573: Inbound Lead Gen Without the Long, Slow Build-Up w/ Simon Thompson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we once again get to talk to Simon Thompson, Founder of Content Kite and Growth Assembly.

Wouldn't it be nice to have severalthought leaders in your industry, Kno and love your brand start a podcast,invite your industries thought leaders to be guess on your show and startreaping the benefits of having a network full of industry. influencerslearn more at sweetfish media Dotcom, your listening to the B TB Groth showpodcast dedicated to helping B to B executives, achief explosive grownwhener you're looking for techniques and strategies, tools and resources.You've come to the right place. I'm Jonathan Green, I'm James Carburry.Let's get it into the show woem back to the be to be Gros show.Today we are joined by Simon Thompson. Simon is the founder of content kite.He also has a new agency called growth assembly. This is this is also hissecond time appearing on the be to b gross show. So we are thrilled to tohave Simon here joining us actually from Australia today, which isfantastic, sigmon. Welcome back to the show. Thank you very much for having mebacktoon T in glad to be here well, ee, it's great to have you back. We had wehad a great time, um on your on your previous episode. That was episode MFive. Oh Five, I think, which is how to actually convert your readers withcontent H, Os wo. I encourage everyone to check that out. If you haven't had achance to today, we 're going to be talking about this very cool idea, verynear endear to my own hearts Um, since we've been doing this show for almosttwo years, but today's topic is sort of a inbound Legien, but without the longslow build up. So I I definitely know about the long slow build up two yearsof doing a daily show yeah. That is, that is, that is a process. So I'mexcited to talk to you today about this idea of leveraging the concept ofborrowing an audience, we're ging to get into all that. But before we do,let's Talk Samon, real, quick about this New Agency of Yours GrowthAssembly and what you and your team are...

...up to yeah awesome. So Sir grotassembly came as orfairly organically out of our first agency content, cit sofor for context, Contacthart to content marketing agency, and we were actuallydoing a lot of work, Weh well, predoimintly, Bey, dobey brand, so likelike aft development companies, web development companies, that kind ofthing and for the the companies that we had. You know really good relationshipswet. They were asking us. What are you guys doing to to generate leads 'cause,we're both sort of yeah agencies and we're both in the bed o Bas pase. Soyou K, O w we'd talk shop and we said you know we're doing this that and theother. It came down to to three main things that we ere doing, one of whichwe're going to talk about today. But eventually it got to a point with someof those clients that we had with content ce where they were like O,that's sense, cool d. You think you could help us out with that, and wesaid yes sure and, and that started to happen more and more, and we were justgoing to incorporate that as part of our offering with content kite, but aswe sort of moved further down the road with it, t became more apparent that Iwould just make more sense to separate that as a a new brand, and so that'swhere growth assembly came from so we're a BTE B leg generation agency,awesome, that's fantastic! So I'm Saing we're we're sort of laying down thesome brownwork explaining to our listeners, who are tuning in why theyshould be listening to you about this idea of inboundlegeneration without thelong slow build of so signing. Take it away, Wer e!! what are we talking abouthere today? Yeah forshous, if, if you've done a bit of rating on in Banlageneration or you've, you kno like started, generating and be ladsyourself, you'll know that it's it's generally not a very vast process. It'syou know, like you, cray content, whether that be when you're blog orponcast or outrupe, channel, whatever it may be, and maybe after three sixtwelve months, you start getting some...

...some imbound interest. Yeah, that'sthat's generally how it works. Maybe you've got it a bit quicker than that,and I I wouldn't say that that's a bad idea, woulnt. I stoppe doing that. Infact, iwould say every company that has the resources of O r time or money toto create content should absolutely be doing it, but a lot of companies don'tand Y, even if they do there's there's still this other way of doing it y. Ah,I woudn't hold the suspense for too long, which can start generating in badleads quite quickly and at the same time it builds your own audience forwhen you you do start crading content. So by leveraging this concept ofborrowing an audience so where most inbandly generation revolvesaround creding content, an building your own audience and people coming to here read your content out. Borrowingan audience is simply putting yourself in front of someone else's audience.Who has already done that Legwok for you, so in a very metter sense, this isactually kind of what I'm doing right now, I'm I'm borrowing the Beeto begrowth audience which you know like at first can sound like like Soo, you knowbeing manipulative here and he's he's just you know using all of Jonathan'sidwork to to get in front of the audience and he's waping all thebenefits, but I mean I'll be Golt. That's all the time we have here on eeshow thank so much for joining us now, but I mean this really does not work.If you don't give a ton of value to that audience, Ike, it's not going toreap any benefit whatsoever. If I sit here and just you know, sell my waysand yeah talk about myself and and don'tprovide any real values so y, it's I like to think it's. It's a win winforever and you know I I give away as much content as I possibly can in in afifteen minute period. You get some...

