547: A Proven Strategy That B2B Marketers Need to Implement w/ Steve Pratt

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Steve Pratt, Partner at Pacific Content.

A relationship with the right referral partnercould be a game changer for any be to be company. So what ifyou could reverse engineer these relationships at a moment's notice, start a podcast,invite potential referral partners to be guests on your show and grow your referral networkfaster than ever? Learn more. At Sweet Fish Mediacom you're listening to thebe tob growth show, a podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieveexplosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources,you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green.Let's get into the show. All right. I am here today with Steve Pratt, is the cofounder, one of the CO founders, at Pacific content. Steve, how you doing today? I'm good. So, Steve,we've talked. We've had you. I think we had you on BB growtha while back. We've also talked to you one of our summits that wedid earlier in the year. So you and I have have jammed on thetopic of podcasting a few different times. We're here at marketing PROPS EVENT BETOB marketing for him and you just did a talk on really questions that brandsshould be asking about podcasting that they're not asking, and I was I wasin the session. I thought you and in your Client Dell, the marketingdirector for Del did a phenomenal job of presenting the upside to podcasting. But, as we were talking right before we hit record on this, just reallyinterested at you know, with us being a PODCAST agency specifically selling to beto be marketers, we've just seen a lot of pushback in selling to theCMO or VP of marketing and a BB company. They just seem to notreally get why they should be doing podcasting. You guys felt not just exclusively tobe rebrands, but you have some...

...betb companies that that are leveraging podcastingand seeing results and you had some really interesting ideas on why more beatb marketersaren't embracing the medium. I'd love for you to just kind of unpack thosefor us. Yeah, sure, I think there's a few. I meanone, the type of podcast that we do is designed to be kind ofa like like a show. It's an original show. It's not really designedto be a piece of marketing and it's not meant to talk about your productsand services overtly. Most people don't want to download infommercials. So in away it's at that top of funnel brand level when you do it right,and if you're a company that wants to do brand level, you know marketing, you will be hard pressed to find a better medium than doing an originalpodcast. I think most people in they think, but a podcast, wantshort term business results. They want something in the next quarter. It's somany people asking me, well, do people give me their email address todownload the podcast just because there's a lack of education or what podcasting is?And so if that's the question you're asking me, then clearly your want,like to your point, you're wanting that short term result. You want theemail address so you can nurture them to and you went and direct response advertising, in other podcast is a great way to do that. Like there's youknow, you can just look at the advertisers in the podcasting space. There'sa ton of direct response advertisers. They would not be staying there if itwasn't driving results for them. Yep, but actually creating your own podcast,I think, is way further up the funnel and I think that probably discouragessome people from getting into the space. I think also there's you know,there's so much talk about video in the BB marketing space right now that audiokind of gets overshadowed. And you know, way, I totally get it.Like video works really, really well On facebook or, you know,going live on instagram or Snapchat, which is interesting, though, because wouldbe to be you don't see a lot...

...of B tob marketers talking about facebook, snapchat, instagram, yet they are all talking about video. Yes,yeah, and so you had mentioned you had a really great explanation around it'sso white hot now that you mentioned earlier, like audios just kind of getting passedover, which I totally agree with. Gary v seems to be the onlyguy that's really saying audio is where you absolutely need to be a Lexivoice podcasting, because you can do it passively. That's how I consume content, like we were talking, we were talking before, like you're in thecar, you're driving, like you're producing twenty five minute shows, because theaverage commute is twenty six minutes. So you know some of the numbers youwere sharing earlier. Yeah, I'm like like everything else, like video likethis is obvious. But is a screen based medium. Yeah, and there'sso much videos that. I'm not disputing the videos a great tool, butthere's so much video out there and it is tied to being on a screenall the time. It's a really competitive space, like you've got to makereally fantastic video content to be able to stand out and and get noticed inthat space. Audio is and is a non screen based medium. It there'sno competition for it. When you're driving a car, when you're working out, when you're walking your dog, when you're cooking dinner, all the thingswhen you cannot look at a screen. Yeah, and you know, ifyou think about the amount of time that somebody might spend watching a video aboutB to be, it's probably a couple minutes tops. Right podcasts, whenyou do it right, you know people will listen for twenty five minutes.If you tell a great story and you do a great job and it's compelling, valuable content, you've got an amazing opportunity to captivate and really engage anaudience at a different level. And you know as a brand, when youstart really thinking like okay, I can get into a less crowded channel.If I make a fantastic show, there's...

