577: The Power of Words: Language in a Global Context w/ Ben Baker

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Ben Baker, President of Your Brand Marketing.

Wouldn't it be nice to have severalthought leaders in your industry know and Love Your brand? Start a podcast,invite your industries thought leaders to be guests on your show and start reaping thebenefits of having a network full of industry influencers? Learn more at sweet fishMediacom. You're listening to the B tob growth show, a podcast dedicated tohelping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. What you're looking for techniques and strategiesor tools and resources? You've come to the right place. I'm JonathanGreen and I'm James Carberry. Let's get into the show. Welcome back tothe BB growth show. We are here today with Ben Baker. He isthe president of your brand marketing been. How you doing today? I amdoing just marvelous jams. Thanks for having me on the show. I appreciateyou joining us. been we're going to be talking today about the power ofwords, language and a global context,...

...and we were talking offline about astory of one of your clients that you worked with and why this topic wasso powerful for that particular client. But before we get into and unfolding thatstory, talking about the power of words, tell us a little bit about yourbrand marketing and what you and your team are up to over there.Yeah, thanks a lot. I mean we've been around. January will beten years. We've been around for ten years and the company focuses on threethings. We consult, we teach and we speak on brand message, marketvision and value. So what do we do? We work with our customersto be able to figure out what do they do, why do they doit? Who Do they do it for? Why do their customers care and helpthem engage them in a meaningful way. It's been a fun ride last tenyears. It's never boring. We work with B TOB clients, mostlyin the midtier and you know, every...

...day is something different. I loveit. I love it so so, Ben let's jump into the the storythat I alluded to earlier that really is setting up this entire conversation. Takeus back to that, to that time, and of what was going on withthe client before they engaged you, and then, and then we'll andthen we'll walk through kind of the results happened later. Absolutely so, mostof my clients have not all my clients I work on with a nondisclosure agreement. So I'm I can't mention names, but this was a fairly large companythat did a lot of work in Asia, in Europe and also in North America. And when they came to me, God, this is probably five,six, seven years ago, probably closer to seven years ago now,they had been working with another firm and they hadn't had a lot of successand in the Asian market and they were looking for somebody who could help themgain a foothold and to be able to...

...be a little bit more relevant inthat marketplace, because they felt that their product line was something that was absolutelyneeded there. But they just couldn't bring on the right distributors, they couldn'tbring on the right partners and they were having a lot of trouble, youknow, getting their value statement across to that market place. Got It okay, and so they've been trying with with another agency. Weren't able to doit. Obviously they engage you, guys. What kind of as you were kindof assessing what they were currently doing. It wasn't working. What did youfind? Well, the first thing we noticed was is that, andthis was advice they had got from elsewhere, this is that everything that they werebringing into the Asian market was an English and you know, it wasn'tthat the market place that they were going into didn't have people that were proficientin English. It's just that it's not the first language and we realize that, you know, that could be a...

...bit of a barrier, not asmuch for understanding, you know, the value of the proper project, butalso as a welcoming piece and and a bility, an ability to add trust. And we find that when you can walk into an International Mark Kit andyou can speak to them in their language and in their relevance and their culture, things tend to move quickly through the process, or at least a lotquicker through the process. And we found that their first challenge was everything thatthey had, from their point of SA sale materials to their their packaging,to their trade show displays, to their the flyers and pamphlets that they werehanding out, their brochures that they were hanging out. We're strictly in English, and we found that when they were going to, you know, varioustrade shows, that things were not being picked up, the conversations were nothappening, people were not walking into their...

...booth and because of that they werespending a lot of money just twiddling their thumbs and they were looking. Theywere looking for some different solutions. So then, what were you guys ableto implement that that ultimately allowed them to to see success as they were tryingto enter the Asian market? Well, we focused on their two biggest markets. One was Hong Kong and the other one was mainland China, and werealized that Mandarin Cantonese were definitely things that need to be dealt with. Theyneed to have some way to engage the audience in Mandarin Cantonese, and I'ma big believer of trade show boosts. You have a three second rule.Either people get what you do in the three seconds it takes they walk fromone end of your booth to the other, or they don't, and having peoplehaving to translate into English and think about it was was obviously creating achallenge in a barrier. So what we...