...free content, they listeners get thecontent also, and you know potentially I get some enquiries out of it andthat's sort of he the concept in t a nutshell. So that's just placingyourself in front of someone's audience and- and it is Y- U you've sort ofalluded to it, Ou that it can be a bit of a delicate balancing act because you know, did you have to be producingvaluable content? My My cohost James and I we we joke back and forth all thetime. You know that e we're able to get fantastic, really intelligenct, dynamicguests on the show. Ou Know: We've got an audience there coming on andproviding content, which is great, but then you know we always jove that. Well,YOU OW! You get to a point where n you find yourself in a group, andeveryone is just kind of sharing each other's content a and pattingthemselves on the back, and it just kind of becomes this. You know it it'swell! I I don't know how to put this without coming across incredibly crass,but basically everyone is just patting themselves on the back and nothing isactually getting generated. No, no. No quality content is being created,there's no value being added when you're. Just all self congratulatingyou know, yeah, that's it and I mean the beauty of it is like. Thankfully,the beauty of it is like I'm going to get nothing out of this f. If I was tojust come on and do that and just talk about myself, because I mean yeah, itreally only works. If I provide some really good value to the audience and-and you know show that that I'm an expert- and I can do the Xine said Yeah-and I think that's that's the right mentality to have is. Is this ideathiss, something that that James Speaks on frequently? Is this idea of addingvalue? First and it's N, you know we're not know we're not bringing SimonThompson on t to talk about how Great Simon Thompson is and everything thatSimon Thomson can do for you or Oere...

...we're here providing lessons. You knowvaluable information, a resource that that, hopefully our listeners areactually getting value out of beyond just work with Simon. You know, there'sthere's lessons and takeways to be had that everyone can use just by virtue ofhaving listen to the show. So that's always something that we have sort ofat the forefront of our minds ad value first, and I so I think you get it. I'msure that our I'm sure that our listeners get it and it can be afantastic thing to to borrow an audience. But let's sort of okaylet'sto to your next point- and I've got a few bullet points here in frontof me as actually then how to get in front of any audience. What does thatlook like yeah? So, just first of all, there there's plenty of ways you can dothis. So in this scenario, we're talking in the context of going onsomeone else's podcast. That's a really great way to do it. It's my personalfavorite, but I mean there's plenty of other ways to do it, so you might do apublic speaking Gig, so someone else is putting an event on you go and speak infront of that audience that they've already organized to be there. Youcould do something like a co Webbernar. I guess the most popular one in theworld at the moment would be guesse posting, which is you know just likeputting your text content on someone else's blog, but regardless of whichway you want to borrow an audience theres, there's generally a prettydefined way, O of how you get in front of them. So the best the best way to doit is if you have a preexisting relationship with someone who alreadyhas an audience, and that way you can, you know, start going into hey I'. I'vegot this idea of what I can talk to your audience aboutx, Y aid. What do you think and if it is relevant for that person's audience,there there's no reason to say no, where I you can get a bit fifty fiftyyears, if you don't have a relationship at all, but it it's definitely duableand, and he is why...

...you know better than anyone thatcreating content as consistently as you do, especially for a daily show likethat is a lot of work, and you know there, there are services outthere that charge a lot of money to bring guests on to a show right. It'sit's, it's a job, that's worth paying money for so you you've got a big jobto do in terms of putting content in front of your audience. If I can cometo you and say Jonathan here's my background, I can talk about Xwi ad. Ithink all of those topics would be valuable to your audience. Based onwhat I know, what do you think if you read that and say this guy's, justlaying out a show in front of me? All I have to do is say yes, I get on thephone, then I'm assuming here btell me. If I'm wrong, then that may soundappealing to you a as long as the content that I'm going to talk about toyour audience is is going to the good, Oh less less word for me. Yeah allright sign me for that. That's it so yeah I mean that thatpitch can come in the form of y, an email or or phone call or whatever itmight be, but you know whethe you'r trying to get a a public speaking gigor or get a podcast or whatever it may be. You know it's all about just makingthe audience owners life as easy as possible and if you can just show thatyou've got good content and and make it easy for them. That's that's. Ththectyeah give give that person the path of least resistance, O that'sperfect, and I mean I'm it's it's funny. How self referential this Episodis'cause Iam Unrelly? Looking at the you know the one sheet you send over withhey here's, a list of topics that you know have been on my mind and thingsI've been working with. You know how did YEU sound for episode, Boombo bonebreakdown Oky how to get in front of any audience talked about it next. Whatto do then once you're in front of that audience mm? Yes, we kind of touched onthis before n. An a very overarching...

