527: 7 Steps Teams Can Take to Do Big Things w/ Craig Ross

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In this episode we talk to Craig Ross, CEO of Verus Global and Author of Do Big Things.

A relationship with the right referral partner could be a game changer for any be to be company. So what if you could reverse engineer these relationships at a moment's notice, start a podcast, invite potential referral partners to be guests on your show and grow your referral network faster than ever? Learn more at sweet fish Mediacom. You're listening to the be tob growth show, a podcast dedicated to helping be to be executives achieve explosive growth. Whether you're looking for techniques and strategies or tools and resources, you've come to the right place. I'm James Carberry and I'm Jonathan Green. Let's get into the show. Welcome back to the BB growth show. We are here today with Craig Ross. He is the CEO of varis global. He's also the author of the brand new book do big things. Craig, how you doing today? I'm doing well, James. Thank you. I am really excited to chat with you today, Craig. I heard you recently on a podcast that I'm a that I'm very religious listener of, and so excited to have you on our show. You've got a seven part framework that we're going to be digging into on really their steps that teams can take to mobilize hearts and minds and and really make an impact, and I'm excited to dig into that framework. Before we do, you actually wrote this book with two Co Authors, Angie Paconi and Victoria Roberts, and I would love for you to explain kind of the why? Why did the three of you decide to team up and write this book? Do big things to too big reasons, James. Number one, anything significant that's going to get done gets done through teams. You know, there is a ton of work out there, ton of really great material on how to be a better leader. And yet, in this Matrix, network connected world that we live and operate in now, everything, almost everything, I mean, can try to name one thing that's significant it's been achieved by mankind,...

...has really been done by one person. Now, perhaps there was a big idea, I mean steve jobs comes to mind, but yet there was a team behind steep jobs that delivery. So that's number one. That's the biggest reason why. But you know what, there's a there's a powerful why that underlies that is that because of based upon the research that we and others have done. There's so many people that are unfulfilled, their uninspired, they're they're they're actually diminished as human beings because of the teams that they're on and that that's just wrong. And so, over twenty five years, we step back and say, okay, what are the teams that are achieving big things doing and and are they making an epid impact where the people on the teams are as fulfilled as they can be? A Lot. That's what we wrote the fellow so so crag like I, like I mentioned earlier, you guys have developed the seven part framework and and I really excited to just dive right into it. The first piece of this framework, number one, is to commit to the human imperative. Can you explain to our listeners you know, what's involved in that piece? This first step resonates with nearly everybody we work with and it's because of this we've asked people, hundreds and hundreds of people, how many great teams you've been on, and the answer really hurts. It often people will say I've been a two or three great teams or the course of a thirty year career. That's ridiculous. Well, when we ask them, when you look back on those two or three great teams, describe how they're thinking and their actions, and James's amazing. We'll talk about we were all in and are hired and we had each other's backs. So what we've discovered is when they begin their work together, define what's important to do, to think and do together as human beings at the beginning stead of waiting until the end. And so the first step to doing big things is to commit to the human imperative, commit to the thinking and actions we know as a...

...team we're going to have to deliver the function with to do this big thing in front of us. And and I'm assuming, Craig, that that that commitment with companies that you've worked with in the past. Does that commitment happen, I'm assuming, in the onboarding process of when they joined the team in the first place? It should. James, I love that you bring it up because what'll often happen there is they'll put the and with the best of intentions, people say, Hey, here's our corporate values, here's here's the values that we have, and then there's just sort of acknowledgement that those things are important. But we're equipping leaders and teams to do is actually step back and say, well, what does it look like to think this way? How will we know we're functioning this way? What's the reward for functioning and behaving this way? And so we encourage that in that on boarding process people are taking even deeper hmm, got it, and so so having new employees commit to what you know, what you guys call this this human imperative from the start. There is really the best way to go there. It's the best way to go there and we encourage people to actually measure it as they move through the life cycle of their team, just like they'd measure other important initiatives. And and is that measurement happening? Just by asking people on the team? Yeah, Hey, how do you how do you feel like you're doing in this area, versus how do you feel like other people on the team are doing? That's I think that's one of the most powerful ways. How are we doing with the thinking and behaviors we defined up front? And number two, where and how can we get even better and our thinking and behaviors? So how are we doing and where can we get better? I love it this, this second part of the framework that we're going to talk about, Craig, is to embody success and leverage failure. Can you talk to us about this? One Good Front of mine is an astronauts. Was An astronauts. He for shuttle missions, captain of the endeavor in two thousand and two. And I asked them what I'm going to mean this, this guy, if you ever community to work with them, it's said on the platform at zero miles for hour, and you know literal with many of your...

