539: These 4 Interview Questions Will Help You Find the Best Talent w/ Adam Robinson

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Adam Robinson, CEO at Hireology.

Are you struggling to come up withoriginal content, weaken and weak out start a boncast interview, your idealclients? Let them talk about what they care about most and never run out ofcontent ideas again learn more at sweetfish media dotcom. You were listening to the beatof egross show pottast dedicated to Helpi bee to be executive, achieve explosivegrowth, whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools andresources. You've come to the right place, I'm Jane's Carburry and I'mJonathan Green. Let's get into the show, welcome back to the beautby growth show.We are here today with Adam Robinson Heis, the CEO at Hierology, and he'salso the author of the Best Team Winds Adam. How you doing today doing greatthanks for having me on. ' I'm really cinted to Chot with you today Adamwe're going to be talking about interview questions today, but underthe scope of something a little bit bigger, really what you call the foursuperelements that we need to be looking for, as we are growing ourteams, and so obviously you know. We all know that the talent that you bringinto your organization is seed factor in the success that the organization isgoing to experience, and so, as we were talking about these four suberelementsoffline, I just think they're going to be extremely valuable for the marketingleaders. Listening to this, that are tat, are growing their teams, butbefore we do that, I'd love to give some contexts as to why you're the guyto be talking about this. Can you tell us a little bit about what you and yourteam are up to at hierology? Sure thing: Hierology is a talent technologyplatform that helps entrepreneur, lead businesses and operators be great atthe people's side of their business. So we provide a platform available on aMONTHLYS subscription basis that gives you everything you need from the hostedcareer site, Tho Connection to applicants to the interview guides tothe drug ond background screening tasks,...

...assessments on boarding, payrolleverything you need to be good at hiring and retention, we're a hundredand thirty employee business based in Chicago on a steep growth trajectoryand hanging on for dear life. I love it. I love it out of so withthaut beingsaid. We've got a lot to cover today, so I'd love to dive in to these four,what you call super elements and if you could start by giving us just kind of ahigh level understanding. How did you come about developing these? Well, weat Hier Allegi, started off modelling, sixty seven competencies. We call theelements of success so when we were building our product, we spent twoyears in the market interviewing hundreds and hundreds of performers atvarious roles at at companies in and around Chicago in the Midwest, and whatwe found where there were sixty seven competencies, some of which wereuniversal, meaning they were always predictive, some of which were veriable,meaning depending on the job. Sometimes they were predictive and w. We linkedthose up in an algorithm and and regression tested interview, questionsand answers that we had written to determine whether or not they werepresent and when we did that what we found James was. There were four ofthese elements that were so highly predictive, so highly predictive thatfor any role for any job for any applicant. These are the things youshould ask if nothing else, these are the things to look for, and we we tiedresearch to these validated them against our studies and and now werefer to them as the four super elements, and that's what we'll betalking about today. I love it all right. So, let's jump in to this firstsuperelement, it's it's about, or it is attitude. How do we assess attitude inan interview? Attitude first lets tofine. That attitude is a positivedisposition toward work. So not necessarily I like this job but more Ilike working and what the research...

...shows is that individuals with apositive disposition toward work are overwhelmingly more likely to be topcortil performers in any role and that's intuitive right. If, if you likeworking you're more likely to be good at what you're doing because you'reenjoying it right, it's it's a you know a chicken or egg benefit right. I Ilike working so I'm better at my job and vice versa. So some otherinteresting research, James on identical twins, separated at birth,help and form workplace attitude and whether or not it's it's learned oracquired, and so the Universiy of Minnesota over twenty year periodlooked at identical, twins separated at birth. They H'd never met each otherand they followed them into their adult lives from childhood, and the resultswere really cool but as as far as workplace attitude goes, but theresearchers found was it didn't matter whether these twins, who who had nevermet, were blue in blue collar or whitecollar jobs. Whether one was married, the other was divorced. Kids, no kids,high school drop out PhD, you know, lived in Phoenix, lived in Boston, itdidn't matter identical twins, separated at birth report,statistically identical levels of job satisfaction, and so what that suggestsit doesn't prove it strongly suggests is that your attitude towards work ismost likely hard, wired and not acquired so said, even even th. Morebasically, the person walking around your office with a rain cloud overtheir head might have some good days but they're genetically predisposed tohave more bad days than good days, and if you buy that research- and you also believethat the the metal research that shows that better attitude leads to betterperformance shouldn't, we be screening for attitude in every interview. Theanswer is yes, of course, and here's the question. The question you ask istell me about the last time you were so frustrated at work that you wanted toquit right and for lots of people that...

