a little bitof context where you're coming from. Let's start talking about when did this ideaof personalization? Has this been something you...

...guys have been doing for several yearsnow? Take go back to the kind of the beginning of the personalization journey. Will kind of start there. Could you walk us through a win theconversation started happening? Sure so. I think personal and station came up forus around two thousand and thirteen. Two Thousand and fourteen, we were buildinga new team focused around demand generation, which was kind of a new conceptfor seamen. We had a grouping of like minded individual across all of ourorganizations who are working on technology. How do we move our technology space forwards, bring our businesses forward? To make use of more of the digital space. Serving manufacturers. We tend to be in a lagging market, so thethe new shiny object isn't always the key on how you reach them. Buttheir buyers journey had definitely evolved to be more and more in the digital space. We have younger engineers that are coming in that are part of the purchasedecisions. But the biggest thing for us was to be able to take whatwas a very small group of people who were digitally focused and enable our businessesto operate at scale. So all of these divisions we just have a handfulof people. How do we make it so that we can latch these typesof programs without having large departments of people? And so the idea came in fromone of our team members to start looking at using personalization as a wayto not have to build large, complex programs that take programs that were existingand make them more personalized. We've certainly heard all the staffs about conversion ratesand we were trying to drive those up. So that was how we started inthat path. And and then so someone brings up the idea, hey, we should start looking into this. What were some of the solutions youguys looked at, what were some of the things that stood out that ultimatelymade you guys end up, you know, deciding to go with the vendor thatyou chose, and that's a really good question. So, you know, for us it was twofold one, you know, being able to lookfor technology partners who could operate within the...

...scheme of space, which isn't alwayseasy, to having some younger team members where we wanted to excite them withsomething that was new technology based. We've been customers of serious to studies fora while, so we turned to them for some help to evaluate a coupleof vendors. We went through several scenarios. The biggest thing for us was somethingthat could implement with our current analytics, web analytics program our current market beingautomation system, and that would allow us to integrate without any it involvement. Going through it with US can can be challenging at times, and sowe had a couple of interviews and we landed on working with bound was getsmart content. At the time they had the capabilities of being able to dothat. But the other area that was very helpful for us, with beinga small team, we didn't really have execution resources in house. We weren'tgoing to have a lot of people that we could devote to it, andso our concern was we're going to get this new tool and we won't havethe resources to be able to implement it, and so they offered a consulting packagewhere they helped us with actually executing the program so the one thing wetold them we decided to go on board, was we really need a partner,somebody who can help us make sure that these things get done, becauseit may not happen if it's relying on our own internal resources and work clothes. And so I would imagine there was there was probably a lot of collaborationas far as developing of the the over arching strategy. What you guys whatresults you guys wanted to drive with it, and then bound came along and andreally helped you guys execute on the strategy that you guys collaboratively came upwith together. Is that how it worked? It did. We learned a lotabout ourselves going through this journey. I think every marketer experience is thatwhen you get a new tool and then you start trying to execute it,you start to identify you thought you had a workflow or a process or aresource allocated to do this, but they...

...have another job. Yeah, butit allocated elsewhere, and so kind of going forward with that. But theyhelped us with filling that resource piece. And then we had to kind oflook at our work clothes internally, which there was a little bit of someonebox on art and getting used to that. And what bounded was they really helpedus to analyze some of the gaps we might have had in our strategy, and by that I mean looking at how are we defining our audience andhow are we defining our targeting, how are we defining our go to marketstrategy? The one thing that that came out of that was becoming very clearon what we defined as an audience and how were we going to internally targetthat audience. And then personalization is something that helps you to activate that alongwith everything else that's in your plan. So it made it kind of afunnel to push everything through, and that was a big learning step for usand that that's been extremely valuable. So so are you? Are you ableto share a me how you guys thought about your audience before and then kindof what that ended up shifting into as you guys started working with bound yeah, absolutely. The biggest thing for us was, you know, we wouldtalk about our audiences being CFOs, engineers, marketing or the manufacturing operations, plantmanagers, things like that, and what we learned was that that's toobroad to create personalization that's effective and that actually highlighted it caused issues in otherareas, not just in our targeting on our website, but when we're writingcontent specifically. So we started to learn to look at what is the goto market strategies. Is Common, you know, within Siemens. For usit's industry. So you're talking to somebody that's an automotive will food and beveragein engineer. It can have different needs and pain points than an automotive engineer. So they may be looking at similar solutions, but they're solving different problems. And so it allowed us to look at making our audiences and segmenting itby the market that they were in, the industry that they were in,and then that's how we started to bucket...