...thousand five hundred miles for our mean this thing is crazy, tons of fuel every second or being burned. I asked them one time. I said, Mike, come on, tell the truth with earthly even scared me if this is crazy, and saying you're flying in space. He looked at me with this look of you know how he's made out of grant of anyways. He looked at me. He said trust the process. So tell me, and might be astronaut said, Craig, for everything we did there was always a process. So no matter what happened to us during space putting, you're traveling in space. No matter what happened, we always had a process. Can you talk about power thirteen? You remember that story? You know those guys were to land in the movement, but they couldn't make it, but we were able to be sure they could seek it a process getting back home. Well, what we found is that teams that succeed in delivering on our initiatives and their projects that they have in front of them is that they have a process for also that includes how they will think and act in certain situations so that they can function like a success, as if there are success at the beginning, instead of doing what most teams do, and that's wait until they're actually done with the project or their initiative and then acting like a success. Got It? Okay. So I love that piece of about about leaning, leaning on the process and having having faith and trust in the process. So I guess, from from someone who's leading the team, Craig, what does it look like to create the process that your entire team can lean on and of throughout that? How can you instill enough confidence in the process that that there, that you remove that fear? I love it. Let's take an example, working with a team in Texas, and we just we had just had this discussion facilitated this. As you know, most of us have good intentions as human beings. We have greatness within us. Yet one of the things that because people inherently believe that they'll higher for talent, James, as you know, and then when they get bad news, let's just say in...

...particular case, they learn from their their provider that they were not going to get the materials they needed to deliver, to to deliver the project that their customers waiting for, and so they, the leader of this team expected professionals, as as they got the information, to adapt accordingly, to be agile and the over there was a breakdown and communication someone who is responsible for suring the news, and it didn't happen. Well, as you know, as you know, that create a tremendous amount of swirl. Beteam called a heart attack team. They flat line before they reach the finish line instead of say hey, time out. What will we do as a team when we receive any news that considered would be considered as bad news? What are expectations as res relates to responding to quote unquote, failure? And so when we're encouraging teams to do is to outline their well wet their accountability reflex and and by doing that they actually then demonstrate and they set an expectation, a cultural norm for how they will handle bad news, how they will respond to failure. So it's actually part of that process for success that they can rely on. I love it correct this third part of the framework that we're going to talk about is choosing to contribute, activate and connect across the business. Talk to us about what this means. Yeah, you know, you listeners as they're delivering to their clients, their customers, other businesses and eagerness to deliver around growth. James, every one of their teams exports are telling us that they're making thirty five thou decisions that day. That's a lot. Yeah, and so, as we all know, we've means must make consistently if they're going to succeed. The first one person contributor, and the contribute decision is simply this. I choose to bring my best to this situation. Going to be working with team on the East Coast here next week and one of the things that critic talking about is they've have very subtly done to make it what we call the the, you know, contributor decision. This happens a lot of...