...could be today. I mean you never know,but that's not what's important. What's important is the follow of question asit will be. With all of these questions we talk about why what was going on andsomeone with a positive disposition toward work will go out of their waymost times to put to use positive language, but a positive spen on anegative or frustrating situation, and so you know for anyone. That's everbeen in an n interview. I know you've heard an answer like this h. here's theexample of an answer you want to hear. Yes, this was incredibly frustratingthe situation was frustrating and the fact that it kept happening is reallywhy I'm leaving. But honestly, these folks gave me my start. They taught methis business, they taught me everything. I know about marketing andI I'm grateful to them for the opportunity. It's just time for me tomove on all right. There's an example, James of a good question or a goodanswer to you know with a positive spind on a frustrating situation.HERE'S THE ANSWER! You don't want to hear those people they like folks onfire at that agency that places a mess that guy couldn't manage anythingthey're terrible. I cannot wait til leave that place right. That wouldthat's an example of a poorer attitude towards the workplaceare working, and my suggestion is that you just pass immediately because t thelikelihood of them not being a top performer just went way way up got it.That's that's incredible insight and it makes it makes absolute sense when you,when you explain it n the story with identical twins and being. I would havenever expected that to be a genetic thing I would have just assumed it wasa alearned behavior. So this second super element, Atam that we're going tobe talking about is accountability. How do we assess that? Well? This is thefancy psychology term for accountability is, what's called thelocusts of control and it's the degree to which an individual believes thatthe things that happen in their life are a result of their own actions ordecisions or the actions of others. So...

...you can have an internal locus ofcontrol, which means the things that happen in your life are a result ofthings you did or didn't do, or an external locust, which means it'sthings happen to you right and someone with an internal locust of control isforty, four zero percent, more likely to be a top cortile performer accordingto the research. No here's the question: When was the last time you set anaggressive goal for yourself, but did not achieve it, and the person willlook at you like you're, trying to trick them or get them to admit afailure, and so you might have to put them at ease with saying something likelisten. We all set aggressive goals. I've missed goals before I'd like totalk about the last time you didn't quite get there. You know when did thathappen and someone will say well, you know I I set a a target, for you know,pipeline contributions in dollar terms, and I didn't quite get there, and sothat's not what's important. What's important is follow up what happened?Someone with an internal locus of control. Well, tell you all of thethings they did or didn't do that resulted in that miss they'll saysomething like I should would have done a better job, understanding theresources required or the time required to hit that Gal I'll do a better job.Next time, someone with an external locus of control will say the following:They did not give me what I needed to hit the goal they set the goal too high.I did not have what was required to to meet that target. Basically, it's notmy fault and you can ask th s these questions about ownership of goals andpeople are literally one or the other they're, not there's no gray area here,you're, not somewhat accountable, you're, either accountable or you're,not wit. The research shows is that that locus of control is burned in toan individual or very, very early in life nd, so you're either one or theother. I would pass on someone that assigns blame for failure. That's justnot someone I'm going to want in the organization if nothing else because ofresearch shows they're forty percent...

...less likely to be a top performer. Iwant to build the best team. I think the best team wins the market, I'm notgoing to hire someone who doesn't have a chance of being an a player on mybest team, that's fantastic! So we've we've now covered attitude. We'vecovered accountability. Now we're going to talk about prior related job success,talk to us about this one Adam. So this is the resume. So what we find in ourresearch is fifty percent of the factors that predict a person's successin the role it has is nothing to do with their experience. This is the onearea where it is predictive, but it's not what you think it has nothing to do with whether ornot they've done the job you're asking them to do before. Although withcertain vocation or hard skill focused roles, that's going to be importantright. You either know how to fix a diesel engine or you don't. You eitherknow how to writ and react framework as an engineer or you don't right, but youcan learn those skills. You cannot learn this particular aspect right.What's it predictive is whether or not you've ever been managed closely? Topperformers are tend to have been managed closely in prior related jobs,and so here's the question when you go home at the end of the day or a week or quarter depending on theroll. When you go home at the end of the day, how do you know you had a goodday? Someone who's been managed closely.Will answer that question with a number so they'll say something like at theend of the day, if I was able to generate fifteen warm inbound,qualified leads through digital means. That was a good day verses. If Igenerated some leads. That was a good day. Well, how many? Well as long as Igenerated leads, I was in a good spot right versus I needed to hit fifteenevery day if I didn't hit fifteen, that was, that was not a great day for me anand the difference is important,...

