538: Creating a Demand Generation Strategy for a Skeptical Buyer w/ Bethany Walsh

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Bethany Walsh, VP Marketing at Abacus.

Wouldn't it be nice to have severalthought: Leaders in your industry, Kno and love your brand start a podcast,invite your industries thought leaders to be guests on your show and startreaping the benefits of having a network full of industry. influencerslearn more at sweetfish media DOTCOM, Drou. Listening to the B Theb groteshow podcast dedicated to helping B to B executives, achief explosive grownwhen you're looking for techniques and strategies, O tools and resources.You've come to the right place, I'm Jonathan Green and I'm James Carburry.Let's get I into the show bawelcome back to the beatby growthshow. We are here today with Bethany Walsh, she's, the VP of marketing atAbecus Bethany, how you doing iday great great thanks Yong for having meI'm excited to chat with you today, Bethny we're going to be talking aboutcreating a demand generation strategy for a sceptical buyer. This isdefinitely a topic that we have not covered before. So I I reallyappreciate the granularity as you were. You know thinking through the the topicthat we should cover. I think this is going to be supervaluable, but beforewe get into that, you you've got D of a three part approach for creating thisdimengion strategy before we get to that, tell us a little bit about Abicusto what you and your team are up to over there yeah. So Abacus is reallythe first real time. EXSPENCH reporting cot form. So basically, with that mowis we remove the traditional expense report from the process of submittingexpenses, and instead the platform relies on due to points andintegrations to help employs submit expenses as they occur, and then itsort of automatically sorts and organizes them into what we call livereports, which makes it really easy for finance teams to review and prove them.So we're really. You know my team is focused on selling into the financedepartment at you know midsize companies, and so this is really atopic that it's something we've had to...

...think long and hard about and reallysort of, Um try to find different ways to you know bueld relationships withthis buyer. No, that that makes perfect sense. I I think H, finance- and I T II would imagine are- are probably some of the most skeptical buyers. Just bythe nature of you know, th the type of products are needing to buy in theimpact that they ow this great significance that those products haveon the organization as a whole from a security standpoint, obviouslyfinanceis hued so to to die right in Bethany understanding. Now a little bitof context as to why this this is something that you're, particularlyskilled in you guys have done a lot of thinking around this idea. Um, let'sstart by talking about wha, what do you think makes the buyer skeptical yeah? I mean s. Thefirst thing I would say is skeptical, isn't necessarily bad right. You know,like you said, I t finance legal departments. You know these teams, theycarry a lot of responsibility and sort of the you know the weight of thebusiness on their shoulders, and so their job is to be really diligent. Youknow if they're going to buy a piece of software, or you know some sort ofservice that goes into their process and is going Ta. You know touch thesereally important pieces of data. They want to make sure that it's stable thatit's going to be around for a while M and so they're gonna. You know they'rereally going to do their homework and by that nature, in order t to be reallybias and do your diligence you have to. You have to be a little sceptical andyou have to ask a lot of questions you know, so I think that they can't affordto sort of misstep or fail because they have these big consequences. That wouldcome out of that. So I think the first thing you know asa marketer to realize is just because they're skeptical itdoesn't. It doesn't mean that it's it's bador. You know hurtful to the buyingprocess. I think it. It just means that...

...you're really going to want to helpthem do their homework and sor take a different approach to them, and I Ilike that idea of of reframing the way that we look at someone who's skeptical.You know your buyer's, really diligent and so looking at it from theperspective of Oka. If you have a very diligent buyer, then you have lots ofopportunities to. You know, provide content context to them that can allowthem to do that DU diligence. So I I love the way you've thought about itthere this this next point that we're going to talk about dethany. You saidthey won't buy from you if they don't trust you. This is something thatobviously we've talked about a lot on the show, the importance of trust, buttalk to US talk to us a little bit about this. Yes, I mean, I think, thatUm, just in general buyers, today, there'sso many options that trust is becoming more important, um in the buyingprocess as a whole, but I think especially for a sceptical buyer. Youknow that trust is sort of the foundation of the buying process to anextent that is a little bit deeper. You know, and I think that for them, it'sreally they want that proof and they need that proof, and so, as you know,as a marketer, it's something that you have to instill across the wholeorganization, because you have to be genuine and you have to do what Yo,what you say, you're going to do, and so, if you say that your product can dosomething, you know they'll see through the exaggerations and when they dotheir homework and they do their digging. You know they'll find outwhether or not you know you're going to be able to follow through. But thegreat thing is: Is that once they trust you they're going to stick with you,because you know it's, this: Isn't a buyer that wants to go and shop arounda lot. You know they they're risk anverse, they don't want to Um. Youknow, keep trying things out. They they...