...did is we took their value propositionand we had them translated, we had their brochures translated, we had theirvideos overdubbed and we had all of their materials created in such a way thatthey were either bilingual or they were trilingual, as in terms of being able tomandarin or catneys, but at least they were speaking in the language ofthe people that were there. And you'll there's challenges that go along with that, and let me explain that. The challenges are when you're dealing with peoplehere that are translators, they may speak the language properly, they may understanda bit about the business, but they don't understand the regional cultural nuances.So yes, we had everything translated here, but the big thing that we didis we had those materials sent to Hong Kong, Shen's in Beijing,etc. Two different people that I actually knew, and had them look atthe material before we had them printed and...

...had them watch the videos with theoverdub before we had the know, we finalize them online. The reason beingis that way you got the cultural nuance. You know, they were not only, you know, scientifically correct in terms of the language, in termsof translation, but it went way beyond say the Google translated version. Itwent into actually using the language properly within the audience that was actually Yo interactingwith it. I love it. And so having people that were local inthat contact reviewing the content before you ever put anything out there at in theseconventions and trade shows that you were going to. was there anything that thatstood out, that those local people caught that you otherwise wouldn't have wouldn't haveseen? You know, some sometimes it was, you know, just aturn of phrase. It could be simple,...

...something simple, and I can't remembersome exact words at the moment, but there was a couple different turnsof phrase that, you know, by saying it a different way, madeit far more relevant to the audience. And it was little, it waslittle nuance, things like that. It's little tweaks and you'll, I meanyou'll notice that even even with an English you're a turn of phrase, aproper turn of phrase when you're speaking to somebody can make something either relevant orirrelevant to them, depending on what, on which we know, which wayyou point something out, you know. And the other thing that we didis is not only did we have of the point of sale materials, thevideos, etceter there, but we also employed local people in the boost themselves, and we didn't bring them on board as industry experts. We brought themon as ambassadors to bring people into the booth and to act as translators.So therefore, there was the ability if...

...there were people that walk past thebooth that did not have a strung English or could not converse an English thoseconversations could still happen with Yo and make the people walking into the booth feelcomfortable right away. Yeah, I love it. Okay, so this hasbeen incredibly helpful band for for for folks that are trying to enter foreign markets. Is Is there any any other tidbits or piece of advice that that youthink they should know before before kind of journeying into a market that is relativelyunknown to them by a plane ticket? Yeah, and I'm being absolutely serious, there's nothing that beats feet on the ground. Yeah, even if you'regoing to work with a distributor partner overseas, actually physically being there, actually physicallywalking the trade show floors before you even exhibit and actually going there andhaving a visualization of how do the trade...

...shows different in, you know,in that market place versus your market place? How are things presented? How areyou'll do things happen in back rooms and and in hospitality suits, becausein certain cultures, if you don't have a hospitality suite that you can invitepeople to, that's off the show floor. That can be a cultural full paw, you know. So it's under its understanding those little things that youneed to think about, you that are understood within that culture that you maynot get by not being there, not seeing it for yourself. That makesthat makes perfect sense. been that. To close out our time together today, I'm going to ask a question that I've been asking recently. What iswhat is the legacy that you want to leave behind mentorship? For me,the biggest legacy is being able to be...

...there for the next generation. Iwork a lot with the local colleges and universities and do a lot of,you know, guest lecturing for free and volunteering my time to make sure thatthe next generation of marketers have every opportunity available to them, you know,to be able to let them understand the history of our profession, you know, where it's been, where it is, where it's going, and let themhave the benefit of my experience, because no one was ever there forme to give me that hand up when I was when I was their age. So it's creating a legacy for the next generation to help them be bettercommunicators and help them market more effectively. been this is this has been fantastic. If there's somebody listening to this, they want to stay connected with you. They want to learn more about your brand marketing. What's the best wayfor them to go about doing that? You know what social media were everywhere. You can find us on facebook and...

...also on Linkedin at your brand marketing. Our website is your brand Marketingcom and people can always find me at beenat your brand marketingcom awesome today. Will thank you so much for your timetoday. I really appreciate it a jams. Thank you very much for making thetime. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the B TobGrowth Show, subscribe to the show and Itunes or your favorite podcast player.This guarantees that every episode will get delivered directly to your device. If youor someone you know would be an incredible guest for the B tob growth show, email me at Jonathan at sweet fish Mediacom. Let us know. Welove connecting with be to be executives and we love sharing their wisdom and perspectivewith our audience. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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