561: How to Keep the Human Touch at Scale w/ Eric Peters

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Eric Peters, Sr. Growth Marketing Manager at HubSpot Academy.

There's a ton of noise out there. So how do you get decision makers to pay attention to your brand? Start a podcast and invite your ideal clients to be guests on your show. Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the be tob growth show, a podcast dedicated to helping be tob executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the B tob growth show. We are here today with Eric Peters. He is the senior growth marketing manager of hub spot academy. Eric a doing today. They they're great to be here. I'm excited to chat with you, Eric. We are going to be talking about keeping the element of human touch at scale as it relates to our marketing technology. And so with you, with hub spot growing...

...as fast as you guys have grown, I think you are the perfect person to talk about this. But I want you to give our listeners just a little bit more context. Is To to who you are and and really you know what is hub spot academy for those I think everybody listening to this is from there with hub spot. But talk to us a little bit about hub spot academy and your role in that part of the organization. Sure, so, I sit on the marketing department here at hub spot and Hubsot Academy actually, says, on the services department, partly because historically hup spout academy has been there to teach our users how to use our software. It came about from that customer enablement function and only recently have we opened up, early in the last few years, I should say, have we opened up the courses and the certifications to the world and really developed a online learning platform to really teach marketers how to be great marketers and sales reps how to be great sales ups. As hub spot grew, you know, we were always known for giving that White Glove service a new customer comes on, where there were part...

...of your team. We have a services team that is world renowned at supporting our customers and helping them achieve whatever they are looking to achieve the hub spot. But as we reached tenzero customers, Twentyzero customers, we needed a way to scale that training so, rather than one to one training with individual customers, that became one too many training. So that's where Hup spout academies are to grew from. I love it. I love it, and so one of the things that I want to touch on with you, Eric, and really kind of kick off the conversation is around this, really talking about why you think marketers tend to lose touch with the fact that the people on the other side of their marketing automation are actually humans. They're not just numbers. But why do you think it's so easy for marketers to forget that? You know, we're driven by data fundamentally. I think when you look for great marketers, you want marketers with really good and all its analytical skills, and...

...that can of course, that's a really powerful and you need to trust the numbers and you know, it's great to have data driven markets, but it's easy to forget that, yeah, those are people there. You know the email that you just sent to five hundred people, those are normal people on their way to work looking at your email on their phone and etc. So there's a balance that we need to strike between using data to analyze and reportant measure and see changes in how we are doing and whether we're what we're doing is working. But then there's this, you know, customer empathy, this feeling of yeah, that's a real person. They have a lot of stuff going on. You know, as a marketer it's easy to think of our users are spending a hundred percent of their time in our software and it's you know, it's a upshot is as important to them as it is to me, you know, because I work here. But actually the whole point of upsot is to save users time and to be a productivity booster and you know, the less of their time they spend in the platform actually the better for...

...them. So remembering that, you know, your offer, your product and service, is actually only a piece of their day is, I think, an important thing for marketers to to think about. And and how is that in your role with hub spot academy? How has that mindset impacted the work that you're doing on a day to day basis? Well, we're learning all kinds of things as we move into new regions and new types of users. So, if you can imagine. So, but academy, when it was just customer enablement, we had a pretty like you know, clear segment. We had marketing managers with small teams at small to medium sized businesses using our software. When we opened up those courses to everyone, suddenly we had, you know, tons of students and professors coming in from colleges. We had people from all over the world coming in wondering why we don't offer it and the same offer these courses in the same languages that we offer the product of. Nope, totally different one. As we develop more sales training. salespeople are a whole different type of views are, you know, self education isn't...

...quite as natural to sales reps as it might be a marketers who really need to always stay in the know on what's next. So learning from our users and seeing what their needs are and surveying them and having focus groups with them, but also just measuring how they progress through the software. And you know, if it's a user from this region of the world and they're taking the course, why are they taking of course, you know there's that job to be done. Question of like, are they doing it to learn the topic, are they doing it to get a certification to help them get a job, or are they doing it to skill up at a new job and their employer just wants them to do it and maybe there's a little bit less self motivation, there are more external motivation, and so understanding why they're doing it obviously shapes the style of the curriculum, how it's delivered to them and so on exactly. And, yeah, whether we offer a mobile version of the course or whether we the author of the transcription, which has, which is actually become quite a task. You know, when we, when hub spot...

...has me of a whole localization team. Then when we translate, say, an Ebook, it's pretty cut and dry. You know, translate it, approve it, check it, make sure it all makes sense, make sure it makes sense in that region, of course, but when you are translating and localizing a course with an exam attached to it, you better make sure every single word spoken in that course matches up perfectly with the exam, because you're putting people through this emotional roller coaster of learning and then assessment and it's a career, you know thing. It's so close to their heart. It's not just a marketing ebook. So they're going to get really frustrated and really angry if it doesn't if the exam doesn't seem like it's fair because we didn't localize it correctly. Got It. Erica, I've got a question. We didn't talk about this offline, but but I'm curious after you mentioned that. So I was just talking with Aaron done at snap APP about interactive content and he mentioned that when you create a content asset, be that an assessment or...

