569: How This Agency Aimed Small to Get Big Results w/ Reid Carr

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Reid Carr, President and CEO at Red Door Interactive.

Are you struggling to come up withoriginal content, weaken and weak out start a pondcast interview, your idealclients? Let them talk about what they care about most and never run out ofcontent ideas again learn more at sweetfish media dotcom. You were listening to the BEATAB growthshow pat cast medicated to help be to be executive, achieve explosive grown,whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources.You've come to the right place, I'm Jane's Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green.Let's get into the show, welcome back to the BEATO, be growthshow we are here today with Reed car. He is the president and CEO a red door.Interactive, read how R you doing today. Oh I'm doing great thanks robbing me,I'm stoked to Chot with you today read we're going to be talking about thisidea of aiming small to get big and really how how focus creates growth-and you guys have done an exceptional job of this, but before we get into thestory and kind of the sixteen years of growth that you've experienced at reddoor ould love for our listeners to just understand a bit of context, isyou know what is read O or interactive? What a unit team up to over there,absolutely yeah so eidnt at a high level, we're we're an advertisingagency and an we help. Brands make their mark and and connect to theirconsumers through the various channels that they have at the disposal sotrying to tell effective stories, make sure they're informed by good decisionmaking and in data and then connecting the brand meaneful ways to to consumers.That e are going to carr a lot about t'em to love it ov it, and so, as wewere talking about this, this idea read off wine. I was really fascinated bywhat you were saying and how you have deployed this idea of aiming small toget big over the course. You know the sixteen years of you running youragency. Can you walk us back to sixteen years ago? You' E you'restarting you know baby business and...

...take us back to that moment and walk usthrough kind of the stages of as you're figuring out that man, the the smallerI aim, the bigger results I get and Yeah d well going to start there and goyeah, absolutely a it's it's fun to to think back to those those early days.You know, because you have a lot of decisions you have to make and and oneof the ones that's always pressing on your mind is how am I going to get morebusiness and how I' Gong Ta Kindo keep this thing going 'cause. It was a bigRIS, starting it in the first place Yep. So you know, one of the bigger risks wecan take is is certainly saying look there's a lot of things you shouldn'tbe doing because it feels like you should be doing absolutely everythingto bring revenue in the door and I think that's a lot of times. I thinkone of the first mistakes that even established Brans, not just the theMimi brands make is- I say man I need to appeal to more people or more things,so that can get more businessor get any any kind of leades whatsoever and ittakes a lot of discipline, a and probably a little bit of hard bone tosay you know what now there are things that I am going to be really good atand I'm not going to accept everything N, I say accept a mood for Stark: it'snot that people are beating down your door necessarily. So it's not that hyou're having to refuse so many things. But what are you really going to pursueand- and you don't necessarily know, Deon- that what's going to be perfectatl the time? What was the first thing with you read? What was the first kindof moment in in the life of the business where you said, nope we're notgoing to take this opportunity, because we're focusing here yeah I mean so whatwe were starting to understand is what was going to be so critical N in n themarketers world at the time, which was pobviously the transformation andmovement toward toward digital. So, thankfully, I think we were at theright era in time where it really didn't take atonemic experience to havea lot of relative experience N in that space. So, but really that was ourfocus was helping. People understand that we felt wastheir Internet presentsand getting them speaking a little bit bigger about where they were existingonline, how they were showing up for...

...consumers that were startendg in shelerthere, an drods. So what was really important to s? And the funny thing isthe ironic irony of the worldwide lab in the sense that you could reachanyone anywhere and then conceptiond. Do you work for anyone anywhere Ar ourfirst ky strategy was really focused on our own backyard, which you know someof the early advisers and people who feel like? Oh Man, you're, juststarting up and beed to do business with anyone anyhow, however, businesscan be done. Our focus was really in our own backyard, so I felt like we hadto earn it, but e people who are closest to us and the fact is, asanyone knows, in marketing it'. Some of this is about repetition. So how do youstay in front of enough people and four times, and here only a few people atthe time there was like four of us starting things out, so it was. Youknow local advance, N and actually meeting people face the base, butfocusing on the white kinds of businesses that were going to need thekinds of all services and work that Ye were doing and, in particular, Wservice base. Businesses like ours like an advertising or many others. A lot ofthose keyd clients were saying: Hey what's work, you know for someone wholooks what's work, you've done for someone who looks exactly like me, sobuilding in Porfolio on work, Ein particular categories was prettycritical. Osso at the next one could come in the door and say: okay, yeah,I've. Se you've done something for somebody who looks like me, so we hadto really start understaing where we wanted to go and what were good kindsof clients that were going to be scalable into the next plient that wewanted to work wit, gotit and again doing it in our own backyard. Despitebeing available to anyone in the world, um was really what our our firststrategy was got it you guys decided to focus locally there in San Diego, youknow, meeting people at events, Y Kno, mdoing, doing your own events, Wa. Whatthen C th the next evolution in the story of of Kindo aiming small to getbig you you saw you tasted the results,...