...our personalization. Leaving it simple wasvery helpful, not going, you know, much beyond the industry, because itallows you to make sure you're producing and getting something out the door,versus if you're really going into finite persona segments and getting into something more complicated. So our other big learning with Cuba, simple and amy. So so boundcame alongside you, guys. They helped kind of expose some some partsof your process that that needed to be worked on. Gave you this newmindset around the importance of segmenting your audience. Is probably a little bit more granularlythan you were doing it before. I'd love to talk about some ofthe results that you guys have seen, you know, since then, sincebound came alongside, they helped you implement it. What has been the storysince then? Sure absolutely be. The one thing that came out of workingwith bound and personalization was the idea of creating a goal. When we firststarted working with us, they would ask us, you know, what's thegoal, what you want this person to achieve? On the website, werealize we could have a really good answer for that. So you got avery large website and a lot of businesses. So we started to look at maybesure we were clearly defining the goal. So when we have any type ofevent or initiative or campaign, what is it that we're looking for themto achieve, and we start off with that question now. So we startlooking at that definition. The more we have clearly defined the goal of whatwe want them to achieve, the more we're seeing that the results are drivingup. So for us we had a big automotive event. So we clearlydefine a goal. That registration was what we needed to accomplish, and sowe set personalization to the task to help us do that. We were targetingspecific companies that we wanted to be at the event in over all the industry, making sure that they were showing up, and we saw a tremendous lift inin results from that one from the...

...previous year. So seventy five percentof the registrations came from the website. From viewing personalization, we saw morethan a fifty percent left for the company that we were targeting to get tothat event and it was something that was so simple and easy to execute,clearly defining we wanted event. We want them to register with that, butjust having that in mind and having bound help us to put that package togetherin get it executed across all of our website. Getting that lift that camein was tremendous. The other thing it helped us to do is to understand, when we do have an industry and a goal in mind, what's reallyworking with each of those. So, for example, you know aerospace andautomotive, they tend to go to a certain section of our site which ismore in the general area and not the industry specific area. So now we'reable to target them to areas that we designed specifically for them, where,as you know, manufacturing prospects, they tend to go straight into the industrysite, so now we can look at making sure we're getting them to themanufacturing solutions. Those are those types of analytics and the insights they've given usover our existing website visitors. That gives us the lowhanging fruit of what goalsto define and then to help us to execute those. And they're not overwhelming, which is the hard part in our area, if things can feel sodaunting. But these are pretty simple things to put in place. You alreadymentioned it. You said it was a relatively simple question to ask, butI totally I mean they just can be so powerful. You just ask,okay, what do we want the person visiting this site to achieve, andby asking this question, it allows you to then reverse engineer that resolved.Do you feel like, by asking that question first, is it shaping,I guess, all elements of what the you know is it? Is itwhere you guys are putting the registration buttons, what the copy looks like for you, for each different audience? What were some of the questions that youguys started asking yourself when you started asking that first question of what do wewant the user on this page to achieve?...

Yeah, absolutely, I mean it'salmost embarrassing to think about now and we look at, you know,our process and what we go through for designing. It's a pretty simple question. What do you want this person to do? But it wasn't where westarted when we were doing our design process. But the more that we've asked ourselvesthat question, the more it has lent itself into becoming more customer centric, designing the experience from the perspective of the user rather than from the perspectiveof the business, and that gets us to think about it in very simpleterms. What is this person going to see? What do we want themto do and how do we want it to feel for them when they dothat? So our message is become customer centric. What is their question,their pain point, the problem they're trying to solve? How do we getthem to that information quickly and efficiently and how do we allow them to thenself serve getting that information? And so we have started to design all theelements that way, including where does the button go on an email that wesend versus where does the button go on the website that we send them to? And the other thing that's great is that it allows us to kind ofcompensate for what can be a an overwhelming navigation system a company like semens inan enterprise environment. You're talking about hunt thousands of products that they might begoing through. This allows us, for whatever location they get into, tosay, okay, we see that you're in food and beverage, you mightbe interested in seeing this or you might be interested in this content, andgetting them straight there rather than hoping that they find it in what is themass of astudent's website. The other thing that you mentioned, a me thatI that I want to go back to, is you said that there's a particularsegment of your audience, that one one segment went directly to the thepart of the website that was specifically for them, but another segment of youraudience was going to the more general, and I'm landing pages that weren't necessarilyspecific for them. So, if I'm understanding this right, you were ableto was that something you didn't know before?...