...some some sort of interactive piece where a prospect is putting in very valuable information, but the reason they're giving you that information is because there's something on the other end of that that is actually beneficial to them. So be that, you know, some sort of an assessment that tells them if, if they're, you know it, infrastructure is, you know, safe from a certain type of virus. They're willing to tell you, you know, different intricacies of their of their company, because they know that your promise is to give them an accurate assessment. He shared a variety of different examples. But do you guys think of hup spot academy as a kind of interactive content piece? Does it allow you to find out more about potential buyers so that your sales team can have conversations, or or is that not really at all? How you guys think about it to a degree. You know, we don't part of our terms of services not to share any specifics about how you perform.

Even if your boss is asking, okayes, how you did on an exam, we wouldn't share that. But we can certainly see which courses you're taking or which courses you've started and which once you've passed, and things like that. And our sins team is really structured and taught and trained to just be helpful. So yes, they'll call up and say, Hey, I saw you, you know, took that certification and I'm happy to you know, discuss any points where you miss understood something or, you know, truly be helpful. But it's not a it's not really a tool necessarily built for that. That's sort of a side effect of having that data. With the up spot. One thing that we're working on now, as we built up spot academy, really into hub spot. We have a team dedicated to this, this product now, and what they're starting to build our well we're calling modules, are little lessons where they can send you through a piece of the software...

...and say go, you know, create a new contact in the CRM and it'll actually listen to see if they successfully did it. So there's some, you know, interesting trigger devices happening in the software where we can see, okay, are they learning? Are they actually applying what they're learning? And we structure learning on this idea of the blooms taxonomy. Basically it's like a maslow's hierarchy kind of triangle where at the bottom, yes, you can just regurgitate information, a level of is that you can apply information, or level up in that is that you can judge someone else's ability to do that. So we're trying to move higher up in that blooms taxonomy to not only show them how to do something but then listen and see if they can actually apply with the just learning. I love it. That's that's that's really impressive. Another thing that you had mentioned offline, Eric, you talked about and as marketers were trying to recreate something that that that should happen. Naturally. You gave an example of Seo and kind of the evolution of that. Can you...

...explain and go a little bit deeper on that for our listeners? Sure. So we used to have a SEO professor specifically on Seo and then we had a separate content marketing professor, these two roles and these two topics really combined into one. Good content marketing keeps search engine optimization and mind and good in search of autanization requires thought for content marketing, and what we're seeing at hub spot is the evolution from being very keyword specific, focused on you know, which keywords are my optizing for, because, you know, ten years ago people would search for a keyword. Now it's much more conversational and it's switch one based on topics. So how do you create a piece of content that ranks for a topic rather than a key word? And you do that by creating clusters of, you know, pieces of content that all link back up so you can sort of map out. You know, I have these five blog posts that are subtopics that all link back to a central, what we...

...call pullar page that is, you know, hopefully going to rank for that topic, and what we're doing there is really just, you know, mimicking what should happen naturally, you know, articles about a specific topic should link to each other and Google's algorithms are going to sort of judge the relevance and authority of those links between pages. And I wouldn't call it like gaining the Google Algorithm, but it's really just structuring your content in a way that makes sense for google, Google's algorithm, to read. And there's a lot of things in marketing that we do that way, you know, whether it's setting up nurturing emails to be sent out when someone does a specific thing. We're really just trying to recreate that. You know, I walk into a coffee shop and the Barista knows my name and he knows what I want and you know, we're real that really a good feeling of like Oh, this business knows me. Yeah, we can do that. That's still by using contextual marketing. Gotta is that doing things like intentionally sending nurture emails that elicit or...

...response that then tells you, as the marketer and of where to bucket this person. So, you know, I like I've seen like Pat Flynn, for example, since you know, one of the early emails in his nurture sequence says, are you you know? Are You an entrepreneur that just launched your business in the last two years? Have you had your business for five years or more, or do you currently work for someone else and you're just looking, you know, to start your own business? Some day in the future and by clicking one of those he can now he can now tailor his kind of nurture experience based on those personas. Is that is that kind of what you're referring to there? That that style of contextualization? Yeah, that's absolutely one way we we called that the chooser own adventures email. You know, it's sort of elicits a response. That helps segment them. There's also, though, you know, ways to segment them that are not elicited by...

...us. And just which pages are you traveling to between? You know which page you initially landed on. Is Actually tells you a lot about the intent of the user. Got It. So pulling all those data points, which there can be thousands of them, and sort of scoring them and using really thought through leads burn to build sort of intent profiles for different types of users. That's really what helps guide the contextual experience of it. Eric, this has been fantastic. His idea of keeping the human touch as you scale with your marketing technology, I think, is so huge. I think it should impact everything. We're talking to other humans. We're not talking to numbers in our marketing automation platform, and so I love that you've shined a light on this idea. If there's somebody listening, they want to stay connected with you. They want to learn more about hup spot academy. What's the best way for them to go about doing that? They can find me on twitter at...

Eric Eater Zero, and they can find type spot academy at at Hub Spot Academy on Twitter or academy that up spot Bo. Love it awesome, Erica. Thank you so much for your time to demand. This has been fantastic. Thank you. To ensure that you never miss an episode of the BETOB growth show, subscribe to the show in Itunes or your favorite podcast player. This guarantees that every episode will get delivered directly to your device. If you'd like to connect with Bob Executives from all over the world, make sure to join our private facebook community. There are some incredible conversations happening inside this group. To Join, visit be toob growth showcom FB. Thank you so much for listening. UNTIL NEXT DON.

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