...as you started, to focus N on San Diego.What what came next yeah? So then, you start to you know, as we start doing,work o a handful more mor companies and you start to recognize what ones were,having greater success with the kinds of work that we were doing so,tactically, you know in in terms of building sites and doing sc o and doingsome of the other tactics that we had at our our disposal, who was gettingthe best, the the greatest benefit from what we were doing and really startkind of parring that down by industry by size by you, kno handful of Priteriathat really started to conceptually to limit the world. So even then cuttingit another. Another way which is saying. Okay, here are the businesses that areavailable to us in Scandiega, of which there are still many many businesses,but then cutting that even further an said. You know what we were having alot of success with. You know at the time reallyonwith. Some of theseadventure backed companies who were having to scale in certain kind of newdomains and compete with bigger companies who were maybe lying behind.We started kind of defining with thos preterio whe criteria was that workedreally well for us and we're getting the bos benefit because then a the morebenefit that they get from us, the more just the happier they are with us, thene more likely they were them to prefer us to other people will be a greatreference for us Ho ferred other people to them to check us out so very quickly.We Ha we've limited our world m. You know kind of password even further whenwe started sayking another level of clients that were working really wellwith, and we limited our world to about forty different companies, an MallofSan Diego. He said these are forty companies that we think are a good fotforus got it, but the work that you were doing for those forty companieswas making you really attractive to other companies that looked exactlylike those forty companies weexactly, so yeah. The handful of companies atthat point that we were working within then yeah were what these other fortymight might be. A good fo ores, but the profound benefit of that of of havingforty companies to pursue. You know...

...think about this know: N Your ownanybody's world. Right now in terms of t e their relationships. I somebodywalks up to and says: Hey you know anybody WHO MEES marketing services.You know you might be al O M Thay! Think about it. I don't know yow doingknow people marketing infut a lot on the person you're asking compared to.If I walk up to you and say hey, you know anyone at this company. You say:Oh, I do. I know Jo now, whether or not therein marketing or anything like that,so hey would youwel y know. We've had a good experience with you. Would you beWa willing to to just connect me with that person, so I can kind of get toknow them a little bit, but it gives us it gave us a ton of runway on thatbecause we weren't trying to boil the ocean we weren't having to hire allsorts of sales people to pound the pavement in every corner of the country.I mean he was starting to build these personal relationships with people, andthen we could get the rets in front of these people that that built trust. Youwere at events where they were at. We were hosting events where they thatwere built around their needs, because it's pretty easy ence. You struck toreally focus on an industry, a type of client to go. Oh, you know these arethe things they're dealing with right now, so I can crap in te bed just forone or two companies, Yo know destbite having fifty people show up. Fo IRT,really at the end of the day, was just for the sake of these two companiesthat were really trying to court right now and if I get one of them, Wer we'regreat yeah. This whole thing paid off. I love that I'm not sure if you'refamiliar with Singarm Vazera from terminus, but a few years ago hestarted this. This movement called Flip my funnel, and it sounds really similarto what you're talking about it's just jus like Oh yeah. You know we can dothings. We can create content to try to attract the masses, but the reality isthey're only you know very small percentage of those people that weattract will be the type of people that we're wanting to work for. So instead,if you flip the funnel- and you say- Hey I'm going to go out and I'm goingto find these forty target accounts or these forty companies in San Diego thatI know we could. We could just crush it for and then we're going to hand tohandcombat each one of these forty. You can...

