577: The Power of Words: Language in a Global Context w/ Ben Baker

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Ben Baker, President of Your Brand Marketing.

Wouldn't it be nice to have severalthought leaders in your industry, Kno and love your brand start a podcast,invite your industries thought leaders to be guess on your show and startreaping the benefits of having a network full of industry. influencerslearn more at sweetfish media DOTCOM, you're. Listening to the B Tobe Grothshow podcast dedicated to helping B to B executives, achiev explosive grownwhener you're looking for techniques and strategies, tools and resources,you've come to the right place, I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carburry.Let's get it into the show. Welcome back to the BTB growth show. Weare here today with Ben Baker. He is the president of Your Brand MarketingBen, how you doing Itda anm doing just marvelous jams. Thanks for having me onthe show. I appreciate Yo jointing, US Ben we're going to be talking todayabout the power of words at language in...

...a global context, and we were talkingoffline about a story of one of your clients that you worked with and whythis topic was so powerful for that particular client. But before we getinto unfolding that story, talking about thepower of words, tell us a little bit about Youre brand marketing and whatYouuniour team are up to over there. Yeah thanks a lot I mean, we've beenaround January, will be ten years, we've been around for ten years, andthe company focuses on three things. We consult we teach and we speak on brandmessage, market vision value. So what do we do? We we work with our customersto be able to figure out what do they do? Why do they do it? Who Do they doit, for why do their customers care and help them engage them in a meaningfulway? It's it's been a fun ride. Last ten years, it's never boring. We workwith be to be clients, mostly in the mid tar and h. You know ever every dayis something different. I love it. I...

...love it so so Bhen, let's jump into thethe story that I alluded to earlier. That really is setting up this entireconversation. Take us back to that to that time and K ow what was going onwith the client before they engaged you and then and then Woll, and then willwalk through kind of the results tot happen later absolutely so most of my clients are not all F, myclints. I work on with Ha nondisclosure agreement, so I'm I can't mention names,but this was a fairly large company that did a lot of work um in Asia, inEurope and also in North America, and when they came to me h God. This isprobably five. Six seven years ago, probably closer to seven years ago now they had been working with another firmand h. They hadn't had a lot of success in in the Asian market and h. They were looking for somebodywho could help them...

...gain a foothold and to be able to be alittle bit more relevant in that marketplace, because they feltthat their product lying was something that was absolutely needed there, butthey just couldn't bring on the right distributors. They could ' bring on theright partners and they were having a lot of trouble. You know getting theirvalue statement across to that marketplace got I okay, and so they they've been trying with withanother agency weren't able to do it. Obviously they engage you guys whatkind F, as you were, Ond of assessing what they were currently doing. Itwasn't working what what did you find? Well, the first thing we noticed was:is that- and this was advice, sayin God from elsewhere. His is that everythingthat they were bringing into the Asian market wasn't English, and you know it. It wasn't that themarketplace that they were going into didn't have people that were proficientin English. It's just that it's not their first language, and we realize that you know that couldbe a bit of a barrier not as much for...

...understanding. You know the value ofthe profit project, but also as as a welcoming piece, N and Aban ability toadd trust, and we find that when you can walk into an international marketand you can speak to them in their language and in their relevance andtheir culture, things can and move quickly through theprocess, or at least a lot quicker through the process, and we found thatth. Their first challenge was everything that they had from theirpointa sale. Materials to their theire packaging to their trade show displays to their. You knowthe flyers and and pamphlets that they were hanging out and they brohe surethat they were henging out were strictly in English, and we found thatwhen they were going to you know, various trade shows that things werenot being picked up. The conversations...

...were not happening. People were notwalking into their booths and because of that, they were spending a lot ofmoney, just twiddling their thoughts, and they were Looki. They were lookingfor some different solutions. So then w? What were you guys able to implementthat that ultimately allowed them to to see successes? They were trying toenter the Asian morket yeah. Well, we focused on thei two biggest markets. One was Hong Kong and the other one wasmainland China, and we realized that Mandrin canthones were definitelythings that needed to be dealt with. They need to have some way to engagethe audience in manrinaccampnes and I'm a big believer of trade show boosts.You have a three second role: either people get what you do in the threeseconds it takes to walk from one end to your boot to the other, or theydon't and having people having to translate.Ino English and think about it was was...