...an opportunity to cut through much moreeasily than there is in the video side. And would I like to actually havemy brand voice come to life in an actual voice and have it insidesomebody's ears for half an hour every week or two or daily or whatever publishingschedule is. It's a remarkably compelling space for brands. I just don't thinkthat all of them fully understand what the opportunity is yet. So wanting shortterm results being one reason that bb markers aren't you seemingly are not embracing podcastinglike they should be. Video being so white hot and everybody being focused onvideo that audios just kind of getting swoket under the rug. One thing thatyou mentioned is the way that delves. Show that you guys produce is calledTrailblazers, and Walter Isaacs in, the guy that wrote the Steve Jobs biography, hosts that show, which is incredible. I've been a subscriber to that showand love the content. But they in episode two, I think youguys said, you did a story about the guy that basically invented the digitalcamera. He worked for Kodak presented it to executives there and they essentially putpoothe idea like no, like this, this looks weird, like and thendoesn't look as good as being able to take them to the Photoshop and printthem out. You no value and in this digital camera thing. And intwenty years later they're out of business because they didn't you take it out ofbusiness. Bi digital cameras on a technology they were literally sitting on kind ofand as fascinating, you know, on you know, hearing the real perspectivesof the person who invented the camera, but also of CODAC executives are like, I know it sounds dumb now, but in a hime sight when youwere there, like it. You know, it's a very different story. Howkind of get dunked into this. So all that to say, youknow that specific episode Dell had a communication plan specifically for that episode with Instagram, tapping into a lot of different photography hashtags. And the third point thatI took away in our kind of our...

...pre conversation it's just thinking about distribution. They, you know, Dell originally went into it thinking cxos or who. You know this this. So we need to have content that directly correlatesto a CX Oh, but there are adjacent topics also over the pans,all over the place, that the sex, those are interest humans. Yeah,right, and so I think not thinking widely enough about what you weretarget buyer is actually interested in and thinking and they're actually a lot of reallycompelling ideas that we can build a show around that aren't necessarily directly about itsecurity, that we could get an IP security executive that we want to buyour BB product to buy by producing a compelling show about a bigger idea.I guess sounds like like the trailblazer show is designed for cxos who are notsure about how to deal with all the digital disruption in their industry. They'reworried that, like, you know, what is going to be the Uberof our industry that comes along and disrupts us? Yeah, so dell technologiesis this relatively new brand that's kind of been created by the merger of DellanAMC. They've got a suite of companies that are experts in digital transformation,but it's a new company. So they want to associate their company and justlet people know this. This group of you know, senior sea sweet executives, but that's what they stand for. Every episode is the story of adifferent industry being disrupted and where the innovation comes from and going inside those storiesof the people who were there. It opens up to being able to saywe're going to do one about the car industry, we're going to do oneabout the music industry, about healthcare or finance industries or that you know likemovies, music, photography, you know, things that are you know a lotof people would be interested in, but at the core of it istheir stories of innovation and disruption and how people dealt with it. When youtake that little bit of a distance around, like we're going to tell stories withthe theme, but the actual individual...

...stories can be very different, allof a sudden you got a very broadly appear appealing show that people get whatyou stand for without having to tell them overtly about it. Like, youknow, just when you're talking about it security, we're doing a show withmacafee and you know you probably have conceptions about what their brand is based ontheir history in there. They have some really seriously deep expertise in cybersecurity andyou know one of the hottest topics and current events in the last couple ofyears has been hackers and cybersecurity. The obvious path to what a show formacafee would be. Well, let's get some cybersecurity experts to sit down andtalk and tell people the information they need to know to protect themselves in thisera of hacking and leaks and all these sorts of things. Right, theleap that we kind of took to find that gap was let's create a firmatthat gives you that information but is actually telling stories that are interesting to listento. So the format is more like mythbusters for Cybersecurity, where will takesomething that you may have seen in a movie or TV show that involves hackingand say like, well, how hard is that to do in the reallife? Like it? Should I really be worried about somebody taking over myWebcam? Should I really be worried about using Public Wifi? I you know, is there any risk that somebody's really going to hack my car? Andwe actually go and get real hackers to go do that to our host andso he gets hacked all the time. It's great, but you know,suddenly you take something that may not be something you're like, I would liketo sign up and listen to a cyber security podcast. Is something that like, I like. Honestly, tons and tons of people are listening to thisshow. Yeah, and it's created by McAfee and a lot of their targetmarket. Yeah, and it's giving people the information that they need to know, but it's telling it's giving it to them in a way that they're reallyenjoy getting information. Yeah, and talk about it and you know, we'reyou know, whether it's the Dell show,...