...sort to get real creative with how youengage each one of those worty companies like what you guys did a Dand proved to be successful with so I love this idea, there's just so muchmore targeted focus on the exact client that you know that you can get resultsfor as opposed to spending all these effort trying to attract people thatyou know, aren't really your ideal fit yeah, no exactly right, and I thinkwhat I alwas to tell peoples like you know their concerns like wow. Well,what if none of them want to buy right? Now or something like that, it's likepe ith Ta Day with all that focus and if you have a certain track record andhistory you're going to get quatital damage too. If you're aiming at thebull's eye, you know, there's still some people out there you didn't knowexisted, you are still a good fit that might reach out or you might becauseu're you're starting to build a network and starting to build a reputationwithin a category. So it's not like that. All of a sudden there's just thisother world is no longer available to you either, but you'R, that's just notwhere your focus is, and sometimes you just get a happy accent Yep. No, I Ilove it. I let it read. Is there any other before we I'm going to startasking? This is the first episode where, where I'm goingto start asking aquestion at the end of heach interview, but before I get to that question, isthere anything else around this idea of aiming small to get big that you thinklisteners should walk away with before we we close out the interview? Yeah, Imean it S. just the thing that that Y K o want people understand is t is soeasy is the new jerk reaction is to kind of say, Hey. I need to make myselfavailable two more people in avoiding that nejor reaction is probably all thehardest things that certainly the leadership past hit has to do, but oncethey start to kind of get get themselves immerse in the world oftheir ideal. Customer it' US amazing how quickly the world actually opens upeven further, and so you know as we it's we're, not just local anymore andwe've gone national as well as because we've owned that right and we and wecontinue to refine in greater detail a...

...smaller focus on a type of cusoo thatworks really well, of which there are still thousands outtatmso. It's notlike you w the world just gets a lot smaller, faster INA, a very useful way,but it still is a pretty darn big world. So I'm not trying to say that peopleare going to get limiting themselves. I think it's awaiting said GROBID. No, soread the the last question that I'm going to ask that. I'm going to startasking in each of these interviews is what what would you say is the legacythat you want to leave behind. So you know one of the biggest things for us.RENDOR is the idea of celebrating the individual on a lot of different levels,and so the legacy that hopefully we're doing here within our company, but thenoutsore outside of our company, pilantrophically and beyond, is reallyhelping. People pursue their dreams, understand who they are as anindividual and what's going to make them happy and the work that they do,that occupy so much of of their life on a day to day basis, so tiln propically.We support reading programs because we believe that entely, those creetingprograms that are below hundred third grade, as they say, kids, who theylearn to read uptil third grade and then they read to learn third grade andbeyond and Um, and when you're able to read your wold opens up and then youcan explore of things that are meatinful to you. So you know we takethat as a filn profit H, platmorn, but we bring that kind of thing here.Internally, as well at the company in making sure that people really do findtheir passions, we operatein from a place of strength if you've ever beenexposed, the strength, flinder and a lot of different mechanisms. That say,let's identify who we ach re as individuals bring ourselves together tocollaborate and respect one another and and Um Rom the end of the day celebratethese individuals. Alot people live Taliketay, one o I sof F homeflice insome way or supporting man on facilityting ot in building thaphilosophy. Here that will endure well...

PAS. My Life Tun, O ov it red this hasbeen fantastic. I really appreciate your time today if there's somebodylistening to this and they want to stay connected with you or they want tolearn more about red door. What's the best way for them to go abou. Doingthat absolutely so foreddor our website is red doord on Biz, so Redcorbiz theywon't follow me on twitter. I cowboy I I cowboy the whole story that goes ionwit, tat, T ha, but but that's of the place you can find me on twitter, andcertainly anyone ever wants to just send me an Emae, I' ur Car Dora, BizRarr, a Dorno BIS, so ow happy to connect with anyone that way as well asHossom Reed. Well, I'm not going to let you go before you explain the eyecowboy a so so, not real, quick yeah. So I harped on to it her pretty much.You Know Lt right as it surface and it was kind of this era. We were you knowit's all in contect of that day that you're popping on there what's top ofmine dwere having a conversation about the web being a wildwild West and youknow we're at the forefront and your hired gun to to kind of help. Peoplethrough it. So this whole Internet cowboy thing was like o a topic of theday that ultimately was like yeah. I coboy ie thought it was pue didn'trealize. sqwitter was really good, be as big as it ultimately was, and so wejust sort of you know, went with it. So I grabbed my actual name Atte car, butI don't put anything there O. I don't know I just I. I still hadacashing forthe eye cowboy thing and and H, and this perpetual reminder of of thesethings. It's moments in time that you know it just you never know when it'sgoing to turn into the big thing that it is so i 's just I feel like it'semblematic about in some wiit. I love that story. Thanks for Char, read allright! Well, Hay you gote! I connect with Reed on twitter, Ey cowboy, youknow, shoot hem, an email check out their website, red door, dot, Tiz andread, and thank you think you so much frue time,...

IOS Social Med, examine er Shewe usedthe responses to those questions to Fel wit content. We write for reallypopular websites so head over to sweetdish meety otcom slush questionsan sign up today. Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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