...obviously creating a challenge in abarrier. So what we did is we took their value proposition and we had themtranslated. We had their broshures traveling and we had their videosoverdubbed and we had all of their materials created in such a way thatthey were either bilingual or they were trialinals in terms of being amanderdorcatneys, but at least they were speaking in the language of the peoplethat were there and you'll. There's challenges that go along with that andlet me explay that the challenges are when you're dealing with people herethat are translators. They may speak the language properly.They may understand a bit about the business, but they don't understand theregional cultural nuances. So, yes, we had everything translated here, but thebig thing that we did is we had those materials sent Chuha Kong, ShenzinBeijing, etcetera to different people that I actually knew and had them lookat the material before we had them...

...printed and had them watch the videoswith the overdob before we had, we finalize them online. The reason beingis that way you got the cultural nuancs you Ko they. They were not only yo Koscientifically correct in terms of of the language in terms of translation,but it went way beyond say the Google translate persion it went into actuallyusing the language properly within the audience that was actually Yointeracting with it. I love it and so having people that were local in that contact. Reviewing thecontent before you ever put anything out there in in these conventions andtrade chows that you were going to Wa, was there anything that that stood outthat those local people caught that you otherwise wouldn't ave, wouldn't haveseen you know somesometimes, it was, youknow, just the a turni phrase. It could...

...be sim, something simple and I can'tremember some exact words at the moment, but there was a couple different turnsof phrase that o'll by by saying it a different way made it far more relevant to theaudience, and it was little. It was little new on things like that. It'sit's little Tweik Yo. I mean you'll notice that, even even with in English,you'll aturn a phrase, a proper turn ofphrase when you're speaking tosomebody can make something either relevant or irrelevant to them,depending on on which Yeu know, which way you point something out. You K, owand the otherything that we did is is not only did we have the point of salematerials, the videos exceptra there, but we also employed local people inthe boost themselves and we didn't bring them on board his industryexperts. We brought them on as ambassadors to bring people into thebooth and to act as translators. So therefore there was the ability ifthere were people that walked past the...

...booth that did not have a strongEnglish or could not converse in English. Those conversations couldstill happen with Yoo and make the people walking into the boo feelcomfortable right away. I love it okay, so this has been incredibly helpful.Ben For for for folks that are trying to enter foreign morkets is. Isthere any any other tibits or a piece of advice that that you think theyshould know before before kind of journeying into a a market that isrelatively unknown to them by a plain ticket d? I'm being absolutely serious?There's nothing that beats feet on the ground yeah, even if you're going towork with a distributor partner overseas, actually, physically being thereactually physically walking the trade shelf floors before you even exhibit,and actually going there and s having a...

...visualization of how do the trade showsdifferent in in that marketplace versus your marketplace? How are thingspresented? Howre you'll? Do Things happen in backrooms and in inhospitality Sueets, because in certain cultures, if you don't have ahospitality suite that you can invite people to that's off th the chaufor that can be a cultural FAPA? Also, it'sundeit's understanding those little things that you need to think about youthat are understood within that culture that you may not get by, not beingthere not seeing it for yourself. That makes that makes perfect sense. Then tto close out our time together. Today, I'm going to ask you a question thatI've been asking recently wh. What is what is the legacy that you want toleave behind mensorship? For me, the biggest legacy is...

...being able to be there for the nextgeneration. I work a lot with the local colleges and universities and do a lotof you, ow guest lecturing for free and and volunteering my time to make surethat the next generation of of marketers have every opportunity available tothem. You ow to be able to let them understand the history of of ourprofession. I, where it's been where it is where it's going and let them havethe UM benefit of my experience, because noone was ever there for me to give me that hand up when I was when I wastheir age, so it's it's, creating a legacy for the next generation to helpthem be better communicators and help them market more effectively been thisis this has been fantastic? If there's somebody listening to this, they wantto stay connected with you. They want to learn more about your brandmarketing. What's the best way for them to go about doing that, you know whatsocial media were everywhere. You can find this on facebook and also onLinton at your brand marketing.

Our website is your brand marketing.Dotcom and people can always find me Ben at your brand marketing t com. Ibeeble o think you so much for your time. Today, D, I really appreciate TJMS. Thank you very much for making the time to ensure that you never miss anepisode of the Beteby growth show subscribe to the show in Itunes or yourfavorite pot gas player. This guarantees that every episode will getdelivered directly to your device. If you are someone you know, would be anincredible guess. For the B to B grochew email me at Jonathan thatsweetfish media dotcom, let us know we love connecting wild bee to beexecutives and we love sharing their wisdom and perspective with ouraudience. Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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