...the trailblazer show or the macafee show, a bunch of them now, like the audience reaction is treating itlike a real show, and I think that's the big opportunity that most marketersdon't understand is that like be to be you're you're still talking to real peoplewho are going to make decisions, but you gotta there has to be alevel of entertainment and and quality in the programming you're creating, because you're competingwith all their spare time and you know they're it's like, well, Icould listen to this American life or I could listen to my playlist of favoritemusic on spotify, rightelist cat video, yeah, or I could listen toa BB podcast. So the BB podcast better be pretty, pretty great ifyou're competing with that stuff. I just think that that's maybe the hurdle peoplehaven't been able to get over as like, what is our show that's going tobe able to have that impact and you know, or even having considerthat that's a possibility. Yeah, so we another thing you talked about inyour talk was measurement and how brands should think about measuring the success of theshow. You and I are similar in that that you know, most peoplethink, Oh, you measure it in downloads. You and I both agreethat that's that's actually not the first thing you should be looking at. Talkto us about how you think brands should be looking at measurement. Yeah,I mean, I I we always start when we're when we're working with aclient, to say like, you know, why do you want to make apodcast, like what are the what are the reasons that that you're talkingto us about this? What are the important business goals you're trying to achieveand what would success actually look like for you? Almost nobody says like well, I'd like a million downloads and that's it right, like they're like,well, we have a business problem or trying to solve. So again,just use the duel example. It's there a relatively new brand and they wantto establish themselves as experts and digital transformation to see EXOS. So fundamentally it'sa brand awareness and positioning problem to solve...

...and we have three big areas ofmeasurements. So the first one is at the brand level, like are youactually letting more people know who you are and what you stand for, andare they getting it? The second one is the audience reaction, like whatare people liking the show? Are they talking about it? Are you gettingkind of the sentiment and the engagement levels that you want with the show?And then the last one is consumption, because it the consumption obviously matters,like how many downloads you're getting, how many subscribers you have, but that'smore a measure of the success of you're reaching your target audience. Is somethingthat they really enjoy doing. Yeah, we've been really lucky to find aan audience research partner, that a company called audience in sights in Toronto thathas done a huge amount of audio testing with audiences in the past and they'vebeen doing a lot more podcasting work with us to be able to actually getpanels of the target audience for the show's have them listen to a show ortwo, fillow to survey and the results are pretty like surprisingly awesome. Likethe brand recall is like, you know, aided and unaided is usually in theseventy two, eight, you know, high eighty percent range. That onthe Dell survey it was like over ninety percent of them learn something new, loved or like the show and would tell somebody else about it. Andthe brand favorability for all went up like eighty two basis points or something likethat from listening to the show and people like directly connected. I understand Delltechnologies stands for innovation and transformation and after listening to this show, that isa bigger success than the number of downloads, even though the downloads have been farbeyond anybody's expectation. But I think it's really like, are you actuallyconnecting, you know, the goals of the show with the audience and whatthey're taking away from it? I love it, stee. This has beenawesome. If somebody listening to this wants to stay connected with you, theywant to learn more about Pacific content.

How can they go about doing that? Because of a contentcoms it is the best way. And then you're onLinkedin. Yeah, I'm on Linkedin twitter at Steve Pratt's sea. I'm nota chartered account and there was some I'm from Canada. If you can't tellfrom my user accent, it has something to do with a Canadian thing ofSteve Patsy. Yes, love it. awesviously. Thank you so much foryour time, Kah. Thanks, James, it's always a pleasure talking. Ifyou're a be tob markeeter, we want to feature you on sites likeUffington Post, social media examiner and chief marketer. Every week we send outa question related to be to be marketing. We use the responses to those questionsto fuel the content we write for really popular websites. So head overto sweet fish MEDIACOM backslash questions and sign up today. Thank you so muchfor listening. Until next time,.

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