...organization, James, where I'll bring my best if if you bring your best or if I get it, get the breakfast, if the customer is treating us well. Yeah, there's all these conditions. The second, second decisions. Well, call the activated in that. That is simply I choose to bring out the best in others in this interaction. James, it's a crime that's so waiting for their weekends, waiting to do group things for humanity. Me, it's amazing, isn't that? We see people volunteering in their places of worshiping abroad, they're doing all these amazing, amazing things for humanity and then they go to work places and are part of just where? where? What? Wait? We don't have to do that. We have it within us. And the active activator decision is say I'm going to actually bring person this media on this phone. Call third decisions, that we call the connector decision, and that that is a team. Once they've made the meter decision and the activator decision and collectively we choose to partner across to deliver our shared objective so that we there's no boundary to our team. Our team isn't bound by function. Our team is bound by the mississation. So, Craig, this this fourth part of the framework is to exercise your barrier breaking authority. Talk to us about what this means. I love this one for a lot of reasons, because I love law. I see, you know, we could have keynotes him well, have thousand people in a room, and I love asking that question. Stands into the most part. Would you please raise your hand it for the most part, you believe that everybody in this I is goodness within them, actually has a desire to do good things, to be great, to be fulfilled, and so one of the things that we found is that people can act on that even more consistently, and what that means is that everyone has the authority to respond to the chant that they face. However, they choose teams that do big things, are exercising that muscle...

...to take the action necessary to succeed. And what that means, then, is I'm in meeting that perhaps there's, you know, my boss and my boss's bosses in the meeting and I have information that I know they don't have and I know it might not be pleasant to hear. Well, my exercising my barrier breaking authority is, of course, is to speak up and to do it in a way of course that contributes. There's that contributed decision and activates the best in those that are hearing and receiving that that information. This, this is the one that is a so freeing. We have people come up to us and tells that this step has allowed them to be who they really want to be, because they're after sizing their authority to be who they know they are. What do you think it is about? I guess why? Don't you think that people naturally operate in that way? Is it? Is it lack of self esteem? What do you think attributes to that? There's a lot of variables. It comes down to two specifically. A one is my individual mastery to demonstrate that authority. And there were two. It's the system with that I'm I'm in, it's the team around me, it's the processes, the structure with the new organization. Those do influence our thinking and actions as human beings. Is the key, though, and this is why this is a team, a book about teams that do big things and separate the typical traditional leadership book, because we are the system, who are a part of that. And so cold we say, Hey, what does it look like? Exercise or barrier breaking, a thor look like for you. Why is that important? What will we do when we see it? Exercise are barrier breaking through? Hey, that actually is a brace of or kind of sets me off. Will we have their back? Will we fight for their successor will we criticize them? These are the discussions that successful teams are all. I love it. I love it. So this, this fifth piece of the framework, Craig, is to focus on what matters. This seems pretty self explanatory, but I'd love to hear you explain this one...

...in the context of doing make things. Yeah, so, a lot of times of folks all a matter. People are think, focus on our on our Delivera, but we got to focus on results. We are. We are acknowledging that and we're also adding that element better. Everybody know important that this is a cause of effect world. Causes those great results to happen? Well, it's the relationships, it's the help of the relationships of those team members competing prior these results, competing teammates things and the results of whatever teams that are succeeding. Our are up front and then, consistently throughout their life cycle, are ensuring that as they're interacting with each other their full matters, and that is they're focusing on what their respect about each other. They're focusing on we really care and like about each other. They're focusing on what's important and motivates their peers so that they can help accomplish those things for their teammates. They're focusing on what matters so they can do it matters. That makes it makes perfect sense. This, this sixth step, Craig, is to to energize around a shared reality. Talk to us about this one. Yeah, teams don't fail because they don't have enough time. Let's just start right there, because most teams will use that, and I say most because this is according to research. They'll say, Hey, time, we didn't have enough time, we don't have enough time, and of course these are good in the heart attack teams that fail before they reach the face. Where teams often fail is because they're functioning for the team. The members of the team are functioning from a different reality, and so what's necessary is to actually use a method we call the energy map, so people can actually address the issues they're facing with a shared reality. They can bring their unique and diverse perspectives, that one's critical talents and strengths and now we're addressing the issue in a way where our emotions are not getting in the way of our thinking, are not getting in the way terms of Howard functioning together, sharing, functioning from...