...want to find something that works andthey want to stick with it. So if they trust you enough to buy from you,they're really going to stick with you and they they want to build thatrelationship. So I think about it, as you know, really as an opportunity. Ithink that you know building that sort ofrelationship can lead to even you know more sorbenefits down the road in termsof them being there for you, when you need to help Bild trust with anotherprospect. You know in terms of referrals or reference falls oranything like that, but it is. It is really important. Youknow, they're, not gonna they're, not going to step lightly into into thiskind of you know, buying software or O know buying your service or whatever.It is so that, and they want to make sure that they're not going to have to do sort ofa rik and replace they don't want to. You know, instell something and thenhave it not work out. So so trust is, is pretty much the key in thefoundation to the whole process being a success. So with that being said, kindof laying the groundwork of understanding that that trust isabsolutely essential, a essential part of this equation, W I'd love to close on talking aboutsome practical tactics that y o th the folks listening to this can start toemploy to to build that trust. Yeah I mean youknow, tactics are really hard and and they'rereally you know it. It varies for industry and you know exactly whatyou're selling and things like that, but you know there's some things thatyou're going to know about your sceptical byer right, like they're,going to want to do their homework, and so the first place that that alwaysstarts today. Is You know you go to your search engine and you type in y?What is it that you're looking for? Well, these buyers oftentimes havereally specific questions so focusing...

...on those long, Taie key words, the morespecific you can get and the closer to answering that exact question you canget. The more sort of points are going to earn with them, because they'rereally going to think that you understand their situation and that you understand the problemsthat they're trying to to solve, and so they're not Goinna go into this with someone that theythink doesn't understand or speak their language. So you know focusing reallyknowing what those long tale keywords are. You know what exactly people areare searching for is superimportant and it's definitely an investment to makeand when that sort of comes that trust aspect again and being genuine, youcan't just put up url with the exact phrase in it andthen put something else on the page like you really need to dive into thatspecific problem on the page, and you know show them that you can offer asolution to that. I think the other thing that Um you know we've started tofocus on is third party validation, so reviews and Atlis things, and you knowgetting your current customers t you know publicly participate in thatvalidation is really important. You know don't be afraid of of asking forreviews and if you're, if you're falling through and n your you knowdoing what you said you were going to do. It shouldn't be hard to ask forreviews, and you know H, shouldn't be something that you worry about and thenthe other thing that you know is really great for validation. Is You knowfinding other companies, or you know, solutionsthat you can partner with that are brands that they already trust? What dothese partnerships look like Bethany, that one's that was super interestingto me yeah. So you know our software is sort of a piece of the accounting stack,and so when we came into the market, when we integrated with differentaccounting platforms, you know netsweet...

...intact. We took advantage of those partnershipsand really, you know, aligned ourselves with their customer base, and you knowgoing to those events and and being a good partner with them sort of showstheir audience that you know we have angevity that we are a legitimatecompany and you know we take this seriously, and so that was really whathelped us build start to build a relationship with that with theircustomer base. So taking advantage of those sort of codbranding, you knowmarketing opportunity. touses super super important. Yet another way to dothat is through content. You know doing webenars or ebuks with existing Um. Youknow vendors that they already trust is a great way to start to get them to get them exposure. To your point ofview, I did that I' I've done that a coupleof times so far this year with two different virtual summits that weplanned. Where we've had you know companies that were much larger than us.You know partner with us to to put on the event and obviously we're Kno we'reseen as a partner with these large brands. Putting putting out this. Youknow piece of content in in the form of a virtual summit, and so I think yourspot on that we got to absorb the trust that our buyers have in these othercompanies because we're putting on it ve with them, so that that makes totalsense. Another another thing that you had mentioned is we were you knowtalking through this offline? You mention the importance of segmentation.Can you talk to us a little bit about that a and why that's really importantto Hong in on here, yeah, absolutely Um. You know finance seems in particular. We foundvery so much and they'r sort of...

...processies vary so much, and so youknow, there's some commonalities and some trends that you can find Um,whether it's by segmenting by vertical by company, size, Um, you know by fordollars that they've raised Um, there's a lot of different ways to sort of lookat your audience, but figuring out what makes theirsituation different from someone else's really helps. You have a betterconversation with them. You know it. KINDOF goes back to thoselong tail keywords. You kno somebody from a you know: Twenty Person, TechCompany in the finance team is probably trying to solve a different problemthan somebody from a five hundred person consultant agency. You know sounderstanding those different use cases is is really also going to help youbuild that trust, 'cause w. You know what you're talking about and you'vebeen through, that with other customers. That makes a big difference reallyappreciate you sharing that peace spephany this this entire strategy, thethe method that you've used to create this demand Yourin strategy,particularly for for someone with the sceptical buyer, I think, is supersuper helpful. It's definitely like I said earlier, not something we'vetalked about on the show before so really pusuit. You sharing this. Ifthere's somebody listening that wants to stay connected with you, maybe theywant to dig deeper on this idea, maybe they're they have very skeptical buyersand and want a jam with you on some ideas. What's the best way for them tostay in contact with you and also how can they learn more about abecus yeah?Definitely so you can check is out a abecus dotcom or on twiter at abicus,pretty simple there. You can always get in touch with me through email, it'sjust bephany at Abecas, docom and my twitter handle is b a Barker, sodecoatly reach out. Let me know a few questions and I'd also love to hear youknow other people's methods as well. So awsomebethany will thank you so muchfreor time today. This has been fantastic or real appreciative thank Yo...

...to ensure that you never miss anepisode of the BB growth show subscribe to the show in Itunes or your favoritepot gass player. This guarantees that every episode will get delivereddirectly to your device. If you are someone you know would be an incredibleguess for the B to be groshew email me at Jonathan that sweetfish media Dotcom,let us know we love connecting, would be to be executives and we love sharingtheir wisdom and perspective with our audience. Thank you so much forlistening until next time.

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