...sense. It' just give as much value ashumanly possible. So, like I said it really just doesn't work a few comeonto a show or r get in front of an audience, and you just start talkingabout what you do, because no one really cares until you've, given themsomething of value. So if you think about just about any purchase that you may have made, youknow like this S, high ticked or or services or consulting, or anythinglike that S, like you, need to establish trust with that person beforeyou start doing that, and the best way to do that is to give them some freestuff which establishes that you're able to provide value. So if youdemonstrate that you can provide value for free, then it goes to follow thatyou could potentially provide a lot more value for a dollar amount, so that' sort of a Cruof it just put as much value as you can demonstrate that you're able to providevalue as perfect and sort of then s the last piece ofthe equation. You know you're you're, trying to you, know, work on that inbound, leadgeneration, and so that is comes down tot setting up some sort of mechanism,so you're actually bringing a portion of that audience into your own audience.Yes, I I did just forget something on on the last question which which Ithought was important, so I'm just going to go back to that. If that's allright, um but th, this comes out with the plintsthat we would do consulting with them on this particular topic Um. So our rule of them is just give awaythe house, and that may be Imean like give away your secret source, whateverit is, which often gets pushback and for good reason, because if, if you'regiving away too much knowledge, you may think that you know you're giving awaytoo much that person's just going to take that information and run with it.But more often than not. If it's more about just showing that you're theexpert, and if that person...

...wants to take that information and runwith it, they can more ofven than t it doesn't happen. They would prefer tooutsource that to to the expert and you're the person WHO's taught them howto do it. So they see you as the person who knows how to do it. So in aroundabout way it S. it's give away more information than you arecomfortable with giving away, because if, if you underdo it, it's it's justnot going to work yo now, mand you're, building credibility. Your buildingthat that relationship in your building that trust, so all that makes makessense conceptually once you know when you're actually faced with it you'repersonally yourself in in real time. You do. I think it's not surprisingthat there is and you've seen some some push back like welll. No, I mean thisis we've spent years developing this. Why am I just you know giving away theprocess, but so it cans a little bit conteritutive when you are faced withit. You know personally in real life, but I think you're, one hundred percenton the money obviouse of theres limits to it. If youhave m e intellectual property, that's Circu,secret or or whatever like. U, Kno, don't go that BUB, but no one noone isgiving away the cocacola seeker recipe. Anything like that. That's it that's it,but but t goantee next question of of so y you're in front of the audience.You talk value as as much as you possibly can, and then you need to create a next step, becausea next step isn't going to really work. If I was to come on Herean, they likeyeah, give me a call n and let's work together, we're not there yet we're notquite there in the relationship. So the next step is generally to set up thismechanism of a lead magnet which many of the listeners may be familiar with.But it's just something of more value that I can offer to the audience that will in exchange I get their emailaddress and just the ability to continue a relationship and thatrelationship is, is furthermorl going...

...to be value driven. You know if someonewas to sign up to my email list, or you know subscribe to my Youtube Channelwhatever it may be. After this episode, I I'm not just going to go straightinto a pitch, I'm going to provide more value and and Ju give Tiv IV give give.So the next step, I'm going to say at this end of this show you Kn W.everyone should go to growth assembly, otcom, Ford, Slashbee, O big growth andyou'll just find more value there, and you can take that information and runwith it. I'm not saying anyone has to work with me in exchange for that, butit it's important to just give yourself the opportunity to continue therelationship and a lead. Magn is a great way to do that perfect. Well andSimon. It's always a pleasure, of course haveig you on the show. You knowyou know your stuff. You know what you're taling about you're well spoken:You're, you've kind of got this value, first mentality, which is which isfantastic Simon, an youhad mentioned the link, we're gon Ta, we're going toget that included in the shownots anything else. You want to say eitherabout that Languor. If anyone in our audience is interested in connectingwith you after today's episode finding out a little bit more about growthassembly, what's the best way for them to go Abo doing that Yeahso I I'd reador at the point you just Ma f the importance of a value. First Mindset Y,like this, takes everyone a while to come round to it certainly took it,took me a while, but Um yeah. I I just think you should give away much morethan you're comfortable with at first. I will we yet well it'll beuncomfortable at first, but it will get easier and easier and easier, and Ithink if everyone did that the world, the business world ou be much betterplace so give away as much as possible so leading Om from that H. Great Assembly has a three part: VideoTraining Series on on Le Generation in bound being one component of that, andso, if you' Loke, to sign up for that go to growth, assembly com, fordslash,BETERB, growth, cantasican again, Wel...

...we'll include that link in the shownotes. We've again been talking to Simon Thomson Sciping in from Australia,which is fantastic. This is my. This is a tail end of my day last interview ofthe day, but you're just getting your day started. Simand so have a fantasticrest of your day and we hope to have you back on the show again soon. Osomethink so much of Atenue Jenathan Apresat it to ensure that you never missed anepisode of the bbi growth show subscribe to the show in Itunes or yourfavorite pot cass player. This guarantees that every episode will getdelivered directly to your device. If you ar someone, you know, would be anincredible guess. For the B to B Groshel email me at Jonathan thatsweetfish media dtcom, let us know we love connecting, would be to beexecutives nd. We love sharing their wisdom and perspective with ouraudience. Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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