...shared reality is vital. Can you are an example, crag, of what a shared reality could look like? You got it. So let's use that team we're talking about. A little bit ago, they found out from their provider that they're going to get the receive the materials twenty seven days later. Well, it's different when we function from different reality. We have some people who are seeking to identify who's to blame their functioning from that reality. We have some people on the team who are simply looking for the facts. Is it twenty seven days? Is a twenty five days? I need to know exactly is it going to how's it going to affect our costs and so forth. We have others on the same team who are actually moving right to solutions, saying, well, who do we get other material from in the less amount of time? You put those three people in the same room, you're not going to have a discussion that's going to be productive. And yet teens are repeating that dysfunctional scattered, fractured reality sort of approach over and over and over again. This is about coming together, saying what are the facts? What information do we have? What needs to what we need to do to ensure accountability? What possible solutions? How do we make this work, and so forth, and so I'm assuming that then falls on the that's the responsibility of the leader to to not make sure that we're just looking at kind of siload realities, but we're looking at all of the realities and then having a conversation around all of those things. Teams, a lovely man, because you're doing good work and I'm going to actually add your comments here. This is this is a paradigm sure for someone. I want to invite all of us to move from. Yes, we're just waiting for the leader to drive that shared reality. We will wait for a long time. And so this is about developing the leaders of the context of teens and saying that we actually all have a responsibility to drive that shared reality. Now the leader plays a huge role, positional authority. No doubt about it, is going to have a huge impact there. I'm not suggesting it doesn't. I am encouraging us to realize and embrace the interstaying that it's everyone's responsibility. I love that. I love that this, this last piece of the Framework Crag is to mobilize hearts...

...and minds forward. You have you have this as part of the the subtitle of the book. So it's obviously a very important piece of this framework. Talk to us about what this looks like. My good friend of Dali Lama told me wants to open the mind, you must first open the heart. Now, one part of that statement was a lie, and that is at the Dalai Lama, was a good friend of mine, the tally Lama, didn't facts say who open the mind, you must first open the heart. And what we're seeing time and time again, James, is that leaders again and attempt to influence others, or actually anybody who wants to step up, or oftentimes to try and attempting to persuade others to change their behaviors by preaching through intellectual exercises. It. Changing behaviors is not an intellectual exercise. It's the business of the heart, and the best way to activate the heart is what soacrities talked about thousands of years ago, and that's they pass a different question ask elevated questions, questions that happen to propose questions that happened to vision questions that happened to motivations, open the heart and therefore activate the mind, which are mobilizes us in the team forward. And so could you, could you maybe walk us through some examples of these elevated questions? Could be, Greig, you got it in the timing is important on these, the traditional execution question sound like this. What needs to be done? When do we have to have it done? How will we measure success in periodically encourage team members to elevate thinking and consciousness by asking this type of question as it relates to delivering the objective? How is that entirely connected to our purpose as a team? What is the purpose of our team as we approach this challenge with our customer next one? As an example of vision questions as we move through...

...this project, I got to tell you I've gotten so mired in the details with someone please help me better understand. What's our vision for success? What will this look like when we've delivered this project? That's get Craig. This this has been this has been fantastic. If there's somebody listening to this. Obviously, I think everybody listening to this because should go check out the book's where's the best place they can find it is, you know, I'm a to me Amazon, your website, point listeners to wherever they can. They can go to to buy the book. You got it. Anywhere you like to buy your books. That even in most airports you're going to see the book as well. Of course, our website, Verius Global, v Er US global, Veri's global, has well, not just to book, a plenty of other resources and if any would like to have a discussion with me, I'd entertain that as well. At Craig at Vera's global, and excited to share that and realize what the People's passion for doing big things. I love it. I love it, Craig. Thank you so much for your time today. Make sure you go in and check out the book. Either got a Varias globalcom Amazon or a nearby airport. At Craig. Again, this has been this has been really eye opening for me. I love your passionate about this topic and I love that you guys have synthesized it into into a book. So really appreciate your time today. Thank you, James. If you're a BEDB marketer, we want to feature you on sites like Huffington Post, social media examiner and chief marketer. Every week we send out a question related to be to be marketing. We use the responses to those questions to fuel the content we write for really popular websites. So head over to sweet fish MEDIACOM backslash questions and sign up today. Thank you so much for listening. Until next time,.

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