...because, if you're trying to build ahigh performance organization, you know if you're running a business, that'smetrics, driven an and with the research shows the best businesses areoperationally sound and run based on K pis. If I'm running a business based onKpis, the metrics or outcomes, do I want to hire someone who's, never beensuccessful in an environment where they're going to be managed to outcomes?The answer is no. Not if I'm looking to minimize my chance of having bad hires,I want to make sure someone can thrive in that environment. So someone thatknows a number that's required for them to have that good day. Good Week, goodmonth. That's someone! That's got the best chance of being successful work inin that kind of environment. So so that's the prior related job success.Okay, and- and would you say the person that maybe hasn't been inthat environment before? Is there any data around you KN W? Ifthey haven't been in that in that environment before is there a point intheir career, where there's kind of like no looking back and if you haven'tbeen in that type of environment by you know x age, the likeihood of you beingable to adapt to that style of management? Is Unlikely or or should you just shy awayfrom folks that have never experienced that before? Well? T's such a goodquestion. I unfortunately don't have that to answer your first question, butbut what I can tell you is, as a person goes through their career, they develophabits and an approach to the work and someone that thrives in an environmentwhere they're not managed very closely. That doesn't mean they're a bademployee, the contrary to that they they're they're, fantastic employee inan environment where management is very light, so for anyone out there listingthat's, you know Selt, aware of their management style and thinking well,look I just need people that coan figure it out, because I'm just reallynot into this management thing. That's that's good right, but for someone whoaspires to build an operationally sound business and I can think of no otherbusiness that requires more KPI focusd...

...than than marketing digital, a Dmarketing and advertising I mean it's. The business is metrix right, so sopeople that don't like being managed to metric might not be a great fit, and inthis industry you see that all the time when you're trying to take creativesand and have them accountable for output. You know that's generally,where you see this friction or conflict, and so, if I'm hiring creatives into anenvironment where they're going to be accountable for outcomes, I really wantto pay attention to this one. This is a big one, and this is the reason why somany people from a creative background, when put you know on and up in anoperating roller and a management role of other creatives, where there'sschedules and and metrics to hit fail so frequently because they haven't beenscreened for these things. This last one that we're going to talk about Adamis culture fit talk to us about this one. This is a gray area and you haveto be really careful here, because this is how you end up in court. So it's thedegree to which the person shares the workstyle and workplace tendencies ofthe broader team in your organization. Right so do they do the work. The waywe do the work do have they been successful, using the same systems thatwe use a, and so this is important in entrepreneur or leor early stagecompanies, because the impetus is all is the entrepreneur and I've been there.Many times is to go hire the person from the big company to come work inyour little company, 'cause they're, going to teach you how you do it well,what makes someone successful at that? Bigger Agency is not what's going tomake them successful at your fledgling agency. Wut Make someone successful ata big organization, is structure in tools and process and pricing power andin breadth of team in in roll specialization in the customer baseright, someone can operate in that environment. What makesomeonesuccessful in a start up or entrepreneur led environment is thefact that they can be a utility player...

...that they can focus on nineteen thingsat the same time and keep all the plates spinning right, Inso,understanding, which environment somebody can be more successful and isreally critical, and I would just ask the following question: What isrequired from a tool's or processed standpoint for you to be successfulhere in this role that we're discussing? Tell me how you have achieved successin prior wolls? What systems have you used? What process he said you followedand someone that worked at the big company is going to rattle off athousand different things: someone that's an entrepreneur or or comes trouan entrepreneurial background, or a start up company will tend to say wejust figured things out. Neither of those are bad answers, but there arebetter answers depending on the kind of business you're running, and so the keyhere for your listeners is to just be self aware of the kind of companyyou're, running n and target people who have been successful in that kind ofenvironment. In the past, okay, and so does that buck against the prior superelement of the prior related job success. Where we're looking forsomeone who has been managed to those metrics, is there ever any conflictbetween that and the fourth superelment? Well, there can be, but here's the n.You know the the example of someone who's had their metric known and manage,but has had no system or process to follow hut. The example of I'm workingfor the sit Yo of the start up and the Sito says to me Eyman every week. Ineed you to produce x dollars in addressable pipeline for the salesorganization. Go find me thirty grand a week of warm leads. Well. How do I dothat? I don't know man figure it out, so I knew I was acpauntable for thirtygrand a week of leads. I had no idea how to do it. I had to figure it out. Ihad to wing it. You know fly by the seat of my pants, so I could be bothmanaged to a number and also have zero process. internaltly to follow andeadjust have to wing it right. So there's an example where you could beboth of those things got it: okay, Ilove it Adam. This has been fantastic,andcredibly helpful. For me. I know our listeners are going to get a ton ofvalue out of it as well. If somebody...

...wants to stay connected with you,what's the best way for them to to do that, and then also how can they learnmore about hierology and whore an they find your book yea? So you can learnmore about the best team wins the the book ive published, which is all aboutteam building h on Amazon or at my website, at ww, w dot the best teamwinds, Dotcom we've got an audible version of kindlversion gitdlefashioned hard copy, my podcast by the same name, the best team wins, is on Um Apple, podcast or Google play, or youcan find out more about hierology at H. I R E O l, O Gy hierology dot com, Lova,Awesome Adam! Thank you so much foryour time today. This is been incredible.Thanks for having BEONCA RWE want to feture you on sites likethe Huckington Post, Sofal me DA examine our an chief worer. Every weekwe seen that a question really inbetobe marketing. We use the responses tothose questions to feel the content. We write for really popular websites sohead over to sweet bish me de tcom, slash questions and sign up today.Thank you so much for listening until next time.

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