But after you guys started using bound, you started to be able to tell a people are coming to usfrom these companies and they're landing on these, you know, more generic landing pages. And with that data that you were then able to say, okay, so we're going to start putting calls to action if they come from aparticular Ip address, to point them to resources that we know are relevant tothem. Yeah, absolutely. Again, it's that lowhanging fruit aspect. Datacan be overwhelming the mass amounts that's there. So if you're trying to make senseof what is all this information in data that I'm seeing you, there'ssometimes so many numbers you don't know which one to look at. This allowsus to create some focus in the data. So we know there are key marketswhere we're trying to make gross so we focused on the data we're seeingwithin that market. And the great thing about bound is that they have actuallycome to me proactively to say here's what we're seeing with those markets that you'resaying is a key initiative for you, and then providing some in sight tosay this is the content they're already consuming. So we can ask ourselves, isthat what we want them to do as the ways that we can thenchange that experience? If that's not what wait, what we were looking forthem to accomplish to get them to the area? That is the goal.So I'm not having to solve all the world's problems, you know, acrossall of our data sites or websites. I can start to look at it'sthis audience that I need to focus on right now. Here's what we're alreadyseeing that they're going after, and then creating a specific goal and changing whatthey might have been experiencing. And we didn't know that before. I meanwe knew what companies were coming. We have ITP targeting, but knowing wherethose companies are going from there. I mean there's click stream analysis and itjust makes my head hurt. So's it makes a better story for me tobe able to rationalize and internalize just by looking at it quickly and by havingthem gave that data you know quickly, rather than hoping that I find thatin all of the numbers that I have...

...in front of me. Makes PerfectSense. Any if there's somebody, there's somebody listening to this and maybe they'reat the very beginning of kind of their personalization journey there they're starting to lookto bring it into their organization, is there any advice you would give tothat person who's on the front end of the journey with you, having havingbeen on yours for the last few years now? What is that advice ityou would give to that person? Well, that's a good question, so Iguess it would be too fold. The first is to, you know, don't underestimate, asking yourself what resources do you have that will be allocatedtowards this, because, remember, everybody already has a full time job.You're going to bring a tool in, you need to be prepared for someoneto take up the work that's going to go along with that. It's nota lot, but this workflow question still has to be answered to make surethere's a process in place that can utilize the tool. I think we wereprobably slow going at adopting personalization for that reason, having to work out ourinternal effort bound helped us to answer that question as we work with them toget us on board and moving those through. But you know, think about thatinternally to have that in place. And then the second thing would be, I guess it's threefold. The second thing would be start asking yourself whataudience would goal get us to that very simple question. What goal do Iwant them to chieve? When it's goal oriented, you'll have better use casesup front. You can hit the ground running with some test variables or pilotsthat you can implement in short terms so that you can start to see resultand then you can pivot once you get the results in place. And thatlends us to the third is keep it simple, that idea of what goaland have it be an audience and a thing and moving towards that goal sothat you can see quick iterations, because it helps for adoption when people seesick quick wins. So the more you can simplify that statement focus on thatpiece, the more you'll be able to create a bit more ground swell internallyand people start to jump on and want to use it, and that's kindof what we're seeing now. As everybody's clamoring, I want to use personalizationnow that they've seen the results that gains...

...that adoption. So think about internalwork process and think about this simple who and what goal and then, third, keep it simple. I love it, amy. This has been incredibly helpful. If there's somebody listening to this, they want to they want to stayconnected with you, they want to learn more about Siemens. What's thebest way for them to go about doing both of those things? Well,absolutely love to be able to keep in touch. The best ways to reachme is going to be either on Linkedin. I'm under Amy Larks and working forseamen's. You'll see me there, or via email, Amy Dot Larsenat Teamscom and happy to answer any questions. Amy, thank you so much foryour time today. Again, this has been incredibly helpful, so Ireally appreciate you chatting with me today. Thanks. Thanks. Great chatting withyou and best select anybody out there who's going down that personal and they shouldpast if you're a BEDB marketer, we want to feature you on sites likePuffyton Post, social media examiner and chief marketer. Every week we send outa question related to be to be marketing. We use the responses to those questionsto fuel the content we write for really popular websites. So head overto sweet fish MEDIACOM backslast questions and sign up today. Thank you so muchfor listening